Easily transmit data, video, and large files to IUScholarWorks

If you produce large datasets, create video or images, develop software or custom virtual machines, or rely on large packages of files and data in your research, we are pleased to introduce you to a new wiki-based widget for transmitting your work to our repository team.

screen shot of widget
URL: https://wiki.dlib.indiana.edu/x/swRNHw

With true drag and drop functionality, the widget allows users to transmit files of almost any size, from a 500 MB .mp4 video to a 10+ GB bundled virtual machine. All material dropped on the window or uploaded by browsing to a file on your machine will be synced to a dedicated Box folder owned by the Scholarly Communications Department. From there, our staff can ensure your material is placed in the appropriate preservation environment and mapped correctly to one or more IUScholarWorks records.

The tool gives IU researchers an accessible and straightforward method for transmitting material for deposit. It will be useful for the deposit of big datasets as well as files that merely exceed the 25-50 MB limit imposed on email attachments. Even for those who prefer to self-submit their own datasets, the simplicity of the tool makes the process of pushing data files to the Scholarly Data Archive less demanding. This is especially true if you are dealing with transmitting multiple small files. Compressing and/or packaging them as a zip or tar file will enable a smoother upload.

For any questions about using this tool or to let us know what you’ve uploaded, contact us at iusw @ indiana (dot) edu.

Why DOI?

Oprah meme, everything gets a doiWhile many researchers have heard of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), some may not know why and when they should be used. The single most important characteristic of DOIs is that they can be attached to just about any digital, online research output. If something has a URL, or a specific location on the web, it can be assigned a DOI. The versatility of DOIs means they can be tied to journal articles, datasets, supplemental material and addendum; to video, audio, streaming media, and 3D objects; to theses, dissertations, technical reports, and visualizations. More recently, DOIs are being assigned to pre-prints of articles, acknowledging the pre-print’s role in some disciplines to be as valuable as the published version.

Why does this matter? As the APA Style Blog explains,

The DOI is like a digital fingerprint: Each article receives a unique one at birth, and it can be used to identify the article throughout its lifespan, no matter where it goes. (https://shar.es/1VECYv)

This digital fingerprint grows in importance as we move into an era that scholar Péter Jacsó has described as a “metadata mega mess.” Keyword searches by title or author in Google, for example, and even Google Scholar, which relies on mechanisms rather than unique IDs, often return inaccurate information: titles are attributed to the wrong authors, especially those with common names; citations of articles are mistaken for the original article; publication years become volume numbers; and a score of other inaccuracies. Researchers who rely on Google Scholar often quip that the service provides an easy way to begin a citation search, but that sources must be verified by DOI through Crossref and other registries. An article with a DOI reduces its risk of becoming lost in this “metadata mega mess” (Péter Jacsó, “Metadata mega mess in Google Scholar”, Online Information Review 2010: 34.1: 175-191, https://doi.org/10.1108/14684521011024191).

The second essential feature of the DOI is that it is persistent. As a unique identifier, it enables digital objects to be found anywhere, anytime with a one simple click on a link. This means that a paper or dataset is accessible and discoverable without requiring a separate search. Incorporated into a citation, the DOI becomes a guaranteed location for the item cited because it will always resolve to the right web address (URL). When attached to a resource, the DOI is also machine-readable, supporting online discovery as well as targeted aggregations and indexes.

The Anatomy of a DOI
Every DOI has three parts:

anatomy of a doi diagram
Source: http://www.ands.org.au/online-services/doi-service/doi-policy-statement. CC-BY
  • Resolving Web Address. Like web addresses (URLs), DOIs enable research output to be discoverable and accessible. Online publishing and digital archiving have made them almost a necessity for scholarship, and they have become the de facto standard for identifying research output.
  • Prefix. The prefix is the beginning of a unique, alphanumeric ID that irrefutably represents a digital object, and as such it creates an actionable, interoperable, persistent link to the work. The prefix is almost always associated with the entity or organization, and can allow users to trace the digital material back to its source.
  • Suffix. The final part of the alphanumeric ID is unique to its assigned object.  Integrity of DOIs are guaranteed because they do not rely alone on URLs and the web’s DNS (Domain Name System) servers for resolution. A DOI, then, is both an online location and a unique name and description of a specific digital object. Moreover, while the DOI base infrastructure is a species of the Handle System, DOIs run on a managed global network dedicated to their resolution.

A recent data DOI created for a data set in the IUScholarWorks repository (https://doi.org/10.5967/K8SF2T3M) illustrates one of our unique prefix “shoulders” (10.5967/K8) and a randomly generated alphanumeric string that is unique to this object (SF2T3M). Our open access journal system, on the other hand, is configured to create DOIs that are more semantic and tell us more about the object. This DOI (https://doi.org/10.14434/v17i3.21306) also has a unique prefix for Indiana University’s open journal system (10.14434). What’s more, the rest of the ID tells us that it is from Volume 17, Issue 3, article number 21306 of its originating journal.

So, Why DOI?
The short answer is that DOIs increase the reach and impact of your work. Publishers, repositories, aggregators, indexers, and providers of research and academic profiles are now relying on DOIs to identify specific works accurately, which in turn more reliably links that work to its authors and creators. Furthermore, metadata and information about individual works are increasingly tied to DOIs.

Crossref — one of the largest providers of DOIs for publications and the provider of DOIs for our open journal program — continues to expand the metadata that can be tied to DOIs, thereby increasing what your work can do in the world. The Scholarly Communication Department plans to deploy two specific Crossref programs that use DOIs to improve the accuracy and accessibility of usage data, bibliometrics, research profiles, and altmetric impact. Cited-by uses an object’s DOI to track where and how a digital publication or data has been cited, and can be displayed alongside an article with other metadata, such as authors’ bios (https://www.crossref.org/services/cited-by). Event Data, a program currently being rolled out by Crossref, goes even further. It will leverage the increasing ubiquity of DOIs to enhance the metrics available to scholars for their work. Known commonly as altmetrics, Event Data will collect a publication’s appearance on social media and online communities, such as Wikipedia, Reddit, Twitter, Stack Exchange, and blog posts (https://www.crossref.org/services/event-data).

Furthermore, for any research products — from software and datasets to technical reports and presentations –created and authored by IU faculty, staff, and students that do not have a previously assigned DOI, the IUScholarWorks Repository can mint them free-of-charge for any and all submissions.

Our New Scholarly Communication Librarian

headshot Sarah Crissinger The Scholarly Communication Department is delighted to announce the recent arrival of Sarah Crissinger, our new Scholarly Communication Librarian. Sarah will play a lead role in the implementation of IUB’s recently adopted Open Access Policy and oversee IU Libraries’ active journal publishing program. Look for future blog posts, programming, and outreach efforts by Sarah that highlight the Open Access Policy, student research, and the Office of Scholarly Publishing Journals, an open access publishing collaboration between IU Press and Scholarly Communication.

Sarah is a gifted teacher and communicator as well as a passionate advocate for Open Educational Resources (OER). Her research is focused on undergraduate scholarly communication outreach, critical open education practices, and LIS student development and agency. In her former position at Davidson College, she created open access programming and led two Open Educational Resource (OER) initiatives. She is currently co-authoring a chapter on inter-institutional collaborations to advance OER outreach for the forthcoming title, OER: A Field Guide for Academic Librarians. Sarah will also moderate a panel on OER for ACRL’s Science and Technology Section (STS) at ALA this June.

You can contact Sarah directly with questions, ideas, and/or suggestions by email, “scrissin at iu dot edu,” or through our contact form. More information about our team and the services provided by the Scholarly Communication department can be found at scholarworks.iu.edu and openscholarship.indiana.edu.

Open Access policy adopted by IU Bloomington faculty

The Bloomington Faculty Council unanimously approved an Open Access policy today that ensures that faculty scholarship will be accessible and available to the public for future generations. Open Access means that scholarly articles are regarded as the fruits of research that authors give to the world for the sake of inquiry and knowledge without expectation of payment. Adopting such a policy reduces barriers to research and learning by making research available on the public internet to be downloaded and shared freely, making it possible for scholarship to be more widely read and cited than literature that appears in closed-access, licensed journal databases. The policy can be found at IUB’s VPFAA site and an FAQ has been posted to our website.

The Scholarly Communication staff will be available to help authors deposit their work — usually the final version of an article that has gone through peer review — in IUScholarWorks or another repository for archival purposes. Indeed, as Nazareth Pantaloni, Copyright Librarian for the IU LIbraries, observed: “The Indiana University Libraries are delighted that the Bloomington Faculty Council has joined the over 300 U.S. colleges and universities who have decided to make their faculty’s scholarship more freely available under an Open Access policy. We look forward to working with them to accomplish that goal.” Faculty members may also contact us to opt-out of the policy, a process that will be incorporated into a one-click form once the policy is fully implemented.

The policy adopted today is only the latest step in an ongoing process at IU Bloomington. The BFC adopted one of the first Open Access policies in the country in March of 2004. That policy was actually a resolution in which the BFC decried the rising costs of academic journals and databases — at the time, 70% of a $9.2 million annual budget — and called on the IU Libraries to adopt several strategies in response, including, among other things, “to promote open scholarly communication.” That resolution served as an impetus for the Libraries’ development of IUScholarWorks. Today, IU ScholarWorks hosts nearly 30 Open Access journals, primarily in the humanities and social sciences, and serves as the repository for nearly 8,000 items deposited by IU Bloomington faculty, students, and staff, including data sets, conference proceedings, out-of-print books recovered by faculty from their original publishers, doctoral dissertations from the Jacobs School of Music, Patten Lectures, and a wide array of journal articles, research reports, other scholarly literature, and even creative works of authorship. Current developments include improvements in the repository’s ability to host multimedia content and data.

Open Access policies are intended, in part, to provide an institutional mechanism for faculty authors to assert the retention of at least the minimum rights necessary in order not only to cooperate with their institutional OA policy, but also be able to reuse their work in other ways that could be beneficial to them, such as distributing their work via their own professional website, through social media, or simply to students in their classes.

Resources are available for faculty who are interested in learning more about the impact and implementation of the policy. Please direct questions to iusw@indiana.edu.

Image: CC-BY. Flickr user Open Access Button

Welcome Jamie Wittenberg to the Scholarly Communication department

Jamie Wittenberg headshotWe are delighted to introduce Jamie Wittenberg, who has joined the Scholarly Communication department as the Research Data Management Librarian and assumed the responsibilities of a new position as Head of department. She will provide the department and IU Libraries with vital expertise in planning for long-term preservation of born-digital and digitized scholarship, brokering meaningful access to research outputs, and facilitating the stewardship and reuse of research data. Jamie comes to IU Bloomington from the University of California, Berkeley, where she served as the Service Design Analyst at the Research Data Management Program.

Jamie’s research is focused on building better digital archives and data curation processes through best practices and workflow design. She is currently co-authoring a chapter, “Tools and Approaches to Personal Digital Archiving,” for a forthcoming (2017) ALA Press book entitled The Complete Guide to Personal Digital Archiving for Librarians, Archivists, and Information Professionals, edited by Brianna Marshall. Her recent presentations include a talk at the 2016 DLF Forum on a model for data management pedagogy and curricular design, “Exploiting Expertise: Domain-based Data Services Training for Librarians.”

Jamie received her BA in Literary Studies from Bard College at Simon’s Rock, a Master of British Studies from Humboldt University of Berlin in 2010, and an MSLIS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

This is an exciting time for Scholarly Communication at IU Libraries. Look for updates soon on improved processes for research data preservation and access.

How open science helps researchers succeed

open_science_logo_v2

A new peer-reviewed, sweeping assessment of the impact of open science discovers a number of heartening trends and outcomes in open access approaches to research scholarship. The authors look carefully at the past decade of published research on the impact of open access policies and “find significant benefits to researchers relative to more traditional closed practices.”

 

As they write in summary,

The evidence that openly sharing articles, code, and data is beneficial for researchers is strong and building. Each year, more studies are published showing the open citation advantage; more funders announce policies encouraging, mandating, or specifically financing open research; and more employers are recognizing open practices in academic evaluations. In addition, a growing number of tools are making the process of sharing research outputs easier, faster, and more cost-effective. In his 2012 book Open Access, Peter Suber summed it up best: “[OA] increases a work’s visibility, retrievability, audience, usage, and citations, which all convert to career building. For publishing scholars, it would be a bargain even if it were costly, difficult, and time-consuming. But…it’s not costly, not difficult, and not time-consuming.” (Suber, 2012)

McKiernan et al. “How open science helps researchers succeed.” eLife 2016;5:e16800. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.16800 

The article’s bibliography of past studies is alone worth a look. The full article is available in full text form at elifesciences.org by clicking on the DOI in the article citation above.

Scholarly Communication internship

The IU Libraries Scholarly Communication dept. is looking for an Information and Library Science student to work with us during the Fall semester. This would be an ideal opportunity for someone who wants on-the-job experience using XML (and TEI) encoding for document markup and who is interested in Open Access and scholarly publishing. 

Please contact Richard Higgins (rshiggin@indiana.edu) if you would like to apply or have any questions about the position. The full posting can be seen at the ILS department’s internship placement website: http://www.soic.indiana.edu/career/students/find-job-internship/resources/ils-internship-placements.html#scholarly.

IMH xml-tei

The Scholarly Communication team manages the Libraries’ Open Access publishing program as well as IU’s institutional repository for research and data under the IUScholarWorks brand.

Upcoming Workshop: Maximizing Your Research Impact

An Overview of Scholarly Metrics

The Scholarly Communication Department will be presenting a Scholars’ Commons workshop on maximizing research impact and the range of scholarly metrics now available to researchers.

March 29th 2016 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Hazelbaker Hall (E159)

The workshop will provide an overview and introduction to how traditional and nontraditional scholarly metrics, such as Journal Impact Factor, h-index, ImpactStory, and Altmetrics are being used to gather evidence and demonstrate potential value and research impact during promotion and tenure proceedings. Participants will learn the importance of unique author identifiers including ORCID and Researcher ID, and discuss relevant issues such as choosing a journal for your research, open access, and using scholarly networking tools. Academics from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. Bring a brown bag lunch and join us!

Presented by Erica Hayes & Richard Higgins. Register for the workshop here.

New website and new interim ScholComm librarian

The Scholarly Communication department and the IUScholarWorks staff are pleased to announce that our new, completely redesigned website is live and available to the public. The URL hasn’t changed (scholarworks.iu.edu), but we’ve added new convenient ways to contact us, submit material to IUScholarWorks, and find answers about our services.

We are also pleased to welcome Nicholas Homenda to the department. Nick, who is Digital Initiatives Librarian in the Digital Collections Services Department, will also serve as Interim Scholarly Communications Librarian. Nick is a welcome and familiar contributor to scholarly communication initiatives in the Libraries.

Shayna Pekala, who contributed to some of our most successful digital initiatives as a student and Visiting Scholarly Communication Librarian over the past several years, is heading  to Washington, DC to become the Discovery Librarian at Georgetown University. Shayna was largely responsible for the planning and implementation of our new website, which went live during her very last week with us.

 

Scholarly Communication Consultation Schedule for Spring 2016

This spring staff members from the Scholarly Communication department will once again be holding consultation sessions in the Scholars’ Commons. Naz will hold consultation hours once a week for issues related to copyright and intellectual property. And once per month, Shayna and Richard will be available to answer questions about using the IUScholarWorks institutional repository and the Open Journal System. Our hours for the Spring semester are as follows:

Copyright Information Services
Presented by Naz Pantaloni​
Friday, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm in room 157R

Open Access Publishing
Presented by Shayna Pekala & Richard Higgins
Second Thursday of each month, 2:00 pm – 3:00pm in room 157R
Jan 14, Feb 11, Mar 10, Apr 14

The Scholars Commons is located on the first floor of the East Tower at the Herman B Wells Library. These are drop-in hours, so no appointment is necessary.