IUScholarWorks: Share and preserve your work in IU’s institutional repository

The IUScholarWorks repository is one of the open scholarship services at Indiana University Libraries.  It provides a platform to make the research, instructional tools, and creative activities of IU scholars freely available, while ensuring these resources are curated, discoverable and preserved for the future. Faculty and graduate students can freely deposit their work in IUScholarWorks. Undergraduate students who have faculty permission can also make their work digitally and freely available.

Whether you want to share your work with the university or the world, build a digital collection of your work in one place, or you need to share your work in order to comply with a grant, the repository supports sharing  a wide variety of materials, including:

You can also use IUScholarWorks to create a central space for published work e.g. related articles, questionnaires, manuals, underlying data, methodologies, presentations, protocols, and course syllabi.  Use our CV Service to do this, or create a research collection on IU ScholarWorks

Depositing your work in the IUScholarWorks repository makes your work more discoverable, easy to cite, and provides metrics on use.  Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work.  Each deposit is assigned a persistent URL such as a handle, or a DOI.  IUScholarWorks is indexed by major search engines, such as Google Scholar.  

Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work, regardless of whether they are associated with Indiana University.

You can link your work that is deposited in the institutional repository with your Google Scholar profile, or your ORCID record. Google Scholar profiles are one of the most common tools used by researchers to publicize and track their work, receive alerts about new citations, and gather metrics for promotion and  tenure dossiers.

ORCID is a unique identifier connecting you with your entire scholarly record, not just your publications. You can connect your ORCID with publications,  grant funding, organizations at which you have worked or studied, and other identifiers.

ORCID can automatically update this information if you choose to set up that option.  Having an ORCID increases the accuracy, transparency, and visibility of your scholarly record.

You can post the IUScholarWorks link for your work or collection to ORCID or on professional online communities and social media platforms such as personal or departmental blogs, LinkedIn, Twitter, or other social networking resources used by scholars. When posting to social network platforms, it’s a good idea to write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important.

Tip: Write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important, then post the summary and a link to the item in IUScholarWorks on the platform of your choice.

Remember that your affiliation with Indiana University or similar institutions affords you information privilege that others do not enjoy, by giving you a high level of access to “research material, including journal articles, data, and primary sources…. access to additional research support, faculty, and a peer network, [and] the opportunity to build upon existing research and enter the scholarly conversation”.

There are plenty of people who might need access to your studies–scholars from small institutionslow-income countriespatient advocatespatients themselvescitizen scientists, and members of the general public. Publishing open access will enable a wide range of persons to access and learn from your work.

Your work is worth sharing!  Register on IUScholarworks today (https://scholarworks.iu.edu/deposit) , and email iusw@indiana.edu for authorization to deposit your work in IUScholarWorks!

 

New Issue of International Journal of Designs for Learning (IJDL) Published

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department graduate assistant Jenny Hoops. 

The International Journal of Designs for Learning (IJDL) has published its second issue of 2017, continuing a long tradition of working with IU Libraries and IU Press in order to provide open access to a wide variety of content. IJDL has been publishing since 2010, but as a result of the collaboration between the Office of Scholarly Publishing and the journal’s team of editors, several key changes have improved the journal’s online presence. The journal has recently minted DOIs for their most recent articles as well as all the articles in their archive, ensuring easier discovery and identification of the journal’s content.

IJDL is dedicated to providing publishing opportunities for designers from all disciplines, recording various methodologies, debates, and materials dealing with the design process in an open access format. The journal aims to reach a broad audience of designers at every level of education, from complete novices and students to experienced teachers and designers. As a publication of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology, the improvement of education through technology remains a constant focus of the scholarship of the International Journal of Designs for Learning.

Articles from the newest issue such as “Designing Authentic and Engaging Personas for Open Education Resources Designers” highlight IJDL’s dedication to open scholarship and learning. This article helps inform readers on how to craft engaging, authentic, and useful personas for designers open education resources. Another article, “Confessions of Novice Designers and Their Instructor”, examines the multidisciplinary nature of design, utilizing a graduate-level message design course as a compelling case study. Students of the course completed small, client-based design projects as instructors worked to give them the most effective feedback possible, ultimately creating an honest and interesting dialogue for the reader to examine. This issue also features works from the Student Design Case SLAM, the results of an intensive one day workshop for graduate students at the 2016 Association for Educational Communications and Technology Convention in Las Vegas. These students worked to create a publishable design casing, acting as writer, designer, and editor for each other’s projects.

The most recent issue of IJDL is the journal’s eighth volume and this year’s final issue. The International Journal of Designs for Learning publishes semi-annually and is available in the Directory of Open Access Journals.

Why DOI?

Image 1: Oprah with text “You get a DOI, everything gets a DOI”While many researchers have heard of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), some may not know why and when they should be used. The single most important characteristic of DOIs is that they can be attached to just about any digital, online research output. If something has a URL, or a specific location on the web, it can be assigned a DOI. The versatility of DOIs means they can be tied to journal articles, datasets, supplemental material and addendum; to video, audio, streaming media, and 3D objects; to theses, dissertations, technical reports, and visualizations. More recently, DOIs are being assigned to pre-prints of articles, acknowledging the pre-print’s role in some disciplines to be as valuable as the published version.

Why does this matter? As the APA Style Blog explains,

The DOI is like a digital fingerprint: Each article receives a unique one at birth, and it can be used to identify the article throughout its lifespan, no matter where it goes. (https://shar.es/1VECYv)

This digital fingerprint grows in importance as we move into an era that scholar Péter Jacsó has described as a “metadata mega mess.” Keyword searches by title or author in Google, for example, and even Google Scholar, which relies on mechanisms rather than unique IDs, often return inaccurate information: titles are attributed to the wrong authors, especially those with common names; citations of articles are mistaken for the original article; publication years become volume numbers; and a score of other inaccuracies. Researchers who rely on Google Scholar often quip that the service provides an easy way to begin a citation search, but that sources must be verified by DOI through Crossref and other registries. An article with a DOI reduces its risk of becoming lost in this “metadata mega mess” (Péter Jacsó, “Metadata mega mess in Google Scholar”, Online Information Review 2010: 34.1: 175-191, https://doi.org/10.1108/14684521011024191).

The second essential feature of the DOI is that it is persistent. As a unique identifier, it enables digital objects to be found anywhere, anytime with a one simple click on a link. This means that a paper or dataset is accessible and discoverable without requiring a separate search. Incorporated into a citation, the DOI becomes a guaranteed location for the item cited because it will always resolve to the right web address (URL). When attached to a resource, the DOI is also machine-readable, supporting online discovery as well as targeted aggregations and indexes.

The Anatomy of a DOI
Every DOI has three parts:

anatomy of a doi diagram
Source: http://www.ands.org.au/online-services/doi-service/doi-policy-statement. CC-BY
  • Resolving Web Address. Like web addresses (URLs), DOIs enable research output to be discoverable and accessible. Online publishing and digital archiving have made them almost a necessity for scholarship, and they have become the de facto standard for identifying research output.
  • Prefix. The prefix is the beginning of a unique, alphanumeric ID that irrefutably represents a digital object, and as such it creates an actionable, interoperable, persistent link to the work. The prefix is almost always associated with the entity or organization, and can allow users to trace the digital material back to its source.
  • Suffix. The final part of the alphanumeric ID is unique to its assigned object.  Integrity of DOIs are guaranteed because they do not rely alone on URLs and the web’s DNS (Domain Name System) servers for resolution. A DOI, then, is both an online location and a unique name and description of a specific digital object. Moreover, while the DOI base infrastructure is a species of the Handle System, DOIs run on a managed global network dedicated to their resolution.

A recent data DOI created for a data set in the IUScholarWorks repository (https://doi.org/10.5967/K8SF2T3M) illustrates one of our unique prefix “shoulders” (10.5967/K8) and a randomly generated alphanumeric string that is unique to this object (SF2T3M). Our open access journal system, on the other hand, is configured to create DOIs that are more semantic and tell us more about the object. This DOI (https://doi.org/10.14434/v17i3.21306) also has a unique prefix for Indiana University’s open journal system (10.14434). What’s more, the rest of the ID tells us that it is from Volume 17, Issue 3, article number 21306 of its originating journal.

So, Why DOI?
The short answer is that DOIs increase the reach and impact of your work. Publishers, repositories, aggregators, indexers, and providers of research and academic profiles are now relying on DOIs to identify specific works accurately, which in turn more reliably links that work to its authors and creators. Furthermore, metadata and information about individual works are increasingly tied to DOIs.

Crossref — one of the largest providers of DOIs for publications and the provider of DOIs for our open journal program — continues to expand the metadata that can be tied to DOIs, thereby increasing what your work can do in the world. The Scholarly Communication Department plans to deploy two specific Crossref programs that use DOIs to improve the accuracy and accessibility of usage data, bibliometrics, research profiles, and altmetric impact. Cited-by uses an object’s DOI to track where and how a digital publication or data has been cited, and can be displayed alongside an article with other metadata, such as authors’ bios (https://www.crossref.org/services/cited-by). Event Data, a program currently being rolled out by Crossref, goes even further. It will leverage the increasing ubiquity of DOIs to enhance the metrics available to scholars for their work. Known commonly as altmetrics, Event Data will collect a publication’s appearance on social media and online communities, such as Wikipedia, Reddit, Twitter, Stack Exchange, and blog posts (https://www.crossref.org/services/event-data).

Furthermore, for any research products — from software and datasets to technical reports and presentations –created and authored by IU faculty, staff, and students that do not have a previously assigned DOI, the IUScholarWorks Repository can mint them free-of-charge for any and all submissions.