New Monographic Series Launched in IUScholarWorks: Ethnomusicology Translations

IUScholarWorks is excited to announce the launch of Ethnomusicology Translations, a new monographic series that publishes ethnomusicological literature translated into English.  I interviewed Steve Stuempfle, Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations, about his experiences initiating this online publication series and he graciously answered a few of my questions:

Erica Hayes: What is Ethnomusicology Translations and how did it get started?

Steve Stuempfle:  Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer-reviewed, open-access online series for the publication of ethnomusicological literature translated into English. The series is published by the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), an organization founded in 1955 to promote research and study of all forms of music and their cultural contexts. For several years, the SEM membership has been calling for increased access to ethnomusicological scholarship across language barriers. We assembled an editorial team to pursue this endeavor and, thanks to a partnership with Indiana University Libraries, obtained a publishing platform. Our hope is that the new publication will be read not only by ethnomusicologists but by scholars from other fields and by anyone with an interest in music around the world.

How long have you been involved with Ethnomusicology Translations and in what capacity?

I have been working on translations initiatives at SEM since joining the organization as Executive Director in 2008. Over the past couple of years, I have been serving as Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations. My job is to address publication logistics, while the editorial team handles content.

Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer reviewed, open access online series. What made you adopt an open access model for this publication series and partner with IU Libraries?

We adopted an open-access model in order to reach as wide an audience as possible. A fundraising campaign at SEM has provided monies for translating, while our editorial team is volunteering their time. We partnered with Indiana University Libraries because of its success in offering quality scholarly publications through IUScholarWorks.

Who can nominate articles for inclusion in Ethnomusicology Translations and what is the nomination process?

Anyone can nominate an article to Ethnomusicology Translations by emailing General Editor Richard Wolf at rwolf@fas.harvard.edu. For brief nomination guidelines, see http://www.ethnomusicology.org/?Pub_EthnoTrans. Accepted nominations are assigned to a manuscript editor and then to a translator.

What are your plans for Ethnomusicology Translations over the next few years?

Our goal for the next few years is to publish translations of important ethnomusicological articles from a wide range of languages. Since Ethnomusicological Translations is a monograph series, rather than a journal, translated articles can be published at any time—as soon as they have gone through the peer review and editorial process. Each issue of Ethnomusicology Translation is a single article.

Open Access Week 2015

It’s that time of year again!  On October 19th-23rd, IU Bloomington will celebrate Open Access Week 2015.  Open Access Week is a great opportunity for students, faculty, and librarians to learn more about the potential benefits of open access scholarship and research.  In lieu of this year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration,” IU Bloomington has put together a great series of workshops with speakers from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research, Indiana University Press, and the IU Libraries.  Topics of discussion will include data management, academic publishing for early-career researchers, journal publishing agreements, and more.  All are encouraged to attend and learn from each other!

See below for a detailed list of workshops to be held during Open Access Week 2015:

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Wells W144 | 3pm-4pm
Open Lab: IUScholarWorks

  • Shayna Pekala and Richard Higgins, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Wells E159 | 3pm-4pm
What You Need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Wells E159 | 12pm-1pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

 Friday, October 23, 2015 | Wells E158 | 11am-1pm
Data Management 101 (Lunch included)

  • Heather Coates, Michelle Dalmau, and Jennifer Laherty, Indiana University Libraries
  • Tassie Gniady and Sofia McDowell, Office of Research Compliance
  • Kristy Kallback-Rose, UITS Research Technologies
  • Jennifer Guiliano, Department of History, IUPUI
  • Kalani Craig, Department of History, IUB

Fall 2015 Academic Publishing Workshop Series

The Office of Scholarly Publishing will be hosting a series of Academic Publishing workshops this fall semester.  Topics of discussion will include how to navigate the world of academic publishing, book proposal writing, journal publishing agreements, and preparing a scholarly journal.  Faculty and students planning to publish their research are encouraged to attend!

You may sign up for any of the following workshops and view the complete schedule, including abstracts at http://iub.libcal.com/

Here is the list of workshops being offered:

Monday, September 28, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 1:00pm-2:00pm
How to Write a Book Proposal

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press

Monday, October 5, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 1pm-2pm
How to Start a Scholarly Journal

  • Shayna Pekala, Indiana University Libraries
  • Michael Regoli, Indiana University Press

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ-Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Psychological & Brain Sciences Faculty

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 3pm-4pm
What You need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 12pm-1:30pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 10:30am-12:00pm
Copyright, Fair Use, and Permissions (for Journal Editors)

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Analytics for IUScholarWorks is now here!

Hi, I am Pallavi Murthy and I will be working for IUScholarWorks under Scholarly Communications as a Graduate Assistant through fall 2013 and spring 2014. This is my first blog and I am very excited to start off my job with multiple duties at hand! Well, let me put it this way- I am very happy to work on something I really love- Data and Analytics!

To say that data analysis is important to business will be an understatement. In fact, no business can survive without analyzing available data. Data analysis is the lifeline of any business. Whether one wants to arrive at some marketing decisions or fine-tune new product launch strategy, data analysis is the key to all the problems. What is the importance of data analysis – instead, one should say what is not important about data analysis. Merely analyzing data isn’t sufficient from the point of view of making a decision. How does one interpret from the analyzed data is more important. Thus, data analysis is not a decision making system, but decision supporting system. Data analysis can offer the following benefits:

  • Structuring the findings from survey research or other means of data collection
  • Break a macro picture into a micro one
  • Acquiring meaningful insights from the dataset
  • Basing critical decisions from the findings
  • Ruling out human bias through proper statistical treatment. [1]

Libraries can use data analysis for many of the same functions that businesses do. My first project for IUScholarWorks was to perform such an analysis on their website.

Said and done, I am using Google Analytics to analyze the Libraries Website, specifically website traffic related to Data Management. I am also analyzing web traffic for Journals under IU Libraries, including JoSoTL and JoTLT, which  the IUScholarWorks team has put a great deal of time and effort into maintaining.

Stacy asked me to review the data management guide so she can better understand which parts of her guide are the most accessed. The Data Management Guide has seen significant improvement since it was created. Describing Data with Metadata ranks highest as the most accessed sup-page under Data Management at IU, followed by Storage and preservation and Funder Requirements and Data Management Plans.

Next, Stacy asked me to run the analytics for Publication and Data Services webpage, so she could understand if people were using that webpage to find their way to IUScholarWorks. The report shows that IUScholarWorks Repository, Journal Publishing and Data Management Services is one of the most popular link on that page.

It is interesting and delighting to know how IUScholarWorks is trying very hard to make scholarly research and journals open access. I feel as important the efforts for making open access is, so important it is to know the whereabouts of the efforts actually reaching to its users. I would like to analyze more and more reports and bring in some valuable data wonder (as I call it!) in my next upcoming blogs.

To know more about IUScholarWorks, Depositing your scholarly research, Publishing an online journal and Archive and increasing availability of your research data visit http://scholarworks.iu.edu/.

For more information contact the IUScholarWorks team.

Sources:  [1]* http://www.migindia.biz/data.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

(#18) Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

We began last month exploring why copyright plays in important role in scholarly communication by looking at one case – publishing.  Copyright also plays important roles in other ways that scholars do their work.  As Clifford Lynch has said, “The most fundamental part of research, teaching, and scholarly discourse is the ability to build upon both evidence and prior scholarship.” (Center for Intellectual Property Handbook, p. 154) This building upon requires both access to the material as well as the ability to use portions of it to build your own case, make an argument against it, or to perhaps to establish a common understanding within your field.  This ability to use other works is not just important; it is, to use Cliff’s word, fundamental.

Many of the questions that I receive are about the use of others’ copyrighted work.  Can I include this image in my paper?  Can I show this film clip in my class?  Many of these questions rely on those limitations I also touched upon last time.  To recap: Section 106 of the copyright law goes about defining the exclusive rights of authors and creators.  Sections 107 through 122 are about setting limits on those exclusive rights.  These are not exceptions to copyright law.  These are statute defined limitations on the exclusive rights of the author.  I believe this is a very important distinction as exceptions are generally thought of as a thing to be gotten rid of, but defined limitations has a very different connotation.

Scholars rely on many of these limitations in order to do their work.  The most frequently used sections of the copyright law in higher education are Sections 107 (the fair use section), Section 108 (specifically for libraries and archives), and Section 110 (deals with teaching).  These are not the only parts of the law that scholars rely on, but probably the most heavily used.  More on each of these in future posts.  For now, let’s just think about how important it is to have the ability to build upon the scholarship of others, teach about developments in a field, or to freely read about these areas of our choosing.

(#15) Copyright as the Center of the (Scholarly Communication) Universe

Whenever people think about Scholarly Communication, the first thing that comes to mind is probably not copyright.  They might think about the rising cost of journal subscriptions or new publishing methods or even think of putting their work on the web or in an institutional repository.  And while these are all valid first thoughts, copyright is generally only thought of after the fact.  Copyright should be a lot higher on the list for consideration.  Why?  Because copyright is the center of the scholarly communication universe!  And I’m not just saying that as the intellectual property librarian.  Ok, well maybe a little.  So, why is copyright so important in the scholarly communication universe?

Under US Copyright Law (US Code, Title 17), Section 106 grants authors certain exclusive rights as soon as they put their work into a fixed, tangible medium.  Sections 107 through 122 go about setting limitations on those exclusive rights, but for now, let’s just focus on the exclusive rights.  These rights include the ability to reproduce the copyrighted work, prepare derivative works, distribute the work, and display or perform the work publicly.  An author may share their work publicly on a web page or at a meeting or in any venue on their own as a means of spreading their work.  However, many authors want to publish their research or creative activity in a book or a journal in order to share their work.

For a publisher to make this work available, they must get permission from the author in order to reproduce (make copies) and distribute (in print or electronically) the author’s work as these are, up to this point, the exclusive rights belonging to the author.  This is where publishing agreements and copyright transfer agreements come in.  Some publishers have a policy in place that says that by sending them the article you are agreeing to have it published by them.  Thus, you are giving them permission.  Some publishers require not only permission, but an exclusive transfer of the copyright to them.  The transfer is exclusive in that the right was transferred and not retained by the author.  Exclusive transfers of copyright must be in writing, so this is why it is important to read the copyright transfer agreement carefully before you sign it.  Once an author exclusively transfers these rights, the author no longer has them.  This has many implications for the author and should be carefully considered.  For example, the author would generally no longer be able to reproduce or distribute their own paper without permission from the copyright owner (who is now the publisher) or by relying on another statute such as fair use.

There are arguments why an exclusive transfer is a good thing, and also arguments as to why they are a bad thing.  I’m not going there at the moment as this is a blog post and not a dissertation (although this is getting rather long).  Let’s suffice to say that ALL publishing requires at a minimum the permission of the original author.  This fact alone is why copyright plays such a central role in the way that scholars share their work from the publishing end of things.  Copyright plays important roles in other ways that scholars do their work, not just in publishing.  Think teaching, research, and other means of scholarly discourse.  I’ll be exploring these roles in a series of blog posts the first Monday of the month because copyright is just that important!  I hope you’ll join in the discussion.

(#12) We’re Growing!

We are very happy to have two new employees join our ranks!

We are very happy to announce that Stacy Konkiel accepted the E-Science Librarian position effective January 17.  Stacy was formerly a Marketing Associate
for the Public Library of Science (PLoS) in San Francisco where she led efforts
to market PLoS journals to a wide range of international scientific communities,
and supported research and development for Article-Level Metrics and data sharing initiatives.  Prior to working for PLoS, Stacy was the Digital Repository Resident
Librarian for ScholarWorks at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.  Stacy received her MLS and MIS from IU in 2008.  As the E-Science Librarian, Stacy will be responsible for working with various groups across campus to develop policies, sustainable services, and infrastructure to enable faculty and students to preserve and make available their research data.

We are also very happy to have Ryan Cobine join IUScholarWorks with a temporary half-time assignment that also began in January.  Ryan will focus his efforts and talents on staff and user training and documentation.  He is currently the VIVO Pilot Coordinator in
Library Technologies and Digital Libraries and will continue in that role at half-time. Ryan has a long history of providing excellent instructional services within UITS and other units of IU Bloomington.

Please join us in welcoming our newest members to the team.

(#11) FAR and IUScholarWorks

Have you noticed in the Faculty Annual Report (FAR), there is a check-box labeled ScholarWorks?  This check-box appears when you record your publications, creative activities, conference presentations, and even service activities.  By checking the
ScholarWorks button, you are indicating that you are interested in placing the
corresponding publication, presentation, etc. into IUScholarWorks, the digital
repository hosted by the IU Libraries (see https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/).  By placing your work in the repository, you will gain increased visibility to your research and the work will be assigned a permanent, stable URL for easy linking and dissemination.  In order for a paper, powerpoint presentation, poster, or other material to be deposited into the repository, you must own the copyright to the material or have permission to make it
available.  Note for journal publications, this often means that that the publisher’s PDF copy of the article is generally not allowed, although a pre-print version may be.  If you are interested in increasing access to your work, while having the libraries be responsible for the long-term maintenance to it, then check the ScholarWorks button when you fill out this year’s FAR.  A librarian will contact you to discuss your work and to get copies
of the work for deposit.  If you have any questions regarding this process
or about IUScholarWorks, please feel free to contact us at IUSW@indiana.edu.

 

(#10) View from the GA – A Reading on Copyright

Sherri Michaels and Jennifer Laherty have given me a series of readings about institutional repositories and the issues that affect them. I will be periodically posting my thoughts about these readings.

Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums, by Peter Hirtle, Emily Hudson, and Andrew T. Kenyon goes over copyright law as it affects and applies to digitization projects at libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions. This very detailed manual covers all the law’s parts and exemptions, with discussions of how they’ve changed over time. It also touches on trademark and privacy issues, especially as they apply to audio-visual materials. The text contains plenty of examples and case histories throughout, which keeps the discussions grounded in the real activities and problems of cultural institutions and their digitization projects. Hirtle, Hudson, and Kenyon have also included many tables, flowcharts, and checklists to help break down and map out the various steps and issues in dealing with copyright and permissions.
I found Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums extremely illuminating and helpful. The book was very well-organized and the progression through topics and parts of copyright law was logical and elegant. It was very readable, and contained almost no legalese. The authors frame solutions and approaches to copyright issues in terms of risk and its management rather than as a series of inflexible rules. This book gave me a better and fuller understanding of what the requirements, exceptions, and pitfalls are for library digitization projects. In addition, I gained a good perspective on copyright issues in the non-profit and educational environments.

Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums is available for download at http://ecommons.library.cornell.edu/handle/1813/14142.

(#7) A View From the GA, Part 1

IUScholarWorks has a Graduate Assistant, Carol Lubkowski, to help us with many aspects of our work.  Carol’s job description is basically “other duties as assigned.”  We thought it would be interesting and useful to see things from Carol’s point of view occasionally, so this is the first of her posts.  Welcome Carol!

Before coming to IU and joining IU ScholarWorks as a Graduate Assistant, my previous experience with the concept of a digital repository was in a corporate context, at a Boston-based biotech company. I was working in records management there and the term and concept of a digital repository were just getting introduced. However, it was not aligned with the company’s existing corporate library. Thus, when I started as the Graduate Assistant for IU ScholarWorks, I understood the basic concept of a digital repository, but had a lot to discover. Within the academic world, an institutional repository addresses a wide variety of concerns and needs for scholarly communication, reflecting the increasing importance of digital formats and sources both inside and outside of the library. I am particularly excited by the ways in which institutional repositories can help disseminate dissertations and theses, and by the services they provide to researchers and authors.
IU ScholarWorks is working on getting the dissertations of IU doctoral students into our repository, which has exciting potential for both disseminating research and for bringing new researchers into IU. It is often very difficult for researchers to access dissertations – very few of them are available in print format on library shelves. Some are available on microfilm, and many must be requested either through interlibrary loan or directly from the author. Expanded, easier access to dissertations will make the most recent research available to the wider scholarly community. Not only will this help researchers, it also has the potential to attract new researchers to IU through our graduate programs. By having access to recent graduate work, prospective students can get a clearer picture of what IU’s programs can offer them and whether a department’s focus and strengths match their own research interests.
As someone who has several friends in academia, I am also excited by the services an institutional repository can provide to authors and researchers. The repository provides a permanent digital home for their work, accessible via the internet with a stable and permanent URL. This also gives the authors the advantage of using a system and location backed up by established and robust IT services and infrastructure. The repository can thus provide a convenient and reliable way for authors to make their work widely and freely available without forgoing the aegis of official institutional support and authority.