IUScholarWorks Journals: More than Just a Hosting Service

The IUScholarWorks journal service helps you, the prospective journal editor, publish your journal in open access. While IUScholarWorks does not identify as the publisher of any of the journals we support, we do so much more than simply host your content. Here are some of the services we provide:

  • Indexing – We’ll make sure your journal articles show up in Google and Google Scholar.
  • ISSN registration – We’ll apply for an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) to uniquely identify your journal.
  • DOI registration – As a member of the DOI registration agency, CrossRef, we will help you assign and register Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to uniquely identify your articles.
  • Editorial workflow management – We’ll train you how to use Open Journal Systems (OJS) software to effectively manage your editorial workflows.
  • Cataloging – We’ll create a record for your journal in IUCAT and WorldCat.
  • Content preservation – We are committed to maintaining the content of your journal in perpetuity, even if ownership of the journal moves outside of IU. All of our journals are archived with CLOCKSS.
  • Copyright & Licensing – We will work with you to draft your journal’s copyright policy and can advise on how to license outside content for reuse in your journal.
  • Multimedia content support – Want to include audio or video content alongside your journal articles? We’ll help you use the Avalon Media System to make this possible.
  • Usage statistics –We’ll provide annual reports on article views for your journal.

As you can see, IUScholarWorks strives to go above and beyond simply providing a home for your journal on our server. If you are thinking about starting a new journal, or are interested in migrating your current journal to an open access publishing platform, please contact us at iusw@indiana.edu.

When Can I Deposit What? Everything You Need to Know about Permissions and Versions When Submitting to the Repository

Every time you submit an item to the IUScholarWorks repository, you must accept the IUScholarWorks License. By accepting our non-exclusive license, you acknowledge that you either own the copyright to the work you are depositing, or you have been granted permission by the copyright holder to deposit it. If you are depositing material that has already been published, you will first need to find out if you hold the copyright.

When you publish an article in a journal, copyright is typically transferred to the publisher (this will be indicated in your original publishing agreement). If the publisher owns the copyright to your work, you will need to check whether they allow you to deposit it in the institutional repository. Fortunately, most publishers have developed explicit policies that speak to this, so you often won’t need to contact them directly. You can search for a publisher’s copyright policy on their website, or use the Sherpa/Romeo database.

When publishers do allow you to deposit your work in an institutional repository, they frequently impose restrictions, such as an embargo period and/or the type of version permitted.

Embargoes

Publisher embargo periods can range anywhere from 6 to 24 months (and sometimes longer). If a publisher requires you to embargo your work, you can still deposit it in the institutional repository now and designate the amount of time after which it can be made openly available.

Version types

There are three types of versions that a publisher may or may not allow you to submit to the institutional repository:

Pre-print – a draft of an article before peer review

Post-print – the final, peer-reviewed article submitted for publication

Publisher PDF – the final, peer-reviewed article in the publisher’s typesetting and formatting

It’s important to note that content-wise, the post-print and the publisher PDF versions are identical. Many more publishers allow authors to deposit the post-print version in the repository than they do the publisher PDF version.

If you are ever unsure about what work you can or can’t deposit, please contact the IUScholarWorks Team.

Copyright and IUScholarWorks

So you want to submit a published or unpublished article into IUScholarWorks (IUSW) repository? Here’s what you’ll need to know about copyright.

If you are submitting an unpublished article, no worries – you are the rightsholder, so go ahead and submit it to IUSW. If you are submitting an article that has been previously published, though, you (the author) are probably not the rightsholder. If this is the case, you will need to do a little extra research before depositing into IUSW.

Generally, copyright transfers over to a publisher upon publication of an article, so you will need to check with the publisher prior to depositing it. If you still have your signed publishing agreement this should indicate what your rights are. If you don’t have this document, here are some suggestions to move forward.

  1. Your first step is to search SHERPA/RoMEO, a freely available online database of publisher copyright policies. Simply type in the name of your journal and you should receive information on what you can submit to an institutional repository such as IUSW. (For those new to S/R, this helpful video should clarify the search process and terminology.)
  2. If you cannot find information through SHERPA/RoMEO, you will want to check to see if the journal has a website. If so, copyright information may be located there.
  3. The final way to check copyright of an article is to contact the editor of the journal–not the publisher, which usually oversees many journals. It is helpful for the author of the work in question to write the message. We’ve found that this usually helps expedite the process. You can use a format like this sample letter to the editor. 

After completing these steps, you should now know what exactly can be deposited into IUSW: pre-print, post-print, or the publisher’s version of your article.

One easy way to save yourself this trouble moving forward is to complete the SPARC Author Addendum prior to signing your copyright over to a publisher. This legal document ensures that you keep the rights that you want, including the ability to archive your work in an institutional repository like IUSW. Read about the addendum to determine if it’s right for you!

Open Access, Copyright, Licensing, and IUScholarWorks

When most people hear the term, “open access,” they typically think of information that is freely accessible on the web; however, that only encompasses half of what open access stands for. Open access is not only about being able to obtain information for free, but it is also about being able to reuse that information freely, i.e. how that information is subsequently distributed, linked to, and built upon.

Image 1: Example of a derivative work, with green arrows pointing between the original and the new
Example of a derivative work. Retrieved from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File%3ADerivative-work-icon.svg

By default, you, the author, hold the copyright for every new work you create, meaning you alone have the right to distribute and create derivatives from it. The good news is you can waive this right by adding a Creative Commons License to your work, which explains to users what they may or may not do with it. For example, a CC-BY license tells users that they may distribute and create derivative works, as long as they attribute the original work to you.

Adding a Creative Commons license to your work in IUScholarWorks is a simple step. When you submit an item to the repository, you have the opportunity to specify the name of a license in the Rights field during the submission process. Remember, leaving this field blank means the that you reserve all rights to your work!

To learn more about licensing options, check out the Creative Commons website (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/) or contact the IUScholarWorks team.

(#18) Standing on the Shoulders of Giants

We began last month exploring why copyright plays in important role in scholarly communication by looking at one case – publishing.  Copyright also plays important roles in other ways that scholars do their work.  As Clifford Lynch has said, “The most fundamental part of research, teaching, and scholarly discourse is the ability to build upon both evidence and prior scholarship.” (Center for Intellectual Property Handbook, p. 154) This building upon requires both access to the material as well as the ability to use portions of it to build your own case, make an argument against it, or to perhaps to establish a common understanding within your field.  This ability to use other works is not just important; it is, to use Cliff’s word, fundamental.

Many of the questions that I receive are about the use of others’ copyrighted work.  Can I include this image in my paper?  Can I show this film clip in my class?  Many of these questions rely on those limitations I also touched upon last time.  To recap: Section 106 of the copyright law goes about defining the exclusive rights of authors and creators.  Sections 107 through 122 are about setting limits on those exclusive rights.  These are not exceptions to copyright law.  These are statute defined limitations on the exclusive rights of the author.  I believe this is a very important distinction as exceptions are generally thought of as a thing to be gotten rid of, but defined limitations has a very different connotation.

Scholars rely on many of these limitations in order to do their work.  The most frequently used sections of the copyright law in higher education are Sections 107 (the fair use section), Section 108 (specifically for libraries and archives), and Section 110 (deals with teaching).  These are not the only parts of the law that scholars rely on, but probably the most heavily used.  More on each of these in future posts.  For now, let’s just think about how important it is to have the ability to build upon the scholarship of others, teach about developments in a field, or to freely read about these areas of our choosing.

(#15) Copyright as the Center of the (Scholarly Communication) Universe

Whenever people think about Scholarly Communication, the first thing that comes to mind is probably not copyright.  They might think about the rising cost of journal subscriptions or new publishing methods or even think of putting their work on the web or in an institutional repository.  And while these are all valid first thoughts, copyright is generally only thought of after the fact.  Copyright should be a lot higher on the list for consideration.  Why?  Because copyright is the center of the scholarly communication universe!  And I’m not just saying that as the intellectual property librarian.  Ok, well maybe a little.  So, why is copyright so important in the scholarly communication universe?

Under US Copyright Law (US Code, Title 17), Section 106 grants authors certain exclusive rights as soon as they put their work into a fixed, tangible medium.  Sections 107 through 122 go about setting limitations on those exclusive rights, but for now, let’s just focus on the exclusive rights.  These rights include the ability to reproduce the copyrighted work, prepare derivative works, distribute the work, and display or perform the work publicly.  An author may share their work publicly on a web page or at a meeting or in any venue on their own as a means of spreading their work.  However, many authors want to publish their research or creative activity in a book or a journal in order to share their work.

For a publisher to make this work available, they must get permission from the author in order to reproduce (make copies) and distribute (in print or electronically) the author’s work as these are, up to this point, the exclusive rights belonging to the author.  This is where publishing agreements and copyright transfer agreements come in.  Some publishers have a policy in place that says that by sending them the article you are agreeing to have it published by them.  Thus, you are giving them permission.  Some publishers require not only permission, but an exclusive transfer of the copyright to them.  The transfer is exclusive in that the right was transferred and not retained by the author.  Exclusive transfers of copyright must be in writing, so this is why it is important to read the copyright transfer agreement carefully before you sign it.  Once an author exclusively transfers these rights, the author no longer has them.  This has many implications for the author and should be carefully considered.  For example, the author would generally no longer be able to reproduce or distribute their own paper without permission from the copyright owner (who is now the publisher) or by relying on another statute such as fair use.

There are arguments why an exclusive transfer is a good thing, and also arguments as to why they are a bad thing.  I’m not going there at the moment as this is a blog post and not a dissertation (although this is getting rather long).  Let’s suffice to say that ALL publishing requires at a minimum the permission of the original author.  This fact alone is why copyright plays such a central role in the way that scholars share their work from the publishing end of things.  Copyright plays important roles in other ways that scholars do their work, not just in publishing.  Think teaching, research, and other means of scholarly discourse.  I’ll be exploring these roles in a series of blog posts the first Monday of the month because copyright is just that important!  I hope you’ll join in the discussion.

(#10) View from the GA – A Reading on Copyright

Sherri Michaels and Jennifer Laherty have given me a series of readings about institutional repositories and the issues that affect them. I will be periodically posting my thoughts about these readings.

Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums, by Peter Hirtle, Emily Hudson, and Andrew T. Kenyon goes over copyright law as it affects and applies to digitization projects at libraries, museums, and other cultural institutions. This very detailed manual covers all the law’s parts and exemptions, with discussions of how they’ve changed over time. It also touches on trademark and privacy issues, especially as they apply to audio-visual materials. The text contains plenty of examples and case histories throughout, which keeps the discussions grounded in the real activities and problems of cultural institutions and their digitization projects. Hirtle, Hudson, and Kenyon have also included many tables, flowcharts, and checklists to help break down and map out the various steps and issues in dealing with copyright and permissions.
I found Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums extremely illuminating and helpful. The book was very well-organized and the progression through topics and parts of copyright law was logical and elegant. It was very readable, and contained almost no legalese. The authors frame solutions and approaches to copyright issues in terms of risk and its management rather than as a series of inflexible rules. This book gave me a better and fuller understanding of what the requirements, exceptions, and pitfalls are for library digitization projects. In addition, I gained a good perspective on copyright issues in the non-profit and educational environments.

Copyright and Cultural Institutions: Guidelines for Digitization for U.S. Libraries, Archives, and Museums is available for download at http://ecommons.library.cornell.edu/handle/1813/14142.

(#1) What is Scholarly Communication?

Welcome to the IU Libraries Scholarly Communication blog!  This blog will be a way to keep abreast of scholarly communications news and developments of interest to the IU community.  So what exactly is scholarly communication?  The Association of College and Research Libraries defines it as:

the system through which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use. The system includes both formal means of communication, such as publication in peer-reviewed journals, and informal channels, such as electronic listservs.”
(http://www.ala.org/ala/mgrps/divs/acrl/publications/whitepapers/principlesstrategies.cfm )

As you can see from this definition, we’ll be covering a wide-range of topics covering all stages of the research and dissemination process.  Since copyright plays an important role in this area, we’ll be throwing quite a bit of that in as well.  If you’re looking for more information about a particular topic, just let us know and we’ll try to cover it.  Welcome to the blog!