Museum Anthropology Review: A New Era & A New Double Issue

The Scholarly Communication Department is pleased to announce a new double issue of Museum Anthropology Review (MAR) published for the first time by Indiana University Press.  MAR is an open access, research and professional practice journal promoting international and interdisciplinary communication within the fields of museum anthropology, museum-based folklore studies, and material culture studies. 

MAR homepage logo

The opening editorial details MAR’s office transition from the newly incorporated Indiana University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology (IUMAA, previously Mathers Museum of World Cultures) to IU’s Department of Folklore and Ethnomusicology.  There, it will be a part of the Material Culture and Heritage Studies Laboratory.  These editorial and publication transitions present exciting opportunities for the journal, including a new professional design, assured continuity, and the ability to recruit editors worldwide.  The editorial also reminds readers that MAR is actively seeking submissions for future volumes, with an emphasis on project reports and full articles. Information on preparing submissions is available on the MAR website.

In The Greater Cleveland Ethnographic Museum: The Life and Afterlife of a Public Folklore Organization, Timothy Lloyd describes the unique history and preserved archives of an organization that has been gone for almost 40 years, the Greater Cleveland Ethnographic Museum (GCEM).  The museum was brought about by the recognized importance of documenting the cultural heritage of Cleveland’s numerous nationality communities as well as local and national funding.  During its five-year existence, the museum was able to develop several documentary projects describing the immigrant experience as well as traditional music and dance.  Crucially, GCEM was able to foster a relationship early on with the Western Reserve Historical Society, a local, larger cultural institution that maintains the majority of GCEM’s documentary and administrative data today, though the museum closed in 1981.  Lloyd extends a healthy reminder that “Waiting until the eleventh hour to plan and act for sustainability, though it certainly is a standard strategy, is most often not enough” (p. 16).

Jessica Evans Jain documents her fieldwork with market henna artists across North India in her monograph-length study Mehandi in the Marketplace: Tradition, Training, and Innovation in the Henna Artistry of Contemporary Jaipur, India.  Though the application of henna has long been a culturally significant tradition for women in this region, the convenience of henna stands in marketplaces is a relatively new phenomenon.

Two male artists apply henna to a young girl in a marketplace.

Jain completes in-depth interviews with these stand workers, experiences their perspective first-hand during her apprenticeships, and analyzes their work through the lens of Albert Lord’s theory of spontaneous creation.  While the market artists often downplay their work or do not consider themselves to be artists, the author couldn’t help but notice the creativity and innovation involved as she became more familiar with the henna application process.  Though this henna application has innovated in recent years,  it is still an important cultural act and promotes a happier and more positive atmosphere in North Indian communities.

In Repair Work Ethnographies: Revisiting Breakdown, Relocating Materiality (Strebel, Bovet, and Sormani, eds), Kristin Otto reviews the book by the same title, edited by Ignaz Strebel, Alain Bovet and Philippe Sormani.  The book centralizes studies of repair as an important link between people, things, and their environment through discussing its place in conversations about networks, assemblages, and politics.  Otto regards the work relevant and applicable to a large number of fields including scholars of science and technology studies, anthropology, material culture studies, and sociology.  

In 2008, the Museum Anthropology Review became the first faculty-generated, open-access electronic journal to be supported by IU Libraries.  With MAR as part of a pilot test, the Scholarly Communication Department has since been able to offer a journal publishing platform for IU affiliates as a part of IUScholarWorks services.  The Scholarly Communication Department is excited to to continue with MAR in its expanded partnership with IU Press.  

For more information on open access journals or another IUScholarWorks service please visit the website or contact us at IUSW@indiana.edu

Office of Scholarly Publishing in the News

This summer, the Office of Scholarly Publishing has been reflecting on the services we provide and the value we bring to IU’s campus and open access scholarly publishing broadly. Simultaneously, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) has been mentioned in several recent articles and news pieces on open access publishing and author rights. I believe that these pieces start to answer our questions about the value, perspective, and expertise that we contribute to the larger community.

Jason Jackson’s post, which discusses Museum Anthropology Review’s business and labor model, highlights the instrumental role library publishers play in the open access ecosystem. Jason states,

I am not able to quantify the financial investments that the IU Libraries have made in MAR via the IUSW program, but the investment is significant and important…. just as MAR tries to serve the field without charging fees for that service, IUSW tries to serve projects like MAR without charging fees for that service. It is certainly the case that economies of scale have been realized by having library-based publishing support services that can concurrently help a wide range of (mostly small) journal projects.

Another recent piece, “What Happened, or, Impasses and Future Horizons for an Open Anthropology of Work” grapples with the challenges of operationalizing open access in the field of anthropology. The editorial cites conversations with the Office of Scholarly Publishing to make an important anthropology title, Anthropology Work Review, open access. While the effort was not successful and we do not currently publish AWR, the piece is important for demonstrating the values that IU’s OSP is dedicated to. Conversations with AWR were also a reflective exercise for our team, as they forced us to reflect on and operationalize our values, which in turn led to a better understanding of our own mission and ethics.

Finally, a recent op ed (first presented as a keynote) discusses the 50th anniversary of the Liberian Studies Association and mentions the association’s journal, the Liberian Studies Journal. The OSP currently hosts the journal’s back issues and is in conversations to help the publication renew publication efforts.

When I think about what OSP is and what we aim to be, I envision a meaningful partnership between IU Press and IU Libraries Scholarly Communication staff that encourages cross-pollination, harnesses disparate publishing resources, and pools expertise strategically in order to transform scholarly publishing at IU by:

  1. Serving IU faculty and students, through journal publishing, open access book publishing, and course material publishing.
  2. Moving conversations on publishing innovations forward on campus and in the larger community. This includes, but isn’t limited to, conversations around experimental peer review, course material affordability, hybrid OA models, open source infrastructure, and new modes of scholarship, including 3D object and multi-media integration.  
  3. Educating the next generation of scholars, both through supporting the creation of student publishing projects and creating programming and hands-on experiences for students interested in publishing, open access, and scholarly career paths.
  4. Moving the national conversation on library publishing, library/press partnerships, and open access forward.

I’m excited to see that we are already making a significant impact in several of these areas, including number four. The pieces above demonstrate that we are both inspiring and contributing to important national conversations that will impact the future of open access publishing.

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Portrayal of Scientists in Children’s Books

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department student assistant Regine Vincent.

Through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and the Indiana University Press, readers everywhere have access to 30+ scholarly  journals and scholarly publications free of charge. One of these journals is The Hoosier Science Teacher.

The Hoosier Science Teacher aims to “provide science educators in Pre-K-12 classrooms, informal education, home schools, and college classrooms with ideas and resources for teaching science…[and publish] content that may help support effective teaching of science and professional development for science educators.” First published in 1975 by The Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc. (HASTI), The Hoosier Science Teacher published regularly in print until 2014. In 2017, publication of the Teacher resumed electronically.  All of the journal’s content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s Managing Editor, Matthew J. Benus, is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the IU Northwest School of Education and a Think Tank & Strategic Consultant for Science & Learning.

Published biannually, the most recent volume of the journal Volume 40 Issue 1 (2018) contains 7 articles covering a variety of topics from lessons and demonstrations and instructional insight to curriculum and learning environments. One of the articles in the current issue is entitled “How Scientists are Portrayed in NSTA Recommends Books” and is authored by Kevin D. Finson and Cecile Arquette of Bradley University and Donna Farland-Smith of The Ohio State University. Finson, Arquette, and Smith argue that while “there was much consistency in how scientists were portrayed in the books across the three years…there were also issues with appropriate numbers of representations of minorities, women, and age of scientists.”

The authors focus on how depictions of scientists in school books affect children’s “perceptions of scientists,” as such perceptions impact students’ “understanding about where scientists work and what they do,” students’ attitudes towards science, as well as students’ success in science learning. While determining exactly how students develop their view of scientists is not easy, they find that media sources have the largest influence or impact. Stereotypes of scientists as older, white males in children’s literature has implications for children that do not identify with these portrayals. Such portrayals can affect students’ “formation of science identity,” which affects “one’s perception that he/she can be a successful investigator in science contexts and is viewed by others as being competent in science.”

Seeing as depictions of scientists in school books have major impacts on students’ interactions with and views of the field of science, tackling the issue of stereotypical depictions is a must. The authors suggest that one way to address this issue is through  “the use of science trade books and picture books in instruction…[teacher-planned] student-centered activities that give [students] opportunities to explore their world and encourage them to think of themselves as scientists.”

The Hoosier Science Teacher’s commitment to open access and immediate availability makes it an immediately accessible and useful resource for teachers. According to Education Week Teacher, educators around the United States spend more than $1 billion dollars a year out-of-pocket on school supplies and resources for their students. This is particularly troubling for schools serving lower-income neighborhoods where, according to NPR, “teachers in high-poverty schools often find themselves digging even deeper into their own pockets.” Access to publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher may help educators to alleviate some of the out-of-pocket costs that they encounter when trying to access needed resources and literature on experimental approaches for their students and their teaching. 

The IU Libraries is committed to diverse collections and perspectives, as the Libraries Diversity Strategic Plan notes that “diversity is… essential to the intellectual vitality of the university.” The Scholarly Communication department shares this commitment and aims to highlight IU’s diversity through our journal publishing program and through supporting publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher.

What’s the Scholarly Communication Department Working On?

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Graduate Student Jenny Hoops.

This week, the Scholarly Communication Department has been hard at work preparing for the upgrade to our new publishing platform, Open Journals Systems 3 (OJS 3). Our priorities have included providing outreach for our journal editors and managers, integrating IU branding and accessibility information, and creating a consistent design for the overall website while allowing each journal to maintain a unique aesthetic.

The department offered three training sessions for journal managers and editors over the course of last week. These sessions highlighted the differences between the OJS 2 and OJS 3, emphasizing the streamlined process of submission management and the various technological improvements.

Image 1: Screenshot of the design and navigation improvements in OJS 3

Attendees were also able to see OJS 3 in action for the first time, as the training included a demo of the editorial workflow and a general overview of settings and features. While one of these workshops was available via Zoom in order to access editors not able to travel to IU, the two in-person sessions will include a series of hands-on activities in a test space of OJS 3.

Image 2: Photo of Sarah Hare teaching an OJS training session

For those editorial teams unable to attend one of the training sessions, the following resources will be of interest:

Image 3: Timeline of OJS 3 launch

On April 5, we will be enacting a freeze on all of our journal content in order to facilitate final implementation of OJS 3. Users will be unable to submit new articles, engage in any editorial activity, or publish any issues during these four days, but articles will still be accessible for the general public. By April 9, OJS 3 will go live, and full functionality of both journal websites and the editorial workflow will be reinstated. If you have any questions about this timeline, training sessions, or OJS 3 generally, contact iusw@indiana.edu.

Open Education Week 2018 at IU: A Recap

On Thursday March 8, the Office of Scholarly Publishing and UITS partnered to hold a day-long Driving Student Success through Affordable Course Material Symposium. The symposium featured three experts from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Each expert brought a unique  perspective and context to the conversation. Steel Wagstaff (Educational Technology Consultant), Kris Olds (Professor of Geography), and Carrie Nelson (Librarian and Director of Scholarly Communication) presented at morning workshops and participated in an afternoon panel.

Both faculty and staff attended with the symposium, with representatives from the Kelley School of Business, the School of Education, UITS, the Office of Financial Literacy, and the Office of the Vice President for Diversity, Equity, and Multicultural Affairs present. By the end of the day, at least one faculty member had switched from traditional course content to an affordable, digital eText! We’ve also already met with one faculty member interested in student-created OER and plan to have several follow up conversations in the coming months.

Participants chose one of two morning workshops: “Making Open Textbooks and Other Interactive Learning Activities with Pressbooks” with Steel Wagstaff or “Supporting Campus and Course-Level Adoption of Open Course Content” with Carrie Nelson and Kris Olds. These workshops were informative and informal, shaped by participants’ questions and centered on hands on application.

In Kris and Carrie’s session, we discussed the basics of open/ affordable and covered Creative Commons licensing, which then allowed us to have a more in-depth conversation about the process/ funding needed to create OER, governance and course material selection, student outreach, and the political economy of OER. Kris and Carrie also shared successful strategies for raising awareness about OER on their campus, which several participants felt was the most pressing barrier to more systematic adoption.

Robert McDonald, Associate Dean for Research and Technology Strategies, kicked off the afternoon panel with contextual information about the price of course materials at IUB and how these costs impact students. The panel then opened with an overview of current initiatives at IU Bloomington, presented by Michele Kelmer and Michael Regoli. The panel transitioned to  presentations from our UW-Madison guest experts. Each of the guest’s presentations demonstrated that UW-Madison is engaging in innovative work around Open Educational Resource (OER) creation and community building.

I was inspired by several parts of the panel, but there are two slides I’d like to highlight here as essential and foundational for shaping the Office of Scholarly Publishing’s outreach at IU Bloomington.

  • Steel’s guiding principles for his work:
    • Go anywhere
    • Talk to everyone
    • Say ‘yes… you can’
    • Find partners, champions, and enthusiasts
    • Build local capacity
  • Carrie’s argument that OER and affordable course material content work aligns with library values around:
    • Access
    • Confidentiality/Privacy
    • Democracy
    • Diversity
    • Education and Lifelong Learning
    • Intellectual Freedom
    • The Public Good
    • Preservation
    • Professionalism
    • Service
    • Social Responsibility

These points were both encouraging and motivating to me. The Scholarly Communication Department is invested in instructor agency and autonomy, student access, and building local expertise here at IUB. We hope to continue to find champions and enthusiasts that can partner with us to make these goals possible.

There were several goals for symposium: to build community around course material issues, to connect instructors and relevant staff from key offices on campus, to raise awareness about the spectrum of existing affordable course material work happening at IU Bloomington, and to guide the future of Office of Scholarly Publishing services. We know the conversation doesn’t end here! We look forward to continuing to work with instructors on affordable and open course material creation and adoption. We also hope to partner with librarians and instructors within the IU system, Big Ten Academic Alliance (BTAA), and Unizin.

Resources

OSP and IU Open Journals: FAQ

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department Graduate Student Jenny Hoops. 

Founded in 2012 by Indiana University Provost Lauren Robel, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) is a collaboration between IU Press and the scholarly publishing activities at IU Libraries aimed at furthering the enterprise of scholarly publishing at IU and beyond. Within the OSP, IU Press members provide invaluable expertise in journal production, copyediting, and marketing, alongside IU Libraries representatives, who provide consultation on intellectual property matters, digital preservation of scholarly research, public outreach for publishing initiatives across campus, and encourage the utilization of open access publishing models. The Office of Scholarly Publishing serves as an essential venue for the publishing activities of faculty, students, and staff of Indiana University.

With the current migration to the latest Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3 update—the online journals hosting platform for IUScholarWorks and IU Press journals—we continue to receive questions about the Office of Scholarly Publishing and the services it provides. We hope to clarify these below, as well as offer information to those who are interested in the suite of  publishing services available to OSP journals and partners.  

What kind of content does the Office of Scholarly Publishing handle?

The Office of Scholarly Publishing primarily deals with open access journal content, but OSP representatives are available to consult with IU faculty and staff about the publication of other kinds of scholarly materials. Last fall, the OSP helped Kelley School of Business instructors create four different eTexts for their courses using the PressBooks platform, for example. Anyone affiliated with IU that is interested in open access publishing is encouraged to contact the OSP to discuss their project in more detail.

What is the difference between IU Open Journals and Office of Scholarly Publishing journals?

Both IU Open Journals and OSP journals utilize Open Journal Systems, an online journal publishing platform developed by the Public Knowledge Project. The IU Open Journals program offers a digital publishing platform for any editorial team associated with Indiana University. There are minimal restrictions to becoming an IU Open Journal as only an affiliation with IU and a regular publication schedule are necessary. Peer review is not required, and pieces of work not often found in academic journals—such as memos or experimental art/poetry—can find a place of publication with this program. Our IU Open Journal service is an excellent place for any serial publication, including more non-traditional forms of scholarship, to receive support and hosting in order to make publication possible.

In contrast, Office of Scholarly Publishing journals are a select set of journals that are more academically rigorous, usually exclusively faculty peer-reviewed and faculty-authored publications.  The OSP will assess journal candidates to determine if a new journal is a potential OSP journal. If it is, it will be supported by the OSP while IU Open Journals will receive support from IUScholarWorks and the Scholarly Communication Department at IU Libraries.

What services does the Office of Scholarly Publishing offer?

The Office of Scholarly Publishing offers assistance with new journal setup, editorial team education for journal workflow and website management, technical support with Open Journal Systems (OJS) software, increased user access and discoverability thorough indexing and metrics, and digital preservation of online content. OSP brokers copyediting, typesetting,  and on-demand printing services and its staff are able to consult with editorial teams on marketing and design needs.

I’m in interested in starting a new publication with Indiana University. How do I start this process?

Contact iusw@indiana.edu to start set-up for a potential new journal. We will work with you to figure out whether or not your publication should be supported by IU Open Journals or the Office of Scholarly Publishing, and then provide you with outreach and technical support for Open Journal Systems.

The Importance of Undergraduate Student Research at IU

This semester I had the privilege of teaching “Academic Editing and Publishing,” a one-credit hour course for the Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research (IUJUR) student editorial board. I co-taught the course with a current undergraduate student and the former editor-in-chief of IUJUR, Sonali Mali. The purpose of the course was twofold: to give students a practical skillset for publishing a multidisciplinary undergraduate scholarly journal at Indiana University while also informing students of larger conceptual academic publishing issues.

Striking a balance between practical fundamentals—for example, learning the ins and outs of our publishing platform and evaluating submissions using IUJUR-specific rubrics—with larger concepts was sometimes challenging. Overall, I think that students appreciated the authentic learning experiences that resulted from using an active journal as a tangible example throughout the course.

I learned a lot about myself as an instructor and the importance of librarian perspectives in undergraduate publishing education. Library publishers are experts in ethical publishing practices, open access funding, and various peer review models. Students were most passionate when we discussed the cost of information, open access publishing, and new publishing innovations, including post-publication peer review, data publishing, and including 3D and media in traditional journal publishing. I was excited to talk about these developments in the context of the work that IU Libraries is pursuing and several of the case studies we discussed in class were pulled from work that the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) and IU Press is currently engaged in. 

The Importance of Undergraduate Research

Throughout the course, I learned about the importance of undergraduate research and the integral role that IUJUR editors play as ambassadors for undergraduate research at Indiana University. I kicked off the first session of our course with asking students to articulate why undergraduate research was important. Students shared that IUJUR gave IU students a voice and presence on a research-intensive campus. They explained that an institutional commitment to undergraduate research provided space for all students to ask their own research questions and share their perspectives. They also noted that IUJUR gives student editors and authors access to faculty advisors, tangible career preparation, and opportunities to refine their voice and collaboration skills. Here were a few of my favorite responses from this activity:
undergrad research primes a generation of future researchers

prepares students for grad school and beyond

gives students the ability to take a proactive role in shaping the research climate on campus

These responses align with the growing body of literature that discusses how impactful and effective undergraduate research is. The Council on Undergraduate Research supports institutions of all sizes and missions that provide some kind of undergraduate research opportunity for faculty and students to collaborate on. They have a variety of publications, many of which are freely available to access. Some of the benefits of intensive undergraduate research that CUR has identified include:

Enhances student learning through mentoring relationships with faculty

Increases retention

Increases enrollment in graduate education and provides effective career preparation

Develops critical thinking, creativity, problem solving and intellectual independence

Develops an understanding of research methodology

Promotes an innovation-oriented culture

Similarly, undergraduate research has been called a “high-impact practice” or HIP. George Kuh wrote a landmark paper for the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AACU) on high-impact educational practices in 2008. When researching why intensive undergraduate research, service learning, learning communities, and other learning opportunities were particularly effective, he found several similarities between HIPs (pgs. 14-17), including:

An extensive investment from students

Interaction and relationship building between peers and with faculty to solve “substantive” or real-world problems

Exposure to diverse perspectives and viewpoints

Consistent feedback to foster improvement and growth 

Kuh’s list applies to the intensive work that IUJUR authors and editors do to publish a multidisciplinary journal regularly.

Throughout the course I always tried to come back to our first session and the reasons that students identified for why undergraduate research is important. I can now articulate that the product–the final research output that others can read and cite–is only a piece of the puzzle. The process that IUJUR student editors and authors go through is just as fundamental. The process is where learning takes place. It’s where we train future researchers, scholars, and citizens to think critically about access to research and how we evaluate scholarship. It’s where we build relationships with students that transform their future career paths and broaden and enhance their existing interests. I am thankful to play a small part in the IUJUR student editors’ process and be part of a campus that prioritizes undergraduate research.

Additional resources:

Additional reading on undergraduate research journals:

  • Dawson, D. D., & Marken, L. (2017). Undergraduate Research Journals: Benefits and Good Practices of Involving Students in Content Creation and Other Scholarly Communication Activities. WILU 2017 Conference, University of Alberta. https://ecommons.usask.ca/handle/10388/7899
  • Riehle, C. F. (2014). Collaborators in Course Design: A Librarian and Publisher at the Intersection of Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication. In 2014 LOEX Conference Proceedings. http://docs.lib.purdue.edu/lib_fsdocs/119/
  • Weiner, S., & Watkinson, C. (2014). What do students learn from participation in an undergraduate research journal? Results of an assessment. Journal of Librarianship and Scholarly Communication, 2(2). http://doi.org/10.7710/2162-3309.1125

The Office of Scholarly Publishing Welcomes Newest Version of Open Journal Systems

The IU Office of Scholarly Publishing is working on a lot of exciting projects this summer. One of those projects is planning its rollout of Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3. The Public Knowledge Project announced the release of OJS 3 last summer and they have been continually updating and improving the open source journals publishing software since the upgrade. The latest version of OJS offers more robust functionality and several new features, making it a major enhancement to the platform we currently provide to over 30 journals. We hope to migrate all of our journals to OJS 3 by spring 2018.

We believe that the new upgrade will make editors’ work more straightforward and will streamline the editorial processes from article submission through final publication. In addition to offering a more flexible interface for customizing each journal’s homepage, OJS 3 enables editors to easily tailor the editorial workflow to their journal’s specific needs and processes. OJS 3 was developed after extensive usability testing with both authors and editors and, as a result, the new system provides more flexible permissions and less restrictive author registration requirements.

OJS 3 will also include a plugin gallery, with new and updated plugins to improve our assessment of journals and DOI registration process. One of the most exciting plugins that OJS 3 will offer is Open Typesetting Stack (OTS). OTS will enable editors to publish their journals in full-text HTML as well as PDF. The plugin will make each journal’s born-digital content more readily accessible to all readers while enhancing the archiving and preservation of its content. We are excited about this new functionality, as it will enable us to integrate multimedia, 3D objects, and other innovative forms of scholarship into our publications.

We recognize that our editors will need personalized support as they learn to use and customize OJS 3 to fit their editorial needs. We plan to meet with each journal individually before next spring to discuss the migration timeline in depth and provide each editorial team with one-on-one training. We are committed to making sure that all content is migrated correctly and efficiently. In addition, we plan to customize PKP’s extensive documentation to our specific OJS instance and our editors’ needs.

The Public Knowledge Project has created an OJS 3 demonstration journal for your perusal. We encourage you to explore OJS 3 in more depth and send any questions you may have about the migration or the new platform to iusw@indiana.edu. If you aren’t one of our current editors but are still interested in launching or moving a journal to the new OJS platform, please contact us. The Office of Scholarly Publishing is excited to work with editors on this important update.

Studies in Digital Heritage Publishes First Issue

The Scholarly Communication Department is excited to share that the first issue of Studies in Digital Heritage (SDH) has been published. SDH is an innovative, interdisciplinary journal that highlights the role that digital technology plays in furthering cultural heritage research. SDH is a peer-reviewed, open access publication supported by our Office of Scholarly Publishing.

SDH provides a tangible example of how the OSP partnership has come to fruition. In addition to the Press offering SDH copyediting, print-on-demand, and promotion alongside IU Press scholarly journals, the Scholarly Communication Department is publishing SDH in both PDF and HTML. This investment makes the innovative and unique features of SDH possible, particularly the integration of embedded, interactive 3D models.

As co-editor-in-chief Bernie Frischer writes in his welcome to new readers,

SDH is here to serve the needs of the international community of Digital Heritage professionals and to do so with Open Access, no Article Processing Charge (APC), and no sacrifice in standards with respect to style, layout, and scientific substance.

Like Professor Frischer, we believe that access is compatible with rigor and innovation. In addition to the full text of SDH being open, the OSP partnership will increase the discoverability of its articles to readers interested in this area. OSP journals are currently indexed by Serial Solutions to promote and include SDH content in other library catalogs.

Founded in 2012, the Office of Scholarly Publishing is a partnership between the Indiana University Libraries and the IU Press, aimed at utilizing expertise from both communities to provide outstanding publishing services and support. In 2016, the OSP started offering expanded services to select campus journals.

SDH exemplifies the evolution of scholarly communication by supporting open, multi-modal, cross-disciplinary, and collaborative research.

Introducing Office of Scholarly Publishing Journals

Image 1: IUScholarWorks Journals main pageThe way Open Access journals publishing is done on campus is about to become even more rewarding—and exciting. Select OA journals based at Indiana University will have the option of benefitting from enhanced publishing services through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP). The OSP was established by Indiana University Provost Lauren Robel in 2012 as a single-service campus publishing resource that draws upon the expertise and capabilities of IU Libraries and IU Press. Since 2009, the IU Libraries have facilitated the publishing of open access journals with the IUScholarWorks journals service. Among other services, the Libraries have provided technical support, performed platform maintenance and upgrades, and migrated content into the Public Knowledge Project’s Open Journal Systems platform at no charge.

Now, through the Office of Scholarly Publishing, those services can expand, still at no charge, for those campus OA journals whose operations are consistent with professionally-published scholarly journals. Drawing upon IU Press expertise in production, copyediting, indexing, and marketing, the OA journals selected will have the option of receiving an array of expanded publishing services. These include worldwide promotion alongside IU Press scholarly journals; copyediting, design, and layout; indexing; print-on-demand and fulfillment; e-reader editions; and additional revenue through print and online advertising sales. Representatives from IU Libraries and IU Press have begun meeting with journal editors to determine how the expanded services of the Office of Scholarly Publishing would be able to help support their particular areas of need.

This expanded-service journals program is the first phase of the rollout of the Office of Scholarly Publishing’s comprehensive suite of publishing services for the IU community. In the coming months, those services will continue to grow, including the development of new websites from IU Press and the OSP that will contain robust, interactive author interfaces as well as a host of vital information and publishing options for campus authors and editors.

For more information, contact:

Nicholas Homenda, interim Scholarly Communication Librarian

Michael Regoli, Director of Electronic and Journals Publishing, IU Press