Intersex

What is intersex?

Technically, intersex is defined as “congenital anomaly of the reproductive and sexual system.” Intersex people are born with external genitalia, internal reproductive organs, and/or endocrine system that are different from most other people. There is no single “intersex body;” it encompasses a wide variety of conditions that do not have anything in common except that they are deemed “abnormal” by the society. What makes intersex people similar is their experiences of medicalization, not biology. Generally speaking, intersex is not an identity category. While some intersex people do reclaim “intersex” as part of their identity, most regard it as a medical condition, or just a unique physical state. Most intersex people identify and live as ordinary men and women, and are gay, lesbian, bisexual, or straight.

Want to learn more about intersexed people?

Check out some of the resources we have on the subject! Click on the book or DVD’s image to find out more about each title.

Nonfiction

Intersex (For Lack of a Better Word) by Thea Hillman
Intersex (For Lack of a Better Word) by Thea Hillman
Between XX and XY: Intersexuality and the Myth of Two Sexes by Gerald N. Callahan PhD
Between XX and XY: Intersexuality and the Myth of Two Sexes by Gerald N. Callahan PhD
Intersex and Identity: The Contested Self by Sharon E. Preves
Intersex and Identity: The Contested Self by Sharon E. Preves

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fiction

Golden Boy: A Novel by Abigail Tarttelin
Golden Boy: A Novel by Abigail Tarttelin
Middlesex: A Novel by Jeffrey Eugenides
Middlesex: A Novel by Jeffrey Eugenides
Annabel: A Novel by Kathleen Winter
Annabel: A Novel by Kathleen Winter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

DVDs

XXY
XXY
Harsh Beauty
Harsh Beauty

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can also easily find all of our resources related to intersex by browsing our tag “Intersexed people” in our catalog.

Looking for even more information? Check out some of these online resources:

Our New Online Catalog

In case you haven’t already noticed, one of the biggest recent changes at the library is that our catalog is now available online through LibraryThing.  If you’re new to LibraryThing or if you want to learn more, take a look at our guide to using LibraryThing. You can easily search for books or browse the collection using tags.  Below are some extra tips for your hunt!

  • If you get too many results using title keywords, try adding on the year the book was published. (example: the search  gay life gets 102 results, but gay life 2007 gets only 2 results)
  • Like Google, LibraryThing will search all words together as a phrase if you add quotation marks.  (example: gay life = search for books with gay and life in the title, “gay life” = search for term  gay life) Check out LibraryThing’s wiki for more in depth search tips.

Unfortunately call numbers can’t be represented with ease in this new system.  Call numbers are now represented in the tags assigned to each book.  Just click on the tags tab to view.

(example: 2 History means that 2 is the first number of the item’s call number,  9.65 Horror indicates that the first three numbers of the items call number.)

The call numbers for DVDs work a bit differently.  Once you locate the item you want in the catalog, write down the first four letters of the title and the year the item was published. The word “the” is ignored.  This gives you the call number for feature films. (example: Orlando=ORLA 1999, The Rocky Horror Picture Show=ROCK 1998)

Add DOC to the beginning of all this and you’ve got the call number for a DVD documentary. (example: Tongues Untied=DOC TONG 1991)

For television series, add TV. (example: Angels in America=TV ANGE 2004)

As always, if you have trouble locating something feel free to ask for assistance!