IUScholarWorks Journals Now Minting DOIs

An example of an article with a DOI in the Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
An example of an article with a DOI in the Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.

IUScholarWorks is pleased to announce that we are now offering the ability to mint DOIs for IUScholarWorks journal content in partnership with CrossRef.

A DOI, or Digital Object Identifier, is a string of characters that uniquely identifies an online item and serves as a stable, permanent URL. This functionality makes it easier for online content to be discovered, used, and cited.

As part of IUScholarWorks’s agreement with CrossRef, journals that use this service are required to check for and include existing DOIs for all article citations. Therefore, we encourage journals with back content to issue DOIs only for prospective content (if your needs extend beyond this, please contact us).

Within OJS, the DOI plugin allows journal managers to configure the journal’s DOI settings, and the CrossRef XML Export plugin enables them to export metadata for deposit into the CrossRef database. Additionally, editors have the ability to add DOIs to article PDFs prior to publication.

To start issuing DOIs for your IUScholarWorks journal, please contact us at iusw@indiana.edu. Detailed instructions are also available on the IUScholarWorks wiki.

Social media metrics for IUScholarWorks content now available

An example altmetric.com report for content hosted on IUScholarWorks
An example report of altmetrics related to Jason Baird Jackson’s “Anthropology of/in Circulation: The Future of Open Access and Scholarly Societies,” uploaded to IUScholarWorks

For those who want to track metrics for the broader impact of the scholarship they’ve uploaded to the IUScholarWorks repository, we are pleased to announce that altmetrics badges and reports (powered by Altmetric.com) are now available, in addition to usage statistics.

Altmetrics are  social media metrics related to any scholarly output–a journal article, a data set, a working paper, or even a slide deck presented at a conference. The Altmetric.com service currently reports altmetrics for any scholarly content that has a DOI, Handle, PubMed ID, or ArXiv ID.

How it works

On any item record in our repository to which an Altmetric.com badge has been added, you’ll see the badge appear in the bottom of the left-hand navigation bar, under the “Statistics” section. (See an example here.) Hovering over the badge with your cursor, you can see an abbreviated report of the social media attention that item has received, including tweets, scholarly blog posts, and social bookmarks on services like Mendeley. By clicking on the badge, you’ll be taken to a full report on Altmetric.com, which offers a drill-down view into your social media metrics and demographics of those who have tweeted about your work.

If you already have content on IUScholarWorks to which you want to add a badge, email your collection administrator or the IUScholarWorks team. For new content, you’ll be given the option to add a badge during the deposit process; pay careful attention when filling out information during your next deposit.

Badges are publicly displayed. There is not yet ‘depositor-only’ access to the altmetrics for your repository content. Depositors wishing to privately view altmetrics for their research on IUScholarWorks repository can subscribe to Altmetric.com’s paid service or sign up for a free ImpactStory account. (Full disclosure: I am a recent hire of ImpactStory.)

Not interested in altmetrics? That’s fine, too. Badges are by default hidden on all existing and new deposits. The service is opt-in by design.

Why we have implemented this service

In talking with regular users of our service, we’ve learned that faculty and graduate students are keen to track how their scholarship is being consumed and shared, within the Academy and beyond. This service will allow interested users to do so.

We believe that an altmetrics reporting service will help scholars to better understand the nuances of what it means to be “impactful” in an an increasingly networked research environment. Our service surfaces a greater variety of impact measures, and can help scholars understand and connect with new audiences.

On a final note, it is also important to bear in mind that relevant quantitative measures of impact differ from discipline to discipline, and that altmetrics as currently conceived (and reported by Altmetric.com) may not meet the needs of historians as well as they do for biologists. As the field matures, we expect to support and experiment with emerging services in our repository.

To learn more about Altmetric.com, visit their website. More information about our implementation of altmetrics and usage statistics in the IUScholarWorks repository can be found on our website.

Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations at IU

My name is Shayna Pekala and I am thrilled to have joined the Scholarly Communication Department this fall as the IUScholarWorks Assistant. I would like to use this post to highlight one of the IUScholarWorks services I have worked with extensively over the last month: open access publishing of electronic theses and dissertations (ETDs).

What is this service and why is it important?

The IUScholarWorks ETD service allows you to make the full text of your ETD available online for free. The main benefits of using this service can be summed up in two words: preservation and accessibility. If you publish your ETD with IUScholarWorks, we will preserve your work in perpetuity, even as technology changes. In addition, by making your ETD open access in our repository, your work will be exposed to major search engines, rendering it more discoverable. (Fun fact: there have been several studies conducted like this one that show open access articles are cited more frequently than non-open access articles.)

How does the service work?

All graduate students must submit their ETDs through ProQuest via the Graduate School website. These submissions are automatically ingested into a dark archive (one that can’t be accessed by any users) within the IUScholarWorks repository. IU requires that permission from the copyright holder be obtained before these ETDs can be made openly accessible. So, graduate students must give us permission to release their ETD by filling out this form. Once permission has been received, an IUScholarWorks staff member goes into the system, releases the ETD, and poof! the ETD becomes open access.

If I make my ETD open access, will I still be able to publish it later on as a monograph or in a journal?

There is a widely held assumption that the majority of publishers consider openly accessible ETDs to be prior publications, thus precluding them from future publication. However, a study published in July 2013, “Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?”, found evidence to challenge this belief. The study reports that only 2.9% of journal publishers and 7.3% of university presses will not consider manuscripts derived from openly accessible ETDs under any circumstances. While the study concludes that submissions derived from ETDs are not considered prior publications by publishers, it is still advisable to check specific publisher policies if this is something you are considering.

What if I have more questions?

To learn more about open access publishing of ETDs at IU, check out our ETD webpage or email us at iuswetd@indiana.edu. You might also consult some of these resources:

Statistics now available in the IUScholarWorks Repository

The IUScholarWorks Repository is now providing usage statistics for all items.  When viewing an item (such as:  http://hdl.handle.net/2022/3253), click on the link:  View Usage Statistics in the bottom left corner of the navigation column.  The data available includes:

  • total monthly views
  • downloads of the files attached to the records
  • information about visitors from geographies: countries and cities

Currently the data provided includes April 2012 to present.  We will soon incorporate the use data from 2006 to April 2012.  Downloading the data is a future feature we hope to develop and provide.

We are excited to bring this new service to the Repository.  Please contact us with any questions:  iusw@indiana.edu.

Archiving Conference Works in IUScholarWorks Repository

The IUScholarWorks Open Access Research Repository can be an excellent archive for IU conference and workshop presentations in whatever form they take.  Often times these types of materials are difficult,  perhaps impossible, to locate after the event.  If there is value in preserving these materials and making them available at a permanent Internet location, please contact us.

To participate in the Repository, the rightsholder (in all likelihood, the presenter) needs to be able to accept the Repository’s non-exclusive license.  While it is best to have the license accepted before the event, it is possible to track down presenters from past events in order for their materials to be archived.

It is not necessary to have every presentation from a conference or workshop archived in the Repository.  It is possible to deposit the event program so that users may understand the full scope of the event when all presentations are not available.  It is also possible for rightsholders to opt for a Creative Commons license to their work when they elect to archive them in the Repository.

If this service could extend the value of a conference or workshop, please contact IUScholarWorks staff.   We will help devise a workflow for the responsible group that will result in a collection similar to the Latin American Music Center’s 50th Anniversary Cultural Counterpoints conference.

(#5) NSF Data Plan

Beginning January 18, 2011, proposals submitted to National Science Foundation (NSF) must include a supplementary document of no more than two pages labeled “Data Management Plan”. This supplementary document should describe how the proposal will conform to NSF policy on the dissemination and sharing of research results.  For full policy implementation, see the Grant Proposal Guide Chapter II.C.2.j.

The IU Libraries have worked with University Information Technology Service (UITS) and the Pervasive Technology Institute to develop templates and suggestions for completing the data management plan.  For more information, see the knowledge base article here.