Meet author Robert K. Elder! Saturday September 7, 2013 1:00-3:00PM

“Ladies and gentlemen, by way of introduction, this is a film about trickery, fraud, about lies…almost any story is most certainly some kind of lie.” – Orson Welles, F for Fake

ElderRob

The Lilly Library is delighted to join with the IU Cinema in welcoming author, Robert K. Elder, whose archive the Lilly Library is proud to house. A meet-the-author reception will be hosted at the Lilly in the Main Gallery from 1:00-3:00PM prior to a double-screening of Orson Welles’ “F for Fake” and Lasse Hallström’s “The Hoax” which will be shown at the Indiana University cinema on Saturday, September 7 beginning at 3:00PM. http://www.cinema.indiana.edu/?post_type=series&p=4864

Rob’s new book “The Best Film You’ve Never Seen,” in which he interviews 35 directors about their favorite overlooked, forgotten or critically-savaged gems will be available for purchase and signing at the theater following the reception. http://robertkelder.com/

The Lilly is also honored to hold the archives of Orson Welles, as well as those of other film greats John Ford and Peter Bogdanovich.

Orson Welles: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/index.php?p=welles

John Ford: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/index.php?p=fordj

Peter Bogdanovich: http://www.indiana.edu/~liblilly/lilly/mss/index.php?p=bogdanovich

— Cherry Williams, Curator of Manuscripts

Faking the War of 1812

Faking the War of 1812
A talk by Lawrence Hott, producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812
Tuesday, December 4, 2012
6:30 p.m., reception to follow
The Lilly Library

Lawrence Hott will discuss the problem of historical truth in documentary film, particularly in the context of the War of 1812, a period which presents a number of challenges to a documentary filmmaker. Hott is producer/director of the documentary film, The War of 1812, broadcast on PBS in October 2011. The War of 1812 film and bonus features can be viewed online, courtesy of PBS/WNED: http://www.pbs.org/wned/war-of-1812/the-film/watch-film-and-bonus-features/

Lawrence Hott and his partner Diane Garey have been making documentary films since 1978 as part of Florentine Films, and later Hott Productions. Their productions are among the most-watched broadcasts on public television. Notable titles include John James Audubon: Drawn from Nature and Wild by Law, the story of the Wilderness Act of 1964 and three men responsible for its passage, which was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature.

Hott’s awards include an Emmy, two Academy Award nominations, the duPont-Columbia Journalism Award, the George Foster Peabody Award, five American Film Festival Blue Ribbons, and Fourteen CINE Golden Eagles. He received the Humanities Achievement Award from the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities in 1995; a Massachusetts Cultural Council/Boston Film and Video Foundation Fellowship in 2001; and the Rosalynn Carter Fellowship for Mental Health Journalism in 2001. He has been on the board of non-fiction writers at Smith College and has served as a panelist for the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Massachusetts Cultural Commission, and the Massachusetts Foundation for the Humanities. He is a member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Hott is a former juvenile court investigator and a lawyer by training, who has said that the law and documentary filmmaking have more in common than one would think: “a lot of legal practice has to do with the presentation of arguments, working with people, and being clear in your correspondence. I can’t think of a better training for a filmmaker than three years of law school.”

The talk will be followed by a reception. Both the talk and the reception are sponsored by the Friends of the Lilly Library and take place in concert with the exhibition, The War of 1812 in the Collections of the Lilly Library, on view through December 15, 2012, in the Main Gallery of the Lilly Library. An expanded version of the exhibition is available online at: http://collections.libraries.iub.edu/warof1812/

The Incredible Shrinking Man Meets The Exorcist

While a great faceoff for a Midnite Movie feature, the above represents two titles from the Lilly Library’s sizeable and eclectic science fiction and horror film script collection. The Incredible Shrinking Man (1957), scripted by Richard Matheson from his 1956 novel, The Shrinking Man, is an acknowledged sci fi classic while The Exorcist (1973) is still considered by many to be the scariest motion picture ever made. Unlike the majority of the scripts in the collection which feature dialogue, The Incredible Shrinking Man is a “picturization,” the entire film story boarded in over 600 drawings (see Figs. 1 and 2). Like many scripts in the collection, The Exorcist is a revision and contains dialogue not included in the final version of the film (see Fig. 3). The scripts representing these genres run the gamut from classic films like The Picture of Dorian Gray (1945), The Day the Earth Stood Still (1951), Forbidden Planet (1956), Planet of the Apes (1968), to lesser known B movies like The Vampire’s Ghost (1945), Monster from the Ocean Floor (1954), The Brain Eaters (1958), and Blood Orgy of the She-Devils (1972). Hammer Films, the British studio which redefined horror in the late 1950s, is represented by The Quatermass Experiment (1955), The Mummy (1959), The Phantom of the Opera (1962), Quatermass and the Pit (1967), and Lust for a Vampire (1971). Scripts for the films of legendary independent producer/director Roger Corman include The Viking Women and the Sea Serpent (1957), and two films from his well-regarded Edgar Allan Poe cycle, The Pit and the Pendulum (1961) and The Masque of the Red Death (1964). Fans of serials should consult Flash Gordon Conquers the Universe (1940) and two Republic Studio chapter plays, Flying Disc Man from Mars (1950) and Canadian Mounties vs. Atomic Invaders (1953). To browse the collection (many are not listed in IUCAT), ask the Lilly’s Reading Room attendant for the Shelf List call number PN6120 .S42 for a complete alphabetical list of scripts with detailed descriptions. Copying of any kind is prohibited without prior permission of the studio and/or the script’s author.

David K. Frasier, Reference Librarian, Lilly Library

Fig. 1. Artist sketch of the spider fight sequence in The Incredible Shrinking Man (Universal-International Pictures, 1957).

Fig. 2. Closely corresponding scene from the film with actor Grant Williams.

Fig. 3. Sample page from The Exorcist script (PN6120 .S42 E97) written by William Peter Blatty from his 1971 novel featuring dialogue not used in the original 1973 Warner Bros. release.