A Time of Growth: The University Library System

The University Archives recently processed the collections of three IU Libraries administrators. Each played an important role in the development of the library that we know today.

Robert A. Miller, Director of Libraries, 1944, P0044872
Robert A. Miller, Director of Libraries, 1944

Robert A. Miller (Library Director from 1942 until his retirement in 1972) is considered responsible for the structure of the university library system that is in place today.  He also worked closely with the architects and building planners who designed the Main Library (today the Herman B Wells Library).

From the early 1900s, the Bloomington campus library was located in Franklin Hall. However, the dramatic increase in student enrollment after World War I meant that the library had long outgrown its Franklin Hall home. IU’s President and later Chancellor, Herman B Wells had long advocated for a new library space. Finally, in 1966 plans for what would be called the Main Library were implemented under Library Director Robert A. Miller.  It was decided that the location of the new library would be at the intersection of 10th Street and Jordan Avenue next door to Memorial Stadium (the stadium was demolished in 1982 for the Arboretum).

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Main Library construction May 3, 1967.
Main Library construction, June 2, 1966
Main Library construction, June 2, 1966

Designed to house 2,600,000 volumes and 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students, in 2005 the library was renamed the Herman B Wells Library in honor of his dedication and support for the university library system.

Cecil K. Byrd served in several positions during his tenure at IU, including Curator of Rare Books and Special Collections, Associate Professor, Assistant Director of Libraries, University Librarian, and finally professor and librarian emeritus. He assisted in the design of the Lilly Library and was instrumental in the donation of J.K. Lilly and Bernardo Mendel collections to the Lilly.

The impetus for a rare book and manuscript library at Indiana University was born in 1956 with the donation of J.K. Lilly’s extensive collection of rare books and manuscripts. The collection contained around 20,000 first editions and 17,000 thousand manuscripts. Construction began in March of 1958, opened to the public in June of 1959, and was dedicated on October 3, 1960. Today the Lilly holds more than 4 million books, 7.5 million manuscripts, 150,000 pieces of sheet music, and 30,000 puzzles.

Construction of the Lilly, March 2, 1959.
Construction of the Lilly, March 2, 1959
Architectural drawing of north elevation of the Lilly Library, circa 1955
Architectural drawing of the Lilly Library, circa 1955

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finally, Wilmer H. Baatz (Assistant Library Director from 1966-1986), was responsible for building the library’s Afro-American studies collection and the inter-campus borrowing system.

If you’re interested in learning more about these collections of the history of the IU Libraries, contact the IU Archives.

Bernard Fry Papers

The Indiana University Archives is pleased to announce that the finding aid for both the dean’s records and personal papers of Bernard M. Fry are now available!

Fry2Bernard M. Fry was born on October 24, 1915 in Bloomfield, Indiana.  Fry was an alumnus of Indiana University, earning his Bachelors and first Masters degrees here in 1937 and 1939.  He later went on to earn a second Masters from Catholic University and his Ph.D. from American University.  Before his tenure at IU, he worked for the Library of Congress, the Atomic Energy Commission, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Commerce.  Additionally, Fry served as editor of two international research journals, Government Publications Review, and its successor, Information Processing and Management.

Much like the recent School of Library and Information Science merger with the School of Informatics, in 1967, the library and information program here at Indiana University also underwent a major change. The library program was then a part of the School of Education and was known as the Division of Library Science.  The Division of Library Science split from the School of Education to become the Graduate Library School.  Shortly thereafter, Fry was named Dean of the Graduate Library School, a position he held until 1980. The same year he retired, the school changed names again to become the School of Library and Information Science.

One of Fry’s crowning achievements during his time as dean was the establishment of the Research Center for Library and Information Science in 1968.  The Research Center was responsible for major studies conducted for the National Science Foundation, the Department of Education, the Department of Defense, and the Library of Congress.  From a NSF-funded project Fry co-authored a book with RCLIS director Herbert S. White, Publishers and Libraries: A Study of Scholarly and Research Journals. The book was awarded the “Best Information Science Book of the Year” for 1977.

Fry

In 1980, Fry retired as dean and spent nearly four years as the director of the RCLIS. Upon his retirement from IU in 1984, he was named Professor Emeritus of Library Science.  Fry passed away in 1994 at the age of 78.

American Veterans Commitee – Bloomington Chapter

American_Veterans_CommitteeFormed in 1943, the American Veterans Committee was meant to serve as a more liberal alternative to other veteran’s organizations such as the American Legion. Chapters were formed across the country and the organization sought to undertake political and social issues such as civil rights and civil liberties.

A local chapter of the organization was formed on the Indiana University Bloomington campus and was largely comprised of male students who were attending college on the G.I. Bill. History Professor C. Leonard Lundin served as the group’s faculty sponsor during the chapter’s short existence in Bloomington. In oral history interviews conducted in 1972, 1985, and 1994 Professor Lundin comments that the organization was “supposed to be a sort of liberal version of the American Legion, and it was for a while and then petered out…it didn’t last very long here.” (1985) He also told interviewers that while the organization existed on campus, he was very actively involved. “I think it’s strongest hold almost everywhere [was] among the veteran students at universities. This campus was no exception. It took a decided interest in community affairs.”(1972) “They had been roused by the war,” Lundin notes. “Then of course came the McCarthy years” (1985).

Image from The Arbutus yearbook, 1946
Bloomington AVC, Image from The Arbutus yearbook, 1946

National membership in the AVC dropped dramatically during the late forties and early fifties as worries about communism swept the nation. Members of the American Communist Party had originally been opposed to their members joining the AVC because they felt the organization was too “ivy-league” but later reversed their position. As the AVC gained communists members, the Second Red Scare, or McCarthyism, was taking hold in America. In order to avoid scandal, the AVC dismissed its communist members. However, their membership significantly decreased and remained low for the rest of its existence. The organization formally disbanded in 2008 when the last two chapters folded.

Despite its short tenure, the Bloomington chapter of the AVC actively worked to better the Indiana University campus and larger community through efforts towards desegregation on campus and the larger Bloomington community, as well as better housing and payment for veterans.

The Archives holds a scrapbook of the local chapter, which has been fully digitized. Take a look and let us know if you have any further questions!

The Bored Walk

BoredWalk006BoredWalk008Feb1940

Self-described as “the humerous publication of Indiana U.” the Bored Walk was a humorous college magazine published by students at Indiana University from around 1931 until 1942.  The publication featured jokes, cartoons, and campus gossip and news. Cover art was unique and often featured student artwork.

October 1935The 1931 Arbutus described the Bored Walk‘s scandal page, “Borings,” as one of its most interesting features, though the content was usually related to campus happenings and may be difficult for today’s reader to fully understand. For example, a “scandal” tidbit from the 1934 remarked that, “Maybe the coeducational system has its good points after all. Fygam Flowers had intended to deny our almy mammy the pleasure of his Feb1934presence this semester. But he met Trydelt Prentice and changed his mind.”  A 1942 Borings report similarly states that, “S.A.E. ex-rod man Neal Gilliatt recently placed his badge for safe keeping in the care of Theta Mary Rees.  If she keeps it as safely as she does her scholastic average, Neal will never more wear his frat pin.”

As is the case with many magazines of this time period, BoredWalk004it is also particularly striking that nearly every back cover features a large, colored cigarette ad.  Yet interestingly, in a letter to President William Lowe Bryan, the magazine’s 1935 general manager comments that “A high standard of advertising has been maintained although it has meant the rejection of lucrative contracts for beer and liquor advertising.”  Apparently alcohol was not appropriate for students, but cigarettes were!

The Bored Walk student staff members believed their privately owned and operated publication to be highly circulated, widely read, and much enjoyed.  In 1932, the staff attempted to hand it over to the University in order to ensure its continued publication citing a circulation of 2,000 copies and that subscriptions were not merely for IU students. Subscribers included folks outside the state of Indiana, and that a number of readers were potential IU students and extension students. The Board of Trustees considered the matter, but declined.

In 1942 student owner Meredith Bratton once again tried to sell the publication before he joined the military but IU News Bureau Director E. Ross Bartley opposed the proposition saying, “The parents of our students would not understand how the University would permit some of the things that have been published in the last two years.” Bratton replied that he did not want to hand over management of the Bored Walk, but simply wanted University backing in order to more easily obtain advertising and gain recognition from the merchants bureau of Indianapolis.

Eventually, two students by the names of Bob Anderson and Nat Hill leased the Bored Walk from Bratton. The magazine, however, went into a steady decline following a series of complaints from the Dean of Women, local church officials, administrators, and Bloomington residents over the magazine’s content. The IU Bookstore and Union both cancelled their subscriptions. The October 1942 issue sealed the Bored Walk‘s fate. According to a letter written by Bartley, the offending issue contained several jokes of a sexual nature, some of which included rude remarks against the Catholic Church. Furthermore, a local priest had felt it necessary to report the magazine to higher church officials as material not suitable for Catholics to read. Anderson and Hill shouldered the blame and requested that the University order the cessation of the publication.

IU Comptroller W. G. Biddle wrote to Meredith Bratton at naval training to tell him the news of the publication’s end stating, “It was no longer decent enough to distributed as a product of Indiana University students.” Unfortunately, no copies of the issue in question exist in our collection, so we can’t see the offending articles for ourselves.

Interested in learning more about the Bored Walk? Contact the staff at the Archives!

Myles Brand’s Presidential records

The finding aid for the presidential records of former Indiana University president Myles Brand is now available online.

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Myles Brand was born on May 17, 1942 in Brooklyn, New York. He earned degrees from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the University of Rochester before beginning his career as a professor of philosophy. He soon moved into administration in addition to his teaching duties, among his positions serving as the dean for the Colleges of Arts and Sciences at the University of Arizona and as provost and vice-president for academic affairs at Ohio State University. From 1989-1994, he served as president of the University of Oregon.

Brand became the sixteenth president of Indiana University on August 1, 1994, a position he held until 2002. During his tenure as president, IU saw a great deal of growth both economically and academically. Among his achievements are growth in fundraising and the university endowment, research grants, the creation of the School of Informatics, development of the Central Indiana Life Sciences Initiative, and creation the IU Advanced Research and Technology Institute (now the IU Research and Technology Corp).

The School of Informatics, now the School of Informatics and Computing, was the first of its kind in the country and helped make IU a leader in the field of informatics and information technology. Brand also oversaw the gift of the Lilly Endowment to fund the Indiana Genomics Initiative (INGEN). At $105 million, it was the largest private gift in the university’s history to date. It is considered by some IU administrators to be one of Brand’s most lasting legacies.

Brand with the Board of Trustees and IU Administrators
Brand with the Board of Trustees and IU Administrators

During the course of his career, Brand served or headed a number of academic committees, including the American Council on Education (1994-1997), the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges (1995-1998,  and the Association of American Universities (1999-2000).

Upon his departure from Indiana University, Brand became the fourth president of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) in 2003 where he worked to bring reform to college athletics. Myles Brand passed away on September 16, 2009.

Contact the University Archives to learn more about the presidency of Myles Brand.