Fraternity Exchange Students in the 1930s

We recently received a reference request concerning an exchange student from England during the 1930s. This spurred research into an interesting exchange student program that Indiana University had just begun at the time. Although we don’t have much information on the student the original reference request was about, we do have a letter from the IU student who went to England.

Fraternity exchange plans began in 1935-1936 with the Phi Delta Theta fraternity chapter at IU. They provided a German student with free room and board, and the university gave the student free tuition. The next academic year, a student from IU went to Germany and received free room, board, and tuition. In the 1937-1938 academic year, the Board of Trustees (see the May 18, 1937 Trustees minutes) in conjunction with three fraternities offered free tuition, room, and board to a Swiss student, a German student, and an English student.

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Gilbert Bailey

Gilbert Bailey was the IU exchange student to University of London Southampton in 1937-1938. Originally, an English student was to come to IU the same year, but delays from the University of London Southampton kept him from coming until the following academic year. That student was Terence Lane. He attended IU and received room and board at Phi Delta Theta for the 1938-1939 year. In the letter below to Paul Feltus, the editor of the Bloomington Star, in 1937, Bailey writes,

The officials of the university here have received the plan enthusiastically and are already making plans to submit the idea to the English National Students’ Union in the hope that the plan will be extended to include exchanges between many English and American universities. It is only because the idea is new here that more time is needed to complete the first American-English exchange.

Letter to Paul Feltus from Gilbert Bailey, August 24, 1937, C213

Bailey received good reviews as a student from the University of London Southampton. Bailey went on to encourage more university exchanges. While he was a student at IU, he was a member of the IDS staff. He was from Delphi, Indiana.

When Bailey had gone to study in England, the university there was supposed to send one of their students to IU. However, they were unable to do so until the following academic year. That student was Terence Lane. He attended IU and received room and board at Phi Delta Theta for the 1938-1939 year.

If you would like to know more about exchange programs at IU, please contact the Archives.

James Robert “Bob” Leffler: The Discovery in Archival Research

While recently perusing the reference files in the IU Archives reading room, I happened upon an unusual object: a vinyl record. Thinking this was a strange item to be in a reference file, I spoke with one of the archivists and decided to do some further investigation. As it turns out, the record belonged to James Robert Leffler, known as Bob Leffler. After some searching, I discovered that the IU Archives does not hold much about him. This proved to be a potential case study on how to do archival research, so I began my work.

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175th Anniversary of Monroe County & Bloomington: Robert Leffler – Speaker. Courtesy of Monroe County History Center Research Library.

I was able to determine that a Leffler archival collection exists at the Monroe County History Center Research Library. This is an instance where the archival research process can be more complicated than originally thought. Instead of simply looking at the IU Archives resources as I normally do for blog posts, I was going to have to piece together the story from outside sources—including making a trip off-campus. In the meantime, I worked on locating any information I could from the resources in the IU Archives.

One resource I turned to was Archives Online at Indiana University, our portal for searching archives collections across campus. I determined that Leffler was not in any collections held by the University Archives, but that he did appear in a collection from the Indiana University Center for the Study of History and Memory, now the Center for Documentary Research and Practice. This particular archive contained an oral history interview on movie theaters in which Leffler had participated, but I was more concerned with his biography as it pertained to IU.

I also utilized online resources provided by the IU Libraries, such as the NewspaperARCHIVE and Ancestry Library Edition , to find more information about Leffler. I found very little beyond immediate family member names and public records through Ancestry; however, the reference file where I had originally found the vinyl record did contain some information. This file was not labeled for Leffler, but for Leffler’s family; it contained mostly genealogical information. Although it did not provide information about Bob Leffler, I did discover that he had relatives, Shepherd and Isaac Leffler, who had attended Indiana University in its early years. Both are mentioned in the First Catalogue as students in the early 1830s. Apparently, Shepherd moved to Iowa and became a Congressman.

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Four Walking Tour Pamphlets from the James Robert “Bob” Leffler Collection. Courtesy of Monroe County History Center Research Library.
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“Historical Bloomington, A Guide” from the James Robert “Bob” Leffler Collection. Courtesy of Monroe County History Center Research Library.

Since I discovered that the Monroe County History Center Research Library had a collection on Leffler,  I contacted Emily Noffke, who very kindly scheduled a research visit. When I arrived, I was required to wash my hands before I viewed the archival collection. This is a small example of how different institutions have different rules for interacting with archival collections. While the Leffler collection was small, I did get pictures of Leffler and his files. Thanks to his obituary, I learned that he did indeed have a closer connection to IU than I originally thought. Leffler received his bachelor’s degree from the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music, but he came back home to Bloomington and attended the Indiana University School of Music for his master’s degree. He went on to teach music at the Cincinnati Conservatory of Music and the New York Institute for the Education of the Blind. Leffler also became known for his local history (Bloomington) expertise. He was a member of the Monroe County Historical Society, who named him Historian/Laureate of Monroe County. Most of his collection at the MCHC Research Library appears to be his notes and work on Monroe County history.

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Leffler listed in the upper left-hand corner of the Indiana University Catalog, 1936

So what about the vinyl record? It is labeled “The Power of Love” and is accompanied by sheet music and correspondence. It appears that, as a musician, Leffler was asked about the recording of the song “The Power of Love” on this record. Apparently, the song was written by Jim Boothe, one of the writers of “Jingle Bell Rock.”

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“The Power of Love”

While this is only a small example, my quest to discover more about Bob Leffler and his record exemplify the exciting journey of archival research. Thank you to the Monroe County History Center Research Library and Emily Noffke for the research help.

Daniel Read: The Professor Who Saved the Universities

Do you often wonder about the name behind a building? Most buildings on campus are named for someone, but most people probably do not know who those mysterious persons are. Some of them may have been more recent donors or some, such as Daniel Read, may be figures from the early years of the University.

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Photograph of Daniel Read

Daniel Read, for whom Read Hall is named, was born in Ohio in 1805. He attended Ohio University, from which he graduated in 1824. He went on to receive a Master of Arts degree in 1827 and then an honorary LL.D. in the 1850s from Indiana Asbury University (which is now DePauw University). He was technically a lawyer, but he never practiced. During the 1830s, he returned to his alma mater to be a professor of classics (or ancient languages, depending on the source) and eventually vice-president. He was also a visitor at the military academy at West Point.

Eventually, however, Read made his way to Indiana University. There he taught ancient languages from 1843 to 1856, a faculty member during the same time as Robert Milligan. While there, Read made an important contribution to the University, in effect, saving it. In 1850, Read attended a state constitutional convention. The University was in danger of losing its land—granted by the government. Read ensured that the funds designated for the University (the land) would stay with the University. Read had, in fact, saved the University. A few years later, in 1854, he and another professor would travel to Washington, D.C., to successfully petition for land from the federal government. Although not at Indiana University very long—only thirteen years—Read made an impact on the University.

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A speech Read gave at IU

After leaving Indiana University, Read went on to teach at the University of Wisconsin, where he was a professor of Mental and Moral Philosophy, and then to become the president of the University of Missouri, from 1866 to 1876. Read had an impact at the University of Missouri as well. He worked to widen the educational opportunities at that university in the form of a normal school and an agricultural and mechanics school. Another important contribution was once again in the form of greatly helping the university as a whole. Read worked to push the General Assembly of the state to recognize the university. Read also felt strongly about women attending universities, working towards admitting women to the University of Missouri. When he had been at Indiana and had attended the state constitutional convention, he had also been a supporter of women’s rights.

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Another letter concerning Theodore’s death

While Read had a great impact on the universities where he worked, his family also had an impact on the world. His sister, Mrs. McPherson, was the head of the Female Seminary. Another famous relation was his great-great-nephew, John Foster Dulles. Sadly, his own immediate family was marked with tragedy. Read, with his wife Alice, had two children, Theodore and Agnes, whose lives ended when they were young adults. Theodore fought in the Civil War, rising to the rank of Brigadier General and surviving most of the war. However, in a tragic stroke of fate, he was killed at Appomattox. Read wrote a moving letter in which he describes how Theodore’s death affected the family:

“[He] proposed in his very last letter to have one of his sisters, after things became regulated, visit him. But it is all over. My family is bereft of him to whom we all looked as our ornament, comfort and support. I can only cry out, O Theodore, my son Theodore. How terrible that this calamity should have come after he seemed to be safe. In my own thoughts and my congratulations with friends I had just said – Well, thank God, it is over and Theodore is living. Just then a dispatch from Major Seward was put in my hands in these words – ‘Brig. Gen. Read was killed on Tuesday 9th heading the most gallant fight of the war’ He was mistaken, I think, as to day, but oh, such glory – Moving glory that takes away all the hopes and comfort of parents, wife, sisters.”

Only the next year, in 1866, Agnes died, having been in poor health for a while. Read himself died in 1878.

Daniel Read, perhaps now lost in obscurity simply as the namesake of a hall, should be remembered as the professor who fought for the rights of women and fought to save universities, one of them being our own Indiana University.

Walter Q. Gresham: 19th Century Judge and General

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Letter from Gresham addressed to his wife

As you walk across campus, you may notice that most buildings have names. Some names may be familiar or well-known, but others may not particularly stand out. However, the people behind some of those names can have fascinating stories. One such person is Walter Q. Gresham. Gresham, an Indiana native, was born in 1833. He attended Indiana University Prep for a year and then became a student of law. By 1854, he had been admitted to the Bar and was on his way to an illustrious career. He briefly served his home state as a member of the Indiana General Assembly; Gresham then went on to serve his country during the Civil War, rising through the ranks to become a brigadier-general. He also organized the 53rd Indiana Infantry and was wounded at Atlanta during the war, ending his time of service.

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Handwritten copy of a letter from Gresham to his wife from Vicksburg. The handwritten copy was written by his son, Otto.

During this time, he sent letters to his wife, Matilda, which can be seen in the picture above and the picture to the left. The letter pictured above includes details of his recent experiences in the war, but it also includes a touching note to his wife and children:

“Don’t be uneasy if you don’t hear from me regularly for some time for I will have very few opportunities to write. Write often & continue to direct your letters as heretofore. I think of you often, yes every hour in the day I think of my dear wife & children. It is hard to be thus separated but a man must do his duty to his country in a time like this. God bless you & the children & take care of you is my purpose. I must lay down & take a nap for I will be up at 3 o’clock in the morning. Good night.

Your Officer Husband,

W. Q. Gresham”

In the copy of the letter transcribed by his son Otto, Gresham writes from Vicksburg in July of 1963 and describes how his regiment has marched over fifty miles over only a couple days. He takes great pride in the Indiana 53rd, saying, “Never did the 53d show its superiority over other regiments as it has on this March.”

After the war, Gresham’s career rose to a national level. From 1869 to 1883, Gresham served as a US District Judge. Indiana University then conferred an honorary LL.D. upon him in 1883. President Arthur then appointed Gresham as Postmaster-general, followed by appointment as Secretary of the Treasury; however, he was not in these positions very long. In 1884, he became a judge on the U.S. Circuit Court and served in this position until 1893. Gresham was a candidate for the Republican presidential ticket in 1888, although he did not receive the nomination. In 1893, he served as Secretary of State for President Cleveland. Gresham did not serve in this position for a lengthy time, as he died in 1895.

Gresham’s legacy lived on, however, as his family donated his sword from the war to Indiana University in 1911. Sadly, IU no longer has Gresham’s sword, but his legacy lives on through the dining hall with his name on the Bloomington campus. A large collection of Gresham’s papers can also be found at the Library of Congress.

Display card for General Gresham's sword
Display card for General Gresham’s sword

A Bicentennial Gift from the IU GBLT Student Support Services Office

The Indiana University GLBT Student Support Services Office kindly donated their wonderful collection of scrapbooks to the Indiana University Archives as a “Bicentennial gift.” With the launching of the Bicentennial website and many Signature Projects, Doug Bauder, Director of the IU GLBT Student Support Services Office, thought it was the perfect time to donate these valuable pieces of history.

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An early pamphlet from the office

The scrapbooks are the newest addition to the Indiana University Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Student Support Services Office records in the IU Archives. Starting in 1994, the year the office was created, these scrapbooks document the office and other GLBT events and issues in the larger community through pictures, memorabilia, and newspaper clippings.

In these scrapbooks, one can find photos of the many workers and volunteers who have served in the office, as well as photos of events the office has held across the years.

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Flier from 10th Anniversary

Some of the stories documented in the scrapbooks include the controversy surrounding the creation of the office, the celebration of more equal marriage rights, and the Pride celebrations in Bloomington.

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Photos from the early years of the office

The scrapbooks also contain multiple posters and other memorabilia from various events. Additionally, throughout the scrapbooks one can find the moving stories of GLBT students and their struggles for acceptance. Especially moving are the stories of GLBT youth whose families cut them off financially but found help through the GLBT Student Support Services Office emergency scholarship funds. One scrapbook contains letters of appreciation and articles about the 10th anniversary of the office in 2004, while another scrapbook celebrates the 20th anniversary of the office in 2014. This scrapbook contains heart-felt thank you notes expressing gratitude for the services the office offered. In this scrapbook and throughout the others the hard work and support of Doug Bauder, as well as others, is readily apparent. Through items such as articles, posters, photos, and thank you notes, these scrapbooks provide an overview of GLBT life in Bloomington and on campus over the past twenty-two years.

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Thank you notes from 20th Anniversary