17 More Essential Altmetrics Resources (the Library Version)

As promised, I have compiled some “required reading” related specifically to altmetrics and their use in libraries. These articles and blog posts actually comprise a majority of the writing out there on altmetrics in libraries–there’s surprisingly little that librarians have written to date on how our profession might use altmetrics to enhance our work.

Ironically enough (given librarians’ own OA advocacy), some of the articles linked below have been published in toll access library science journals. Apologies in advance for any paywalls you may encounter. (Though if you do find barriers to access, you should tell OA Button about it!)

General

Collection Development

Research Data Curation

  • Weber, N. M., Thomer, A. K., Mayernik, M. S., Dattore, B., Ji, Z., & Worley, S. (2013). The Product and System Specificities of Measuring Curation Impact. International Journal of Digital Curation, 8(2).  doi:10.2218/ijdc.v8i2.286

Institutional Repositories

  • Day, M., & Michael Day. (2004). Institutional repositories and research assessment. Project Report. UKOLN, University of Bath. (pp. 1–30). Bath: University of Bath. Retrieved from http://opus.bath.ac.uk/23308/
  • Frank Scholz, S. D. (2006). International Workshop on Institutional Repositories and Enhanced and Alternative Metrics of Publication Impact. CERN. Retrieved from http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/series/dini-schriften/2006-8/PDF/8.pdf
  • Konkiel, S., & Scherer, D. (2013). New opportunities for repositories in the age of altmetrics. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 39(4), 22–26. doi:10.1002/bult.2013.1720390408
  • Merceur, F., Gall, M. Le, Salaün, A., & Le Gall, M. (2011). Bibliometrics: a new feature for institutional repositories. In 14th Biennal EURASLIC Meeting (pp. 1–21). Lyon. Retrieved from http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00031/14253/11886.pdf
  • Organ, M. K. (2006). Download Statistics – What Do They Tell Us? The Example of Research Online, the Open Access Institutional Repository at the University of Wollongong, Australia. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved February 13, 2012, from http://ro.uow.edu.au/asdpapers/44/

Do you have “must read” articles relating to libraries and altmetrics that didn’t make it on this list? Leave ’em in the comments below!

Want to read some general altmetrics-related research? Check out the original list of 17 Essential Altmetrics Resources.

Simple Steps to Manage Your Data More Effectively

Data management can be an intimidating topic. However, learning how to manage your data can improve your research processes and therefore your life! Not to mention the fact that many grant funding agencies now require data management plans to be submitted with proposals. Is your interest piqued yet? Read below for some easy first steps toward managing your data.

Consider your current data practices

Here are some preliminary questions to ask yourself.

  • What data do I collect?
  • Do I follow a process for collecting and documenting my data?
  • Who contributes data–just me or others, too?
  • What format is the data in?
  • Where is the data stored?
  • Is the data being backed up?

Determine areas to improve

Compare the following suggestions to your own data practices. If you can start taking steps to improve the weaker areas, you’ll be all set.

  • Documentation – Document the processes and workflows you follow when collecting and managing your data in a README file (click here for a good example). It is also important to follow standards within your field for documenting contextual information about your data. In library jargon, this is known as metadata. To search for a metadata standard in your discipline, try the Digital Curation Centre’s helpful search tool.
  • Formats – Ideally, data should be stored in open, non-proprietary formats. This will ensure that it can be accessed well into the future. The Open Data Handbook gives a good overview of open formats. This can be as simple as saving files as a CSV instead of Excel spreadsheet or a text file instead of Microsoft word document.
  • Storage – IU offers several options for data storage. You can store your data on the cloud through IU Box, which also provides excellent versioning and collaborative functionality. For sensitive or large data sets, you can use the Scholarly Data Archive. Whatever you do, just make sure that you are backing up your data and not just relying on your hard drive to keep your data safe. Also note that these options do not ensure long-term preservation. For this, you should consider adding completed data sets to the IU institutional repository, IUScholarWorks (IUSW).
  • Sharing and Access Opening up your data won’t be appropriate for all researchers, but those whose research is complete should consider storing their data in IUSW to promote discoverability and access to their data.

Get help

Data management advice is nearly impossible to generalize, especially in a short blog post! Contact Stacy Konkiel, Science Data Management Librarian, at skonkiel@indiana.edu with questions, comments, or to schedule a one-on-one consultation about how the IU Libraries Data Management Service can help you manage your data.

What Open Access Means to Me

On October 21-25, IU celebrated International Open Access Week with a series of events to reflect on and educate the IU community about open access, including workshops, presentations, and round table discussions on topics ranging from data management to student publishing. As part of this series, we asked faculty and students to answer the question “What does open access mean to you?” and compiled their responses here.

To wrap up the discussion, I thought I would use this post to share my own response:

Open access offers something for everyone. For librarians and users, it creates a sustainable model of scholarly communication that fosters equal access to information. For universities and funding agencies, it accelerates research, supporting the mission to advance knowledge creation. For researchers and their home institutions, it creates an unparalleled opportunity for impact.

As a graduate student in the Department of Information and Library Science, I am excited by the ways libraries are playing an increasing role in the open access movement by providing open access publishing services, supporting institutional repositories, preserving open access materials through LOCKSS, and more. I strongly believe that the principles of open access align with the core values of librarianship, and it is something that I am proud to be a part of.

If you are interested in learning more about open access, the following list of resources is a great place to get started: