Reflections on 2014 and What’s to Come in 2015

With 21 journals and over 11,000 digital items published in its own iterations of Open Journal Systems (OJS) and DSpace, respectively, IUScholarWorks (IUSW) has led a crusade to cultivate the progression of erudition through the preservation and diffusion of academic studies conducted by the scholars of Indiana University.

In 2014, IUSW built new services and partnerships, and continued to strengthen its existing programming. Early in the year, IUSW introduced the option for editors and authors to obtain Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for works in both OJS and DSpace. Collaborations with the Avalon Media System team enabled IUSW to streamline the process for integrating multimedia into journal publications through the use of the Avalon Media Player. During the internationally celebrated Open Access Week in October, representatives from across the Libraries, IU Press, and the School of Informatics and Computing led discussions on topics related to open access and the scholarly publishing enterprise, including author’s rights, data management, and electronic publishing platforms.

IUSW has high hopes for what it will be able to accomplish during 2015, especially in regard to expanding its services. In response to requests from journal editors, IUSW has been working with the IU Press to be able to provide supplemental print copies of online journal issues. IUSW also aims to extend the ability to add Altmetric badges to journal articles in OJS, which is currently implemented in DSpace. Finally, IUSW will continue testing software solutions for an open access approach to conference management. With a successful beta run by the Indiana University Undergraduate Research Conference (IUURC20), IUSW hopes to be formally offering this service in the near future. Check back on the blog for reports on our progress!

To learn more about all things open access, feel free to stop by the consultation rooms in the Scholars’ Commons on Wednesdays 3-5pm to ask Shayna Pekala any questions you may have. Check out another open access project IUSW is working on: OpenFolklore.

Hindsight: Journal of Optometry History makes its back issues Open Access

(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric C. Tretter/Released)
(U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Eric C. Tretter/Released)

Hindsight: Journal of Optometry History, edited by Indiana University professor David Goss and published by the Optometric Historical Society, has released its back issues (1970-2010) with help from the IU Libraries Scholarly Communication department and the IU Libraries Digitization Lab. With the release, Hindsight becomes the longest continuous running journal with the largest amount of backfiles available in the IU open access publishing system.

The journal will continue to release “new” material (with a 2 year embargo). Bookmark the journal’s new website or “subscribe” to the journal’s mailing list to be updated when new content is added.

(#13) IUScholarWorks Journals

IUScholarWorks includes a service for managing and publishing IU faculty and graduate student edited journals.  If you’re interested in getting a handle on the editorial workflow process (i.e., less email in your personal inbox!) or if you’re interested in pursuing an open access publishing business model for your journal, please contact us to talk about the possibilities.

We support the OJS software platform.  OJS = Open Journal Systems and is a product of the Public Knowledge Project.  The OJS software is a robust content management system for managing the editorial work of the journal.  It includes support for author submissions – including agreement to the journal’s copyright policy, peer review – including reviewer forms, and the editorial work for sections.  At its core is a large database that keeps track of all the communications between the involved scholars as well as all the article versions produced along the way.

OJS can also publish your journal if it is based on an open access publishing model – meaning free and available to the world on the internet. OJS provides RSS feeds for tables of contents to readers and you can allow readers to make comments on the content.

Please review the journals that publish with IUScholarWorks Journals.  Please know that we can support the editorial work if you publish with another publisher.  We can also address archiving open access backfiles if a journal could benefit from such a service.  No matter what option you choose, if you partner with IUScholarWorks Journals your content will be highly discoverable by search engines – including Google Scholar, the IU Libraries along with our partners in the Digital Library Program will take measures to preserve the content for the foreseeable future, and we will provide article level use statistics that are of value to both authors and editors.

(#8) Teaching Scholarly Communication

I’ll be on research leave most of November to explore ways to teach and discuss scholarly communication issues with graduate students.  My plan is to develop a workshop that could be delivered in 2-4 hours with the help and support of colleagues such as academic department graduate student advisors, subject librarians, and staff in the IUScholarWorks department.

I will be working to develop lesson plans and exercises that will focus the workshop discussions on the following interconnected scholarly communication issues:

  • budgets
  • libraries
  • author rights
  • open access
  • labor
  • versions
  • digital content
  • preservation

The ultimate goal is to inform students about these issues and give them some tools to help them guide their path forward as authors.  They will have many decisions to make as they progress as researchers in their respective fields and I feel it is important that librarians be a part of their education on these matters.

I will also conduct a literature review and will refer to various projects being led by library colleagues around the United States who are developing similar approaches to teaching scholarly communications to students.

Please look for a progress report I will make in December, and I hope to see you in one of our future workshops.

(#2) What is an institutional repository?

I’d like to introduce you to IUScholarWorks Repository and explain what it can do for you, the IU researcher.

A definition of institutional repository (IR) by Clifford Lynch, Director of the Coalition for Networked Information :

“a university-based institutional repository is a set of services that a university offers to the members of its community for the management and dissemination of digital materials created by the institution and its community members. It is most essentially an organizational commitment to the stewardship of these digital materials, including long-term preservation where appropriate, as well as organization and access or distribution.” (2003; http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/br226ir.pdf)

IUScholarWorks Repository is an open access institutional repository and serves as a place to permanently archive research materials in any format such as:

  • Previously published materials (articles, book chapters, etc.)
  • Conference works and unpublished scholarly works
  • Lectures
  • Data files and databases

Understanding open access. Peter Suber, an  independent policy strategist for open access to research, provides a useful definition:

“Open-access (OA) literature is digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions.” (2004, revised 2010; http://www.earlham.edu/~peters/fos/overview.htm)

How does a researcher get started with the IUScholarWorks Repository?
IU Researchers should contact the IUScholarWorks administrator (me, Jennifer Laherty) via email at iusw@indiana.edu or jlaherty@indiana.edu if you are interested in depositing your research materials.  Together and often with assistance from Sherri Michaels, the Intellectual Property Librarian at IU Bloomington, we will determine if you have the rights to deposit your research materials, or if we need to seek permission from the rightsholder in order to make the deposit.  For each item submitted to the repository, the rightsholder must agree to the non-exclusive IUScholarWorks Repository license.

Although it should seem that the author is the rightsholder to the material, this is not often the case for materials already published, such as articles and book chapters.  In most cases, an author transfers a cadre of copyrights to their publisher in a copyright transfer agreement.  It is important to understand which rights were transferred in order to determine if the author has the right to post their work to an open access institutional repository.  We can help navigate to answer this question.  For students desiring to deposit their research, it may be done with permission of their academic department.

Once the copyright situation is figured out, research may be deposited.  Here’s a very short list of some interesting materials in IUScholarWorks:

Some words about access and preservation
IUScholarWorks Repository makes your research freely and broadly available to a worldwide audience (open access); it uses technology (DSpace) and metadata standards (the Open Archives Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting, OAI-PMH) to ensure your works are more findable on the Internet; and the Libraries take care to archive and preserve your works for future generations.  IUScholarWorks is privileged to have support from the IU Digital Library Program, a a collaborative effort of the IU Libraries and University Information Technology Services in its efforts to achieve its mission.