Book of the Week – Out in the Country: Youth, Media, and Queer Visibility in Rural America

outinthecountryThere are numerous publications that focus on queer, urban life in locations such as San Francisco, Los Angeles, and New York. In her book Out in the Country, Mary L. Gray expands the scope of study on queer living by providing an ethnography and cultural exploration of queer youth in Appalachia and rural Kentucky. Gray illustrates how LGBT youth and their allies contend with the economic and social confines of the public places in their neighborhoods. Additionally, she discusses how they network online in order to find resources and connect with queer individuals across the country. Gray works to deconstruct the stereotypes attached to rural life and encourages the reader to think critically about the notion of American spaces.

New memoirs at the GLBT Library

Yesterday we highlighted a sampling of our new nonfiction. Today, let’s relax with some new memoirs.

 Nina Here Nor There
by Nick Kreiger
6.128 KRIni 2011

Ambitious, sporty, feminine “capital-L lesbians” had been Nina Krieger’s type, for friends that is. She hadn’t dated in seven years, a period of non-stop traveling–searching for what, or avoiding what, she didn’t know. When she lands in San Francisco’s Castro neighborhood, her roommates introduce her to a whole new world, full of people who identify as queer, who modify their bodies and blur the line between woman and man, who defy everything Nina thought she knew about gender and identity. Despite herself, Nina is drawn to the people she once considered freaks, and before long, she is forging a path that is neither man nor woman, here nor there. This candid and humorous memoir of gender awakening brings readers into the world of the next generation of transgender warriors and tells a classic tale of first love and self-discovery.

 The Bucolic Plague: How Two Manhattanites Became Gentlemen Farmers
by Josh Kilmer-Purcell
3.744 KILbu 2011

A happy series of accidents and a doughnut-laden escape upstate take Josh Kilmer-Purcell and his partner, Brent Ridge, to the doorstep of the magnificent (and fabulously for sale) Beekman Mansion. And so begins their transformation from uptight urbanites into the two-hundred-year-old-mansion-owning Beekman Boys. Suddenly Josh–a full time New Yorker with a successful advertising career–and Brent find themselves weekend farmers, surrounded by nature’s bounty and an eclectic cast: roosters who double as a wedding cover band; Bubby, the bionic cat; and a herd of goats, courtesy of their new caretaker, Farmer John.

 My Miserable, Lonely, Lesbian Pregnancy
by Andrea Askowitz
6.356 ASKmy 2008

Andrea Askowitz has the best life in the world. She’s pregnant and healthy. She has friends and family who love her. She has money and meaningful work. And all she can do is obsess about the one thing she doesn’t have: Kate, her ex-girlfriend. My Miserable, Lonely, Lesbian Pregnancy is a funny, whiny, all-too-real account of one girl’s true adventure in maternity. From finding a great donor who turns out to be shooting blanks (“I was a lesbian with male fertility problems.”) through all-day morning sickness and graduation into “fat-girl underwear,” Andrea’s life reads like an antidote to sugar-sweet pregnancy guides and memoirs. In week 8, her sense of smell becomes so strong that she can tell what deodorant people are wearing. In week 28, she plans a pity party, complete with black-only dress code and a violin player: “It isn’t an attempt to make fun of myself, because that would be too joyous.”

 The Commitment: Love, Sex, Marriage, and my Family
by Dan Savage
6.314 SAVco 2005

Dan Savage recounts his family’s campaign to convince him and his boyfriend, Terry, to get married, and explores how his family’s attitudes towards gay marriage reflect those of contemporary American society.

New nonfiction at the GLBT Library

Last month was a bit like Christmas around here, with our latest batch of acquisitions arriving and several generous donations. First, we’ll take a look at some of our new nonfiction titles. As always, stop by for more, and stay tuned for our new fiction and DVDs!

 Fixing Sex: Intersex, Medical Authority, and Lived Experience
by Katrina Karkazis
6.009 KARfi 2008

Examines the contemporary controversies over the medical management of intersexuality in the United States from the multiple perspectives of those most intimately involved. This work exposes the contentious disagreements – and all that those debates imply about gender and the changing landscape of intersex management.

 

 Another Country: Queer Anti-Urbanism
by Scott Herring
3.250 HERan 2010

Expands the possibilities of queer studies beyond the city limits, investigating the lives of rural queers across the United States, from faeries in the Midwest to lesbian separatist communes on the coast of Northern California.

 

 Steven Petrow’s Complete Gay & Lesbian Manners: The Definitive Guide to LGBT Life
1.400 PETst 2011

Covers topics ranging from coming out to being out in the workplace; from dealing with the joy and complexity of same-sex weddings and commitment ceremonies (including how to propose and write meaningful vows) to handling the legal paperwork every couple needs.

 

 Queer America: A People’s GLBT History of the United States
by Vicki L. Eaklor
2.640 EAKqu 2008

Focuses on 20th/21st- century U. S. history as it pertains to GLBT history. Major issues and events such as the Stonewall riot, Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell in the military, same-sex marriage, gay rights, gay pride, organizations and alliances, AIDS, and legal battles and court cases are discussed. Also included are sidebars highlighting major debates, legal landmarks and key individuals.

 

 Assuming a Body: Transgender and Rhetorics of Materiality
by Gayle Salamon
6.008 SALas 2010

Considering questions of transgendered embodiment via phenomenology (Maurice Merleau-Ponty), psychoanalysis (Sigmund Freud and Paul Ferdinand Schilder), and queer theory, Salamon advances an alternative theory of normative and non-normative gender, proving the value and vitality of trans experience for thinking about embodiment.

 

 Just One of the Guys?: Transgender Men and the Persistence of Gender Inequality
by Kristen Schilt
4.828 SCHju 2010

The fact that men and women continue to receive unequal treatment at work is a point of contention among politicians, the media, and scholars. Common explanations for this disparity range from biological differences between the sexes to the conscious and unconscious biases that guide hiring and promotion decisions. Just One of the Guys? sheds new light on this phenomenon by analyzing the unique experiences of transgender men–people designated female at birth whose gender identity is male–on the job.