Using Podcasts and Videos for Scholarly Communication

In recent years, many libraries have started to promote their resources and engage with patrons, the local community, and the larger world through social media. This is perhaps most obvious on Twitter–our own IU Libraries has a strong presence at @iulibraries and @hermanbwells. Still, there are other platforms, including Instagram and Snapchat, that are key for engaging  younger library patrons. Both the Herman B Wells account and the Lilly Library account have worked hard to make information about the library accessible and relevant via these platforms.

Podcasts are becoming yet another new and exciting avenue for informing researchers, students, and other library patrons of library services and engaging them with the complexities of 21st century library work. These kinds of podcasts—either hosted by or focused on librarians/libraries—are becoming increasingly popular. Some of my favorites include the Public Library Association’s podcast, the librarian-run All Booked Up and The Librarian is In and  the American Library Association’s Dewey Decibel Podcast. Last fall, the Scholarly Communication Department experimented with podcasting and capturing audio testimony through a series of interviews. The goal of podcasting was to make the concept of open access more approachable and understandable to all patrons. The podcasts were also an opportunity to zoom in on specific services the department offers and better understand how those services impact the IU community at large.

The department decided to position these podcasts around the theme of Open Access and Open Education, which are valuable commitments to us (and libraries as a whole!). In that spirit, we narrowed the interviewees down to three people: Willa Liburd Tavernier, the Open Scholarship Resident and Visiting Assistant Librarian at IU Bloomington; Michael Morrone, Senior Lecturer at the Kelley School of Business and editor of IU Libraries Open Access Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; and Brant Ellsworth, Assistant Professor of Humanities at Central Penn College and editor of IU Open Access Journal Children’s Folklore Review.

Working with the IU Faculty Media Production Space, we interviewed each person, recording both video and audio. Capturing video allowed us to take important clips and put them on Instagram and YouTube. Samuel Underwood in Collaboration Technology and Classroom Support was integral in helping us edit and these clips, which cover everything from the diversity and accessibility of the open access movement to recognizing that students lose access to scholarly research:

Anyone interested in starting an OA journal or learning more about IU Libraries Journal Publishing Program will also be interested in:

Finally, full audio clips are available for anyone who would like to listen. These clips offer listeners more information about the importance of open access and highlight how journals can make the leap to OA :

The Scholarly Communication Department is excited about reaching researchers and students in new ways. Questions? E-mail iusw@indiana.edu.