A Recap of Open Access Week 2017

This is the tenth year Open Access Week has been celebrated. Each year, we celebrate a different piece of Open Access and its importance. For 2017, the emphasis was on “Open in Order to…” and the tangible benefits that scholars and institutions reap when research is openly available. The Open Access Week site lists several responses for the “Open in Order to…” prompt including “increase access to knowledge,” “facilitate collaboration,” and “raise your research visibility.”

At IU Libraries, we facilitated and promoted several programs that aligned with this year’s emphasis on the tangible results of OA. Staff from the Scholarly Communication Department, Teaching and Learning, Indiana University Press, the Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities (IDAH), and the Mathers Museum of World Cultures created and led these programs.

The “What Does Google Tell the World About You?” session focused on how openness can impact online presence and increase discoverability.  Our workshop entitled “Predatory Publishers, Open Scholarship, and Your Research” provided an overview of predatory publishing practices and strategies for finding a reputable publisher. “How Does Scholarly Peer-Review for Publication Work? An Introduction for Journals and Books” gave participants a practical, behind-the-scenes look at scholarly peer-review for journals as well as books. Additionally, as an extension of OA week, an info-share and group consultation on the new Open Access Digital Monograph Publishing Program will happen this Tuesday, 10/31. The program supports the publication of open-access monographs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences with a $15,000 subvention.

Finally, Indiana University Press made five IU faculty-authored books published freely available on the IUScholarworks platform from October 20 through October 27. The titles included Dealing with Dictators by Lazlo Borhi, Folk Art and Aging by Jon Kay, Abidjan USA by Daniel Reed, The Accompaniment in “Unaccompanied” Bach by Stanley Ritchie, and Guide to the Solo Horn Repertoire by Richard Seraphinoff.

OA week display case with open press books
The Open Access Week Display Case In Wells Lobby, Featuring some of the IU Press books made openly available 10/20-10/27

The “opening up” of these titles coincided with the annual IU Press Authors Event, which celebrates IUB faculty that have published a monograph in the last year. Authors were congratulated by Dean Walters, Provost Robel, and Vice Provost Van Kooten.

books publishing by IU faculty
A selection of the monographs published by IU faculty in the last year

Our focus for Open Access Week 2017 was to highlight the tangible, practical side of Open Access. Open Access increases impact, provides content to all, and is compatible with reputable and rigorous publishing. Our events this year dispelled common OA myths while highlighting these truths and emphasizing OA’s impact on the IU community specifically.

New Open Access Resources for OA Week 2017

Open Access Week 2017 is quickly approaching! This year, OA Week is October 23-27. We will publish more information about the IU Libraries 2017 Open Access Week events in a subsequent post, but I wanted to share all of the new and exciting resources we have created to prepare for OA Week now.

Open Access Week is a time to celebrate collaboratively working toward the shared goal of open and accessible research for all. The most important part of this shared vision is that when all work is open, we can build upon each other’s ideas, discoveries, and innovations. The first step in achieving this vision is simply sharing materials so that others can re-mix and re-use them.

In addition to a new Open Access guide, we’ve created a guide for detecting and avoiding predatory publishers and conferences. Publishers and conferences categorized as “predatory” are uninterested in sharing properly reviewed work or respecting the rights of authors; they are interested solely in profit and often ask authors to pay costly publishing or presenting fees. While some legitimate open access publications charge article processing charges (or APCs), predatory publishers are different. We will use this new guide in our OA week event on predatory publishers, but we hope that it will serve as an information source for graduate students long after the session. The guide walks students through how to evaluate a potential publisher or conference and also dispels some myths about the connection between predatory publishing and open access.

predatory publisher event flier

Flier Created by IU Libraries Advancement

The Scholarly Communication Department has also collaborated with the Reference Department to create an Open Access Week 2017 display in the Wells Library Lobby. The display will run from October 13 until Thanksgiving. The display was inspired by Open Access Week materials created and shared by OpenCon organizer Lorraine Chuen. Because Lorraine shared the posters under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 4.0), we were able to take her design and revise it to include Indiana University branding and information about IU Libraries events.

2017 OA week overview

open access week open in order to have a global impact

Layout by Leanne Nay, Digital Engagement Librarian

Finally, we are excited about our OA week event for undergraduate students, which is centered on how students can share their work openly and refine their online presence in order to secure employment after graduation. This event is the result of a partnership between the IU Libraries Teaching and Learning Department and the Scholarly Communication Department and is being promoted by the IU Career Development Center.

Learn more about Open Access at Indiana University by visiting https://openscholarship.indiana.edu/

scholarly communication department service overview

Layout by Leanne Nay, Digital Engagement Librarian

Open Access Week 2015

It’s that time of year again!  On October 19th-23rd, IU Bloomington will celebrate Open Access Week 2015.  Open Access Week is a great opportunity for students, faculty, and librarians to learn more about the potential benefits of open access scholarship and research.  In lieu of this year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration,” IU Bloomington has put together a great series of workshops with speakers from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research, Indiana University Press, and the IU Libraries.  Topics of discussion will include data management, academic publishing for early-career researchers, journal publishing agreements, and more.  All are encouraged to attend and learn from each other!

See below for a detailed list of workshops to be held during Open Access Week 2015:

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Wells W144 | 3pm-4pm
Open Lab: IUScholarWorks

  • Shayna Pekala and Richard Higgins, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Wells E159 | 3pm-4pm
What You Need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Wells E159 | 12pm-1pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

 Friday, October 23, 2015 | Wells E158 | 11am-1pm
Data Management 101 (Lunch included)

  • Heather Coates, Michelle Dalmau, and Jennifer Laherty, Indiana University Libraries
  • Tassie Gniady and Sofia McDowell, Office of Research Compliance
  • Kristy Kallback-Rose, UITS Research Technologies
  • Jennifer Guiliano, Department of History, IUPUI
  • Kalani Craig, Department of History, IUB

OA Week 2014 Wrap-Up

On October 20-24th, IU Bloomington celebrated Open Access Week 2014 with a series of workshops and events to increase the local research community’s understanding of open access. Moira Marsh and Dee Mortensen kicked off the week with a session on the “Road to Publishing for Students,” where they relayed the steps in the publishing process and shared tips on how to (and how not to) get published.

Tuesday’s events began with a student roundtable discussion on open access moderated by ILS professor Cassidy Sugimoto. The four student panelists shared their thoughts on a variety of issues in open access, including types of OA, quality control, activism, power dynamics of publishers, disciplinary differences, and more. In the afternoon, Nicholas Wyant, Theresa Quill, and Christina Sheley showcased three different tools for finding open access resources in the social sciences: SSRN, American Fact Finder, and Open Street Map.

Shayna Pekala led a workshop on Wednesday morning introducing Open Journal Systems (OJS) software as a tool for publishing your open access journal. Jen Laherty followed on Thursday afternoon with an informative workshop on how to write a data management plan for an NSF grant proposal (for those of you who missed it, a recording is available here). She also explained the various options for storing data at IU and where to go for help with managing your data.

Naz Pantaloni gears up for his presentation on journal publishing agreements.
Naz Pantaloni gears up for his presentation on journal publishing agreements.

Naz Pantaloni wrapped the week up with a session on negotiating journal publishing agreements. He talked about the basics of copyright, what rights are typically negotiable, and how authors can use an Author Addendum to maximize their rights.

Overall it was a successful week with ample learning opportunities for students and faculty alike. A big thank you to all of the presenters, the Scholars’ Commons, and the Libraries for making these events possible!

What Open Access Means to Me

On October 21-25, IU celebrated International Open Access Week with a series of events to reflect on and educate the IU community about open access, including workshops, presentations, and round table discussions on topics ranging from data management to student publishing. As part of this series, we asked faculty and students to answer the question “What does open access mean to you?” and compiled their responses here.

To wrap up the discussion, I thought I would use this post to share my own response:

Open access offers something for everyone. For librarians and users, it creates a sustainable model of scholarly communication that fosters equal access to information. For universities and funding agencies, it accelerates research, supporting the mission to advance knowledge creation. For researchers and their home institutions, it creates an unparalleled opportunity for impact.

As a graduate student in the Department of Information and Library Science, I am excited by the ways libraries are playing an increasing role in the open access movement by providing open access publishing services, supporting institutional repositories, preserving open access materials through LOCKSS, and more. I strongly believe that the principles of open access align with the core values of librarianship, and it is something that I am proud to be a part of.

If you are interested in learning more about open access, the following list of resources is a great place to get started:

October 25th data visualization & management workshop for beginners

Gephi screenshot
Gephi screenshot from https://gephi.org/

Oct 25 2013
9:00am to 12:00pm
Wells Library Information Commons Instruction Cluster 1

Interested in using data visualization to enhance your research but don’t know where to begin? Learn how to use basic data visualization techniques and tools including Voyant, OpenRefine, Gephi, and Sci2 at our workshop, where we’ll give users the chance to test their skills using data from a variety of open data sources. Experts will also cover the best ways to manage your data throughout its lifecycle. No data visualization experience needed, but attendees should have a working knowledge of Microsoft Excel.

Register here: http://libprod.lib.indiana.edu/tools/workshops/workshop-listings/series-view/182/series

This workshop is part of Open Access Week 2013.

 

Highlights from Open Access Week 2012 at IUB

This year’s Open Access Week events at Indiana University-Bloomington were a resounding success. Due in large part to new cross-campus partnerships, the Scholarly Communication department was able to bring a series of six events to students and faculty from October 22-26.

Naz answers a question about how copyright law affects Open Access at Monday’s event

Librarians Jen Laherty and Nazareth Pantaloni kicked off the week on Monday with their talk “Making Your Work Open Access,” which focused on IU-specific resources for those new to OA publishing. Dr. Urs Schoepflin of Max Planck Gesellschaft fuer Wissenschaftsgeschichte (Berlin) gave a talk on Monday afternoon titled “Challenges for the Humanities: Scholarly Work and Publishing in the Digital Age.” The event, sponsored by Sawyer Seminar (Mellon Foundation), Catapult Center for Digital Humanities, and HPSC brought together faculty and librarians from across the campus for a great discussion on experiences in supporting Open Access digital humanities projects.

On Tuesday, Business/SPEA and Law School graduate students attended a lecture (co-sponsored by GPSO) led by Christina Sheley, Cindy Dabney, and Stacy Konkiel on how to use the popular subject repository, Social Science Research Network.

Will Cowan (Digital Library Program) explains the Oufinopo Database of public domain film noir clips at Wednesday’s event

Science was also on the mind of those who attended Wednesday’s DLP brown bag, “Open Data Visualizations for the Sciences and Humanities,” featuring researchers from across the campus that use visualizations based on open data to power their work. The event, which was the first brown bag held at the new IQ Wall in the Wells Library East Tower, was the week’s best attended.

Thursday’s grad student-focused brown bag, “Real Experiences with Open Access,” featured Dean David W. Lewis (IUPUI), who described the OA publishing landscape via video conference to audiences at

Graduate students listen to Dean David W. Lewis’s lecture on Open Access at Thursday’s brown bag event

IU Bloomington and IUPUI. The event, co-organized by IUB SLIS students Laura Manifold and Margaret Janz and librarian Kristi Palmer at IUPUI, and co-sponsored by the GPSO, was the most popular graduate student event of the week. Asked why she chose to participate in Open Access Week, Manifold explained, “I really believe Open Access is an integral part of the library’s future.  As an MLIS graduate student, it’s important to me to get my peers involved in what will be the norm for scholarship and research.” Janz agreed, adding: “Open Access is a great -and necessary- shift in scholarly communication, not just for graduate students, but for all scholars and researchers. It’s goes beyond issues of library budgets; open sharing of information is essential for advancing research on a global scale.”

Friday saw the final event for Open Access Week at IU Bloomington, “Complying with the NIH Public Access Mandate.” The workshop helped attendees understand the OA-friendly federal mandate, and showcased the tools used to make NIH-sponsored research freely available to the public.

The IU Libraries and the new Office of Scholarly Publishing rounded out the week by releasing a statement explaining their support for Open Access. The statement, available here on the Scholarly Communication Department’s blog, sums up the reasons why facilitating Open Access publishing is a priority for the Libraries.

The Scholarly Communication Department would like to thank the GPSO for their co-sponsorship of our events. We would also like to thank our workshop leaders, participants, and SLIS students Laura Manifold and Margaret Janz.

IU Libraries and Open Access

Dr. Katy Börner explains a visualization built on open Wikipedia data at the IU Libraries' Open Data Visualizations for the Sciences and Humanities brown bag on October 24, 2012.
Dr. Katy Börner explains a visualization built on open Wikipedia data at the IU Libraries’ Open Data Visualizations for the Sciences and Humanities brown bag on October 24, 2012.

The week of October 22-28 was designated as the sixth annual Open Access Week, during which members of the academic and research community across the globe hosted events to recognize and promote the value of open access publication. For IU Libraries, Open Access Week was an opportunity to introduce researchers and students to our many open access tools and experts, answer questions about these services and technologies, and help scholars discover new ways to engage with and benefit from open access publishing.

Facilitating open access publication is a priority for Indiana University Libraries. The IU Libraries exist to support all aspects of scholarship at IU – from providing materials, tools, and services for research to promoting innovation in teaching and learning. Increasingly, we are also called upon to develop and implement diverse channels for scholarly communications. While traditional publication methods remain essential to many disciplines, these new, highly accessible models offer scholars unprecedented opportunities for sharing their findings and engaging in real-time global discussions that can dramatically enhance their work.

Open access literature, as defined by Peter Suber of the Harvard Open Access Project, is “digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.” This type of publication can broaden the availability of research findings, forging greater connections among scholars and learners and increasing the pace at which discoveries can build upon one another. These capabilities call to mind the principles outlined in the Intellectual Freedom Manual of the American Library Association:

“Intellectual freedom can exist only where two essential conditions are met: first, that all individuals have the right to hold any belief on any subject and to convey their ideas in any form they deem appropriate, and second, that society makes an equal commitment to the right of unrestricted access to information and ideas regardless of the communication medium used, the content of work, and the viewpoints of both the author and the receiver of information.”  (Intellectual Freedom Manual. Introduction. 8th edition, 2010, p. xvii.)

Our continual goals are to uphold these principles of intellectual freedom, respond to the information resource needs of the communities we serve, and preserve information for future generations. To meet these objectives, we have developed a suite of library-based open access publishing services for Indiana University. Gathered under the heading of IUScholarWorks, these services enable researchers to preserve and share their work in a persistent online repository, store and archive their data in searchable formats, and even publish and manage new online journals that remain freely available worldwide.

For an increasing number of IU scholars, these and other open access tools represent a new frontier for scholarly communication. By removing restrictions in research availability and hastening the publication process, open access models capitalize on new technologies to create a thriving global network of interconnected scholars who can quickly respond to advancements within and beyond their fields.