Accessibility Tip: Helping Dyslexic Users

Here’s a group of users we often forget about when we consider making our web pages accessible: dyslexic readers. Dyslexia is a fairly common disability, and we no doubt have quite a few folks in the IU community who live with it.

There are some easy guidelines we can follow when creating web pages that will make them easier for people with dyslexia – and for others, too – to read. Check out this very clear and helpful article from UXMovement: 6 Surprising Bad Practices That Hurt Dyslexic Users. And then read this response from someone who is actually dyslexic, outlining what actually works for them (which may not hold true for every person with dyslexia): A Dyslexic’s Thoughts on Webpages

Questions or comments about this or other web accessibility issues? We’d love to hear from you – leave a comment on this post, or get in touch with anyone from DUX!

Bookmarking Services

Yahoo! caused quite a stir back in December when it announced that the company was planning on sunsetting its social bookmarking service, Delicious. Yahoo! has expressed its commitment to keeping Delicious active until it is sold, but many users have started looking for other options. Although the announcement serves as a reminder of the ephemerality of many online services, it has also created an opportunity for upstart companies to assert themselves on the market. Below is a listing of alternatives that might meet your needs. I use Pinboard myself. It’s quick, simple, charges a small fee, and is profitable. Which means it will be around forever, right?

Post a comment if I missed a bookmarking service that you find particularly useful!

Pinboard

Zootool

Google Bookmarks

Diigo

Instapaper (great for archiving articles)

Readability (also great for archiving)

Xmarks

Mister Wong

Accessibility Tip: Using the “alt” tag

Whether you are uploading your image via the Content Manager’s image upload widget or linking it in some other way, one of the necessary HTML attributes for any image is the alt tag. The text in your alt tag is used by screen readers, so that people who access the web using this assistive technology will be able to get the information that you are conveying in your image.

Userfocus has published an absolutely terrific post outlining five different ways to use alt text, and when you should use each kind. Read it here.