Sharing Dissertations Beyond the PDF in IUScholarWorks

This blog already provides a summary of the benefits of making your dissertation available in IUScholarWorks as well as details on how to submit your dissertation to the repository. But what if your dissertation is more than a PDF file? What if it includes video, dynamic web content, or other interactive media? IUScholarWorks can still serve as a space for making your work available for anyone around the world to read, regardless of their affiliation. 

We generally call non-traditional, born-digital dissertations “digital dissertations.” Digital dissertations could be as simple as including an extra video or data file alongside a more traditional piece of scholarship or as complex as having a dissertation completely hosted on a dynamic web platform with accompanying text files. Digital dissertations are becoming more widespread as digital scholarship and digital humanities continue to gain momentum. Here are just a few examples and excerpts of what we’re calling digital dissertations: 

Digital dissertations might include capturing performances, integrating images and audio records, modeling concepts with 3D figures, sharing the underlying data behind the research reported in the dissertation, and building new web content that allows the author to organize information in a non-linear structure. 

It’s important to note that while IUScholarWorks is able to host several different types of content and file formats (PDFs, Word documents, text documents, Open Office, slide decks, image formats) and we have creative workarounds for capturing the content in digital dissertations, there are some limitations. Sometimes, particularly with dissertations that are built as websites, the navigation of content is just as important as the content itself and is considered part of the dissertation. While we will be unable to perfectly preserve the navigation and look/feel of a particular website, we can host a majority of the content through alternative methods. We can also capture the “pieces” of most sites, including videos (through Media Collections Online), data, and 3D objects. 

Interested in sharing your digital dissertation? 

 

Two New Graduate Students Join the the Scholarly Communication Department

The Scholarly Communication Department is happy to introduce our two new graduate assistants, Alexis Murrell and Matt Vaughn. Both have recently began the master’s program for Information and Library Science (ILS) in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering.

Picture of Alexis Murrell with diploma

Alexis recently graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor of Arts in Public Relations and Strategic Communication and a minor in English. She is currently pursuing a Masters in Library Science with a focus in Rare Books and Manuscripts. In addition to her work for the Scholarly Communications Department, she also works as the Cataloging and Processing Assistant for the Federal Depository Library Program. Her interests are strongly centered around special collections librarianship and donor relations.

Headshot of Matt Vaughn

Matt is pursuing a Masters in Library Science with a specialization in digital humanities. He has a research background in American literature, and instructional experience in English composition and leadership development. He has also worked as an editorial assistant with the Modernist Journals Project and the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies. His current research interests include creating digital resources for literary archives and exploring the role of libraries in language preservation.

We are looking forward to having Matt and Alexis on our team, and can’t wait for them to contribute to our programming and services. Please join us in welcoming them to our department!