Navigating Course Material Services at IU Libraries

In response to the ongoing global public health crisis, universities across the country are embracing remote learning models that utilize digital resources. With most instruction occurring virtually, IU students need easily accessible and affordable digital course materials now more than ever. If you are experiencing challenges obtaining course materials, the IU Libraries Scholarly Communication Department provides resources to help instructors in all disciplines find and evaluate digital course materials. 

Student reading a book in the library
Image courtesy of Indiana University.

In a recent video, our graduate assistant Matt Vaughn outlines the options and services that instructors have for selecting course materials. These include:

Open Educational Resources

Open Educational Resources (OER) are digital course materials that you can legally customize to fit your needs. Open textbooks can help alleviate the burden of textbook costs for students and provide faculty with content that can be customized for their courses and used freely. The library can assist you with finding, evaluating, and creating these freely available materials. To learn more about OER options, explore this resource guide or contact Scholarly Communication Librarian Sarah Hare.

Temporarily Available Academic Resources – In addition to traditional open educational resources, many vendors and publishers are making scholarly content temporarily available for free during the ongoing pandemic. Discover these ever-changing materials here.

Analyzing Resources for Fair Use 

Another option to consider, especially if you normally use a physical book in your course or your students frequently utilize course reserves in person, is fair use. Fair use is a legal doctrine that permits the unlicensed use of copyright-protected works in certain circumstances. 

Fair use is important if you are considering scanning large portions of a book or journal for your students to access in Canvas. Generally, we recommend that you link to electronic book chapters, but you can upload PDFs of journal articles after you have downloaded them from a library database. IU has resources to help instructors analyze their intended use of copyrighted materials and to make informed decisions about use. For more information, explore this resource guide or contact Naz Pantaloni, Copyright Program Librarian.

Scanning Print Materials

After confirming that copyrighted materials may be used via fair use analysis, the Document Delivery Service unit can help you create digital scans of print materials for Canvas use via the Request Article Delivery program. You can use this service by accessing your Interlibrary Loan (ILL) account and completing the request form.

Finding and Acquiring Library Databases and eBooks

Lastly, IU Libraries may be able to obtain new materials to support your courses. Instructors can request that the Libraries purchase an eBook, a journal subscription, or access to an electronic resource via the Request A Purchase Form. It is important to note that you will need to send students to the eBook publisher’s platform to read these books, and publishers sometimes impose limits on printing and the number of simultaneous users. 

A number of library databases also include media particularly relevant to classroom use. Kanopy, for example, provides access to a wide range of films and documentaries. It can be helpful to discuss eBook and database options with your subject librarian in order to ensure long-term access for your students. 

For more information about these digital resources, visit the IU Libraries services page, contact your subject librarian, or reach out to the Scholarly Communication Department at iusw@indiana.edu.

IUSW Chalk Talks Explain Information Creation in Academia

IUScholarWorks houses course materials for numerous lectures and seminars across campus. While this content is typically created for a specific class discussion, many of these materials are continually applicable to students outside of the course they were originally created for. One collection of course materials that is particularly useful for research and information literacy instruction in all disciplines is the EDUC-L700 Course Materials collection. This collection consists of seven chalk talks related to information creation in academia, designed by Dr. Beth Samuelson and librarians Julie Marie Frye and Sarah Hare. The conversations highlighted in these videos relate directly to the work we do in the Scholarly Communication Department and provide a great introduction to the development of open access initiatives in higher education. Specifically, the fifth, sixth, and seventh chalk talks investigate the role of journals in academia and how the journal publishing environment has impacted information access over time. 

Video 5 Journals in Higher Education discusses the history of journal publishing and how higher education’s reliance on high-impact journal publishing has affected the evolution of this ecosystem. High-impact journals play a crucial role in faculty and institutional evaluation. An academic’s reputation and case for tenure improves when they publish in a top tier journal. Their university also benefits through improved institutional rankings, which leads to a stronger reputation and higher enrollments. Unfortunately, some publishers have now exploited this need in higher education.

Video 6 Inequities in the Ecosystem explains that while publishers enhance journal articles through editing, typesetting, and indexing and warrant compensation for this work, they have built a business model on scholarly works that have been submitted, reviewed, and edited at no cost to them. They have been able to then sell these works back to institutions for extremely high prices through library subscriptions. Moreover, they often restrict how authors can use their work, usually through publishing agreement terms and paywalls. This expensive content is only accessible by select institutions, creating disparities in information access even  in higher education. Additionally, this content is often impossible to obtain by community members not associated with an institution due to its price. This has created a space in which information inequity and privilege exist. 

Video 7 Transforming the Information Ecosystem highlights how, in the past two decades, institutions have reconstructed this narrative and used their power to promote inclusive access to information. Many government officials, administrators, faculty, librarians, and students are now working together to create models and incentives that both transform scholarly publishing and change the disparity dynamic to create a more equitable information ecosystem. Specifically, many institutions are embracing open scholarship practices to challenge this information inequity. At IU, we have implemented numerous open access policies and initiatives to create barrier-free information access, including:

Most recently, IUB Libraries and IUPUI Libraries, with support from the Women’s Philanthropy Leadership Council (WPLC), have created a Course Material Transformation Fellowship Program for instructors interested in adopting or creating affordable course materials. In addition to getting involved with any number of IU’s open access initiatives, faculty are encouraged to publish their works open access, use OA publications in their courses, and empower students to use open access materials in their assignments and research. Each of these actions will shift the unbalanced journal publishing environment mentioned in Video 5 and combat the inequalities in information access discussed in Video 6. You can find these chalk talks, along with others in the collection in IUScholarWorks. For more information about the open scholarship services available to IU affiliates, visit our website or contact us at IUSW@indiana.edu

Remixing Our Collections Recap

On February 6th, IU Libraries hosted Remixing Our Collections: Selections from Indiana, a two-hour exhibit that featured artist books, ethnographic field recordings and popular music, maps, photographs, books, and films drawn from library and campus special collections. The goal of the exhibit was to highlight contemporary art, culture, and scholarship in Indiana. This exhibit was held as part of Indiana Remixed, a semester long celebration of contemporary arts and ideas that shape Indiana today.

The Scholarly Communication Department highlighted articles from Indiana Magazine of History, one of our open access journals. From articles like Dawn Bakken’s “What is a Hoosier?” to Nancy Gabin’s “Bossy Ladies: Toward a History of Wage-Earning Women in Indiana”, the selections explored Indiana’s rich history and past challenges and used this historical perspective to broach contemporary issues and creative growths occurring in this area. We also showcased items from our institutional repository, IUScholarWorks. Andrew Wylie’s family correspondence and Jon Kay’s “Indiana Folk Arts: 200 Years of Tradition and Innovation” were among the items highlighted from the repository. These works give a comprehensive look into the types of works we are able to preserve in IUScholarWorks. More importantly, they provide a small glimpse of what life was like in Indiana throughout time and highlight Indiana University’s efforts to preserve the creative endeavors of Indiana thinkers, writers, and artists. 

Additional exhibit displays included:

media services display, including fliers, buttons, bookmarks, DVDs
IU Libraries Media Services’ display at Remixing Our Collections

Other library departments involved in Remixing Our Collections included the Scholars’ Commons, the Sciences Library, the Business/SPEA Information Commons, and the IU Archives of African American Music and Culture

With an entire semester of performances, film screenings, guest speakers, and exhibits, Indiana Remixed explores and questions the ways we create art, community, and meaning in our state. From nationally acclaimed authors and artists to celebrated chefs and performers, visiting guests will share a diverse array of perspectives and backgrounds united by their common experience of life as Hoosiers. Visit the Indiana Remixed webpage for more information about the program and a complete list of upcoming events

To view more articles from the Indiana Magazine of History and other open access journals relating to Indiana and Indiana University, visit the Scholarly Communication Department’s open journals page.  

OA Impact Week: Raising Your Research Profile Workshop Recap

On October 24, 2019, the IU Libraries Scholarly Communications Department partnered with the Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity & Inclusion, the Center of Excellence for Women & Technology, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs to hold a workshop, “Raising Your Research Profile”  that discussed Open Scholarship at IU as well as opportunities available for faculty and graduate students to increase their research profiles. This presentation was held as part of International Open Access Week, a week for institutions around the globe to facilitate events and initiatives that raise awareness about open access and empower faculty, staff, and students to get involved.

This year’s OA Week theme was  “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge.” The key concepts behind this theme involve the assessment of open information accessibility and the assurance that every individual is able to participate in open scholarship without barriers. These ideas guide much of our work in the Scholarly Communication Department, with particular interest in equity among the open scholarship contributors. It is important to ensure that every individual is able to contribute his/her research to open access sources so that there is a diverse range of materials available. It was this goal that inspired the workshop. We strive to diversify the voices heard in academic research, and in order to do this it is crucial that we include the work of those who are currently underrepresented. IU scholars are creating excellent, ground-breaking research, and it’s important to draw attention to their work and provide them with the tools and services necessary to share it openly.

At the workshop, Scholarly Communication Librarian Sarah Hare discussed the opportunities for faculty and staff involvement with open access at IU, mentioning specifically the CV Service. With this service, IU Bloomington researchers are to make the full-text of their CV open access and available to all via IUScholarWorks. This service enables you to make as many items as possible from your CV open access conveniently and without breaking your existing copyright agreement. Additionally, depositing your work with IUScholarWorks can create opportunities for career advancement, as the visibility of your work is increased. 

Open Scholarship Resident Willa Liburd Tavernier discussed research impact and how you can utilize IUScholarWorks to increase your visibility, which often leads to increased citation rates. Depositors can take advantage of this along with IUScholarWorks’ built-in metrics – which allow you to see how many times you page has been viewed or downloaded – to expand their academic profile. The Scholarly Communication Department can help you create and manage scholarly profiles profile, including Google Scholar and ORCID, track the impact of your work using online tools, and much more

Our hope is that by increasing the visibility of all scholars and their research we can work toward a future where not only is information open, but where participation is open to all. By striving for this equity, we can shape the foundation of our systems for creating and sharing knowledge to be inclusive, diverse, and reflective of users. 

 

Interested in making your scholarship open in our institutional repository? Contact IUSW@indiana.edu

Find the presentation slides in our institutional repository: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/24692