This Summer, Live Your Language and Experience the World!

Sampling the local cuisine. A dish of paella. C689 IUHPFL records.

Have you ever dreamed about spending the summer in Mexico? Or of eating paella in Spain, visiting historic sites in France, cultivating a community garden in Chile, or immersing yourself in Japanese culture? For Indiana high school students, that dream can become a reality through the Indiana University Honors Program in Foreign Languages for High School Students, also known as IUHPFL.

The IUHPFL is a summer study abroad program specifically for high school students from Indiana. It was started in 1962 as a way to encourage the study of foreign languages and knowledge of other cultures among pre-college age students. When the program began, it operated three sites, one each in France, Germany, and Mexico. This summer, the program offers instruction in five languages – Chinese, French, German, Japanese, and Spanish – and students can travel to one of twelve different cities in eight countries.

For five to six weeks in June and July, students study a foreign language and live with a host family. They are encouraged to engage with the local culture as much as possible: besides their host family, there are excursions, lectures, activities such as sporting events and choir, and community engagement activities, such as working with local senior citizens.

C689 IUHPFL records.

The Program’s records spanning 1963-2017 are now at the Archives and a collection description can be found on ArchivesOnline! Teaching materials within the collection show that students work hard and learn a lot, but the photographs, articles, and clippings also show how much fun they have and how much they interact with the local culture. One very charming aspect of the collection is the group of student projects. As a reflection on their experiences, students in the different cities put together booklets with comments about what they learned about their host city and what they did during the program. In these booklets, you can find essays, poems, drawings, recipes, and heartfelt thank you letters to their host families. The 2011 booklet for the program in Brest, France, contains essays by the students about subjects such as the outings they went on with their host families, what they learned about Brest and World War II, and their experiences with French food, including one student’s love for Nutella milkshakes!

Student project booklet from the program in Brest, France, for 2011. C689 IUHPFL records.

A video made by the IUHPFL office shows several students talking about how the study abroad experience was one of the best of their lives, and other materials show that the sentiment was mutual. Newspaper clippings from foreign newspapers, as well as a CD with an interview from a radio station in Spain show that the host cities were equally excited about their foreign guests from Indiana.

Even if you’re well past high school age, the records and activities of the IUHPFL are a reminder to, in the words of one of their promotional posters, live your language! In other words, live your best life and experience the world around you. Seize the day! Carpe diem! Interested in seeing the records? Contact University Archives staff!

Love Is in the Air at the Archives!

Over the past few weeks, I looked for love in all the right places, namely, within the University Archives! On February 1, the Archives sponsored a Pop-Up! exhibit, “Love and Friendship in the Archives.” In honor of Valentine’s Day, the exhibit examined love and friendship contained in the Archives’ collections. I worked on the exhibit, which allowed me to discover part of the long history of love at IU.

On one hand, I learned about IU traditions and campus spots associated with love. For instance, there was the Board Walk, a path that crisscrossed the Old Crescent, stretching from Indiana Avenue to Forest Place (now home to Ballantine) and was known in the early decades of the twentieth century as the “lover’s lane” of campus. There is also the “Spooning Wall” or the “Lovers’ Wall,” which still stretches along Third Street. Hoagy Carmichael is said to have found his inspiration for “Stardust” while sitting on the Lovers’ Wall.

Page from the scrapbook of Joan Richards Neff, class of 1949. IU Archives Collection C597.
Page from the scrapbook of Joan Richards Neff, class of 1949. IU Archives Collection C597.

But more important were the personal glimpses that I got into the lives of IU students and faculty. The Archives contains many scrapbooks from students who documented the love and friendship they found here. One set of scrapbooks belonged to Doris Joan Richards Neff, who attended IU from 1945 to 1949. She put together a scrapbook for each year she was at IU, filled with mementos from dances, parties, and even impromptu taco dinners with friends. While a student, Joan met Franklin Neff, and the two married after graduation. Joan kept all kinds of things related to her romance with Frank, including parts of the gifts he gave her, dried roses she received for their anniversaries, and Valentines from Frank and his mother.

Valentine from Cecilia Hennel Hendricks family papers, IU Archives Collection C413.
Valentine from Cecilia Hennel Hendricks family papers, IU Archives Collection C413.

Believe it or not, students weren’t the only ones expressing their love at IU – apparently, faculty sometimes find love too! Perhaps my favorite examples are in the Cecilia Hennel Hendricks family papers and the Avis Tarrant Burke papers. All three Hennel sisters – Cecilia, Cora, and Edith – were students at IU in the 1900s, and all three taught on the faculty at various times. In 1913, Cecilia resigned as an instructor in the English Department in order to marry John Hendricks, and the two moved to Wyoming to run a bee farm. Being so far away didn’t stop Cecilia from keeping close ties with the rest of her family. The Hendricks family kept up a lively correspondence, and in a letter of February 17, 1914, Cecilia wrote that in one day, she received 11 letters, one card, and a package in the mail! The family papers are full of Valentines from daughter to mother, daughter to father, and from the whole family to their grandfather. In later life, when Cecilia returned to IU to teach in the English Department, she was so beloved by her students that some of them sent her Valentine cards and even flowers.

For sheer romance, though, you almost can’t beat the tenderness that existed between Avis Tarrant Burke and her husband, Robert E. Burke. Avis Tarrant married her old friend Robert in 1916 and moved to Bloomington to be with him. Robert was an assistant professor of Fine Arts, and Avis taught at the McCalla school and eventually worked at the University Extension Division. The two traveled together extensively, including to Europe, Hawaii, and the Pacific Northwest. Avis kept travel diaries that documented their adventures together, as well as personal diaries that documented less sensational “adventures.” For February 14, 1942, she wrote in her diary about two “events” for the day: Robert gave her a box of chocolates for Valentine’s Day and that she spent the morning cleaning out the closets!

Whenever the two were apart, they wrote very touching letters and poems to each other. One letter that Robert wrote to Avis reads, “Darling One: Perhaps this is silly to write to you when you are right downstairs now – but I want you to have this line from me just as soon as you get to Winsted [Connecticut] – all it says is that I love you more all the time and shall miss you very much. However, we’ll both keep very busy & so try to make the times pass quickly. xxxxxx Robert.” Avis wrote poems expressing how lonely she was walking down the streets of Chicago without Robert, as well as poems such as “To My Valentine of Twenty Years.” It seems like the love and affection that Avis and Robert had for each other never faded.

Robert Burke to wife Avis. IU Archives Collection C96.
Robert Burke to wife Avis. IU Archives Collection C96.

But perhaps the most touching example of unfading love that I saw was the drafts of a poem by Philip Appleman, a prolific writer and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of English. His papers include drafts of a poem he wrote for his wife Marjorie. Originally entitled “A Poem for Beautiful Breasts,” in later drafts the title of the poem changed to “Mastectomy.” Appleman seems to have written the poem while his wife was undergoing surgery. He imagines the procedure to himself, and then concludes the poem with the powerful lines, “I will love her more / than yesterday.”

Part of the beauty of a place like the IU Archives is that love never dies.

Come find love at the IU Archives!

How Do You Succeed in Business? By Taking Classes in Literature, Music, Fine Arts, and International Issues!

In the summer of 1952, IU’s Graduate School of Business launched an intensive summer program for business executives. For three weeks in June and July over two consecutive years, executives from across Indiana and the nation converged on the Bloomington campus. They stayed in rooms at the Union Club, ate their meals together with faculty members in the Memorial Union, and in the evenings they engaged in discussion groups and played tennis or golf. In between those activities, they took classes. A lot of classes. They took classes like Management of Business Finance, Management of Marketing Programs, and Business Cycles and Conditions. They also took classes in literature, music, and fine arts.

Designed with the needs of local and national businesses in mind, and often with their input and suggestions, the goal of the Executive Development Program was to prepare executives to take over top management positions in their companies. Praised by Herman B Wells as a pioneering program in adult education, the EDP prepared executives to face the needs of modern business life by developing the whole person, both professionally and personally. To do that, courses were offered in Speech Training for Executives, Music for the Executive, and Current Trends in Literature, in tandem with the classes covering purely business subjects.

In January 1952, Indiana industrialist and supporter of the arts Irwin Miller sent a letter to Dean of the School of Business Arthur M. Weimer, in which he made specific suggestions about the program’s curriculum. Miller wrote, “I approve very much of the inclusion of the Music Appreciation,” but he wondered if the class in “Current Literary Trends” shouldn’t include works in philosophic history as well as literary history. Miller was sufficiently impressed with the proposed curriculum that he circulated a draft of it within the Cummins Engine Company and the Union Starch and Refining Company to find candidates for the program’s first session.

Dean J. W. Ashton taught the Current Trends in Literature class. At Dean Weimer’s suggestion that libraries be set up in each room of the Union Club for all executives in the program, Ashton provided a list of suggested books. Ashton’s list includes works by William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Katherine Mansfield, and Daphne Du Maurier, as well as collections of Russian literature, novels of science, novels of the supernatural, and British and American plays.

Student response to Ashton’s class was very positive, and the Archives contains several appreciative letters. In one, dated July 17, 1952, a manager from the Indiana Farm Bureau wrote, “It is a sure fact that the information received will be of great benefit in performing my duties for my employers.”

In the 1960s, the program realized the need to include an international dimension. A brochure from 1966 no longer includes literature classes, but it does list courses in Fine Arts and evening Musicale events. It also emphasizes the international dimension. In June 1966, executives could choose between classes in Managerial Accounting, International Operations, or History of Art, Style, and Design.

With the institution of GenEd requirements a few years ago, students in the Kelley School of Business often take classes in literature, art, music, and international cultures to fulfill their requirements. But the School of Business has a long history – over sixty years – of encouraging a well-rounded education when it comes to facing the challenges of the modern business world.