Social media metrics for IUScholarWorks content now available

An example altmetric.com report for content hosted on IUScholarWorks
An example report of altmetrics related to Jason Baird Jackson’s “Anthropology of/in Circulation: The Future of Open Access and Scholarly Societies,” uploaded to IUScholarWorks

For those who want to track metrics for the broader impact of the scholarship they’ve uploaded to the IUScholarWorks repository, we are pleased to announce that altmetrics badges and reports (powered by Altmetric.com) are now available, in addition to usage statistics.

Altmetrics are  social media metrics related to any scholarly output–a journal article, a data set, a working paper, or even a slide deck presented at a conference. The Altmetric.com service currently reports altmetrics for any scholarly content that has a DOI, Handle, PubMed ID, or ArXiv ID.

How it works

On any item record in our repository to which an Altmetric.com badge has been added, you’ll see the badge appear in the bottom of the left-hand navigation bar, under the “Statistics” section. (See an example here.) Hovering over the badge with your cursor, you can see an abbreviated report of the social media attention that item has received, including tweets, scholarly blog posts, and social bookmarks on services like Mendeley. By clicking on the badge, you’ll be taken to a full report on Altmetric.com, which offers a drill-down view into your social media metrics and demographics of those who have tweeted about your work.

If you already have content on IUScholarWorks to which you want to add a badge, email your collection administrator or the IUScholarWorks team. For new content, you’ll be given the option to add a badge during the deposit process; pay careful attention when filling out information during your next deposit.

Badges are publicly displayed. There is not yet ‘depositor-only’ access to the altmetrics for your repository content. Depositors wishing to privately view altmetrics for their research on IUScholarWorks repository can subscribe to Altmetric.com’s paid service or sign up for a free ImpactStory account. (Full disclosure: I am a recent hire of ImpactStory.)

Not interested in altmetrics? That’s fine, too. Badges are by default hidden on all existing and new deposits. The service is opt-in by design.

Why we have implemented this service

In talking with regular users of our service, we’ve learned that faculty and graduate students are keen to track how their scholarship is being consumed and shared, within the Academy and beyond. This service will allow interested users to do so.

We believe that an altmetrics reporting service will help scholars to better understand the nuances of what it means to be “impactful” in an an increasingly networked research environment. Our service surfaces a greater variety of impact measures, and can help scholars understand and connect with new audiences.

On a final note, it is also important to bear in mind that relevant quantitative measures of impact differ from discipline to discipline, and that altmetrics as currently conceived (and reported by Altmetric.com) may not meet the needs of historians as well as they do for biologists. As the field matures, we expect to support and experiment with emerging services in our repository.

To learn more about Altmetric.com, visit their website. More information about our implementation of altmetrics and usage statistics in the IUScholarWorks repository can be found on our website.

Hindsight: Journal of Optometry History makes its back issues Open Access

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric C. Tretter/Released)
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric C. Tretter/Released)

Hindsight: Journal of Optometry History, edited by Indiana University professor David Goss and published by the Optometric Historical Society, has released its back issues (1970-2010) with help from the IU Libraries Scholarly Communication department and the IU Libraries Digitization Lab. With the release, Hindsight becomes the longest continuous running journal with the largest amount of backfiles available in the IU open access publishing system.

The journal will continue to release “new” material (with a 2 year embargo). Bookmark the journal’s new website or “subscribe” to the journal’s mailing list to be updated when new content is added.

17 More Essential Altmetrics Resources (the Library Version)

As promised, I have compiled some “required reading” related specifically to altmetrics and their use in libraries. These articles and blog posts actually comprise a majority of the writing out there on altmetrics in libraries–there’s surprisingly little that librarians have written to date on how our profession might use altmetrics to enhance our work.

Ironically enough (given librarians’ own OA advocacy), some of the articles linked below have been published in toll access library science journals. Apologies in advance for any paywalls you may encounter. (Though if you do find barriers to access, you should tell OA Button about it!)

General

Collection Development

Research Data Curation

  • Weber, N. M., Thomer, A. K., Mayernik, M. S., Dattore, B., Ji, Z., & Worley, S. (2013). The Product and System Specificities of Measuring Curation Impact. International Journal of Digital Curation, 8(2).  doi:10.2218/ijdc.v8i2.286

Institutional Repositories

  • Day, M., & Michael Day. (2004). Institutional repositories and research assessment. Project Report. UKOLN, University of Bath. (pp. 1–30). Bath: University of Bath. Retrieved from http://opus.bath.ac.uk/23308/
  • Frank Scholz, S. D. (2006). International Workshop on Institutional Repositories and Enhanced and Alternative Metrics of Publication Impact. CERN. Retrieved from http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/series/dini-schriften/2006-8/PDF/8.pdf
  • Konkiel, S., & Scherer, D. (2013). New opportunities for repositories in the age of altmetrics. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 39(4), 22–26. doi:10.1002/bult.2013.1720390408
  • Merceur, F., Gall, M. Le, Salaün, A., & Le Gall, M. (2011). Bibliometrics: a new feature for institutional repositories. In 14th Biennal EURASLIC Meeting (pp. 1–21). Lyon. Retrieved from http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00031/14253/11886.pdf
  • Organ, M. K. (2006). Download Statistics – What Do They Tell Us? The Example of Research Online, the Open Access Institutional Repository at the University of Wollongong, Australia. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved February 13, 2012, from http://ro.uow.edu.au/asdpapers/44/

Do you have “must read” articles relating to libraries and altmetrics that didn’t make it on this list? Leave ’em in the comments below!

Want to read some general altmetrics-related research? Check out the original list of 17 Essential Altmetrics Resources.

October 25th data visualization & management workshop for beginners

Gephi screenshot
Gephi screenshot from https://gephi.org/

Oct 25 2013
9:00am to 12:00pm
Wells Library Information Commons Instruction Cluster 1

Interested in using data visualization to enhance your research but don’t know where to begin? Learn how to use basic data visualization techniques and tools including Voyant, OpenRefine, Gephi, and Sci2 at our workshop, where we’ll give users the chance to test their skills using data from a variety of open data sources. Experts will also cover the best ways to manage your data throughout its lifecycle. No data visualization experience needed, but attendees should have a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel.

Register here: http://libprod.lib.indiana.edu/tools/workshops/workshop-listings/series-view/182/series

This workshop is part of Open Access Week 2013.

 

17 Essential Altmetrics Resources

As the journal impact factor continues to be challenged by academics, many wonder what measures can take its place if it is indeed eradicated. Surely, we will have to continue to provide objective metrics that measure both the productivity and impact of scholars across the disciplines, won’t we? Some have posited that altmetrics (article-level metrics that measure impact across the social web) may be a good replacement for the impact factor; others contend that altmetrics can serve only as a supplement to existing, more traditional measures of research quality.

I have been asked several times by other librarians to compile a recommended reading list for those who wish to learn more about altmetrics. What I’ve created here is by no means comprehensive; instead, it is intended to be a starting point for further investigation into the field. By including several articles about the impact factor, as well as critiques of the use of research metrics and altmetrics to measure scholarship’s quality, I hope to provide a contextualized view into the field. I also include links to three web services (Altmetric.com, ImpactStory, and PLOS Article Level Metrics) that can be used to track altmetrics.

I’ll soon release a reading list scoped specifically for altmetrics used in the context of academic libraries. Stay tuned!

White House OTSP creates Open Access policy for federal agencies

OTSP Director John Holdren talks to President Obama in this undated White House photo.

One day after we posted big news about dual Open Access bills in the US and Illinois Senates, the Office of Technology and Science Policy issued a policy memorandum that will essentially enact an Open Access policy similar to the NIH Public Access policy for all federal agencies with more than $100 million in their R&D budget. This policy will not only affect publications, but also the data resulting from funded research.

Many in the Open Access advocacy community are celebrating the announcement as proof of the success of the #OAMonday/Access2Research movement and the resulting “We the People” petition, which solicited a positive (if long-overdue) response from Holdren.

Researcher Joe Hourcle, on the RDAP listserv, has distilled the policy into these essential points:

  • Must give a plan in 6 months on how they’re going to improve public access to publications & data
  • Can have an embargo after publication (baseline is 12 months)
  • No charges for access to the article metadata
  • Grants can include costs for data management & access

The Dryad repository blog explores in a bit more detail exactly what this might mean for data sharing and publication.

It remains to be seen how this surprising and groundbreaking new policy will take effect.

Two new Open Access bills generating buzz

A bill not unlike the NIH Public Access policy has been introduced in the United States Congress, laying a framework for increased access to science and technology research conducted with publicly-funded support.

From Library Journal:

The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR) was introduced on February 14 in both the Senate and the House of Representatives. If passed, FASTR would require government agencies with annual extramural research expenditures of more than $100 million make electronic manuscripts of peer-reviewed journal articles based on their research freely available on the Internet within six months of publication in a peer-reviewed journal.

Major library advocacy organizations such as the ALA, ACRL, and SPARC (among others) have come out in support of the FASTR Act.

Commercial publishers’ response to the bill has, predictably, been cold. The American Association of Publishers (AAP) is arguing that the policy would be wasteful of taxpayers money, and that it would not serve the need of all scientific disciplines.

A day later, a more general bill that would mandate the creation of Open Access policies at public universities in Illinois was introduced to the Illinois State Legislature. Possible positive outcomes of this bill include:

  • Free online access to all research published at public universities and colleges in Illinois
  • Increased support for Open Access institutional repositories, which will inevitably become the infrastructure that supports the sharing and preservation of research created in Illinois
  • More awareness of, and support for, digital preservation at the university level

Areas for concern include:

  • The granting of “worldwide copyright license granted by the author to the public.” This provision will likely have faculty up in arms, as the bill calls for what is essentially a CC-BY license to be applied to all work produced by faculty–allowing others to use and share their work in nearly any way they see fit, even for commercial gain.
  • Blanket applicability to all disciplines even though there is more resistance to OA from arts and humanities scholars, who do not benefit from the practice in the same way that science researchers do.

Hopefully, at the very least these bills will both engender some much-needed debate in Congress about the mission of universities as creators of knowledge for the public good rather than profit.

A Guide to Text and Data Mining at Indiana University Bloomington

Kim D, Yu H (2011) Figure Text Extraction in Biomedical Literature. PLoS ONE 6(1): e15338. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0015338
Kim D, Yu H (2011) Figure Text Extraction in Biomedical Literature. PLoS ONE 6(1): e15338. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0015338

Text and data mining of academic databases are becoming increasingly popular ways to conduct research. They can allow scholars to make connections not previously discovered, or find solutions more quickly and efficiently. Such research has also gotten some researchers into trouble for alleged copyright and contract violations, when practiced without due diligence into existing legal restrictions.

For IU researchers interested in accessing the Libraries’ digital journals, databases, special collections (specifically, HathiTrust), and other subscription content for the purposes of text or data mining, we’ve put together a quick-and-dirty guide to text and data mining at IUB. Check it out and let us know what you think in the comments.

Highlights from Open Access Week 2012 at IUB

This year’s Open Access Week events at Indiana University-Bloomington were a resounding success. Due in large part to new cross-campus partnerships, the Scholarly Communication department was able to bring a series of six events to students and faculty from October 22-26.

Naz answers a question about how copyright law affects Open Access at Monday’s event

Librarians Jen Laherty and Nazareth Pantaloni kicked off the week on Monday with their talk “Making Your Work Open Access,” which focused on IU-specific resources for those new to OA publishing. Dr. Urs Schoepflin of Max Planck Gesellschaft fuer Wissenschaftsgeschichte (Berlin) gave a talk on Monday afternoon titled “Challenges for the Humanities: Scholarly Work and Publishing in the Digital Age.” The event, sponsored by Sawyer Seminar (Mellon Foundation), Catapult Center for Digital Humanities, and HPSC brought together faculty and librarians from across the campus for a great discussion on experiences in supporting Open Access digital humanities projects.

On Tuesday, Business/SPEA and Law School graduate students attended a lecture (co-sponsored by GPSO) led by Christina Sheley, Cindy Dabney, and Stacy Konkiel on how to use the popular subject repository, Social Science Research Network.

Will Cowan (Digital Library Program) explains the Oufinopo Database of public domain film noir clips at Wednesday’s event

Science was also on the mind of those who attended Wednesday’s DLP brown bag, “Open Data Visualizations for the Sciences and Humanities,” featuring researchers from across the campus that use visualizations based on open data to power their work. The event, which was the first brown bag held at the new IQ Wall in the Wells Library East Tower, was the week’s best attended.

Thursday’s grad student-focused brown bag, “Real Experiences with Open Access,” featured Dean David W. Lewis (IUPUI), who described the OA publishing landscape via video conference to audiences at

Graduate students listen to Dean David W. Lewis’s lecture on Open Access at Thursday’s brown bag event

IU Bloomington and IUPUI. The event, co-organized by IUB SLIS students Laura Manifold and Margaret Janz and librarian Kristi Palmer at IUPUI, and co-sponsored by the GPSO, was the most popular graduate student event of the week. Asked why she chose to participate in Open Access Week, Manifold explained, “I really believe Open Access is an integral part of the library’s future.  As an MLIS graduate student, it’s important to me to get my peers involved in what will be the norm for scholarship and research.” Janz agreed, adding: “Open Access is a great -and necessary- shift in scholarly communication, not just for graduate students, but for all scholars and researchers. It’s goes beyond issues of library budgets; open sharing of information is essential for advancing research on a global scale.”

Friday saw the final event for Open Access Week at IU Bloomington, “Complying with the NIH Public Access Mandate.” The workshop helped attendees understand the OA-friendly federal mandate, and showcased the tools used to make NIH-sponsored research freely available to the public.

The IU Libraries and the new Office of Scholarly Publishing rounded out the week by releasing a statement explaining their support for Open Access. The statement, available here on the Scholarly Communication Department’s blog, sums up the reasons why facilitating Open Access publishing is a priority for the Libraries.

The Scholarly Communication Department would like to thank the GPSO for their co-sponsorship of our events. We would also like to thank our workshop leaders, participants, and SLIS students Laura Manifold and Margaret Janz.

IU Libraries and Open Access

Dr. Katy Börner explains a visualization built on open Wikipedia data at the IU Libraries' Open Data Visualizations for the Sciences and Humanities brown bag on October 24, 2012.
Dr. Katy Börner explains a visualization built on open Wikipedia data at the IU Libraries’ Open Data Visualizations for the Sciences and Humanities brown bag on October 24, 2012.

The week of October 22-28 was designated as the sixth annual Open Access Week, during which members of the academic and research community across the globe hosted events to recognize and promote the value of open access publication. For IU Libraries, Open Access Week was an opportunity to introduce researchers and students to our many open access tools and experts, answer questions about these services and technologies, and help scholars discover new ways to engage with and benefit from open access publishing.

Facilitating open access publication is a priority for Indiana University Libraries. The IU Libraries exist to support all aspects of scholarship at IU – from providing materials, tools, and services for research to promoting innovation in teaching and learning. Increasingly, we are also called upon to develop and implement diverse channels for scholarly communications. While traditional publication methods remain essential to many disciplines, these new, highly accessible models offer scholars unprecedented opportunities for sharing their findings and engaging in real-time global discussions that can dramatically enhance their work.

Open access literature, as defined by Peter Suber of the Harvard Open Access Project, is “digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.” This type of publication can broaden the availability of research findings, forging greater connections among scholars and learners and increasing the pace at which discoveries can build upon one another. These capabilities call to mind the principles outlined in the Intellectual Freedom Manual of the American Library Association:

“Intellectual freedom can exist only where two essential conditions are met: first, that all individuals have the right to hold any belief on any subject and to convey their ideas in any form they deem appropriate, and second, that society makes an equal commitment to the right of unrestricted access to information and ideas regardless of the communication medium used, the content of work, and the viewpoints of both the author and the receiver of information.”  (Intellectual Freedom Manual. Introduction. 8th edition, 2010, p. xvii.)

Our continual goals are to uphold these principles of intellectual freedom, respond to the information resource needs of the communities we serve, and preserve information for future generations. To meet these objectives, we have developed a suite of library-based open access publishing services for Indiana University. Gathered under the heading of IUScholarWorks, these services enable researchers to preserve and share their work in a persistent online repository, store and archive their data in searchable formats, and even publish and manage new online journals that remain freely available worldwide.

For an increasing number of IU scholars, these and other open access tools represent a new frontier for scholarly communication. By removing restrictions in research availability and hastening the publication process, open access models capitalize on new technologies to create a thriving global network of interconnected scholars who can quickly respond to advancements within and beyond their fields.