IU Bloomington Open Access Article Publishing Fund

Are you interested in publishing a manuscript in an open access journal, but concerned about securing funds to pay the article processing charge (APC)? The IU Libraries and Office of the Vice Provost for Research have collaborated to establish a new Open Access Article Publishing Fund for faculty on the IU Bloomington campus. Faculty may apply for up to $2,000 to cover the article processing charges associated with eligible journal articles.

break through publishing barriersFund FAQ

Eligibility

Who is eligible for the Open Access Article Publishing Fund?

IU Bloomington tenured, tenure-eligible, and non-tenure-track faculty, research scientists, research scholars, research center directors, and librarians are eligible.

What kinds of publications are eligible for funding?

Peer-reviewed journal articles in journals that meet the following criteria are eligible:

  • The journal is fully open access (ie, the journal provides immediate, unfettered access to all articles)
  • The journal is either: listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association or adheres to its code of conduct, or a publisher that Indiana University Bloomington believes is taking a sustainable and affordable approach to open access publishing

How do I find out if my journal is eligible?

Contact the Scholarly Communication Department.


Co-authorship

What if I have non-IU Bloomington co-authors on the manuscript?

In the case of an article with multiple non-IU co-authors, each author is responsible for a prorated portion of any publishing fees. For example, for an article with three authors that is to appear in a journal with a $3,000 publication fee, each author is responsible for $1,000 of that fee.

What if I have IU Bloomington faculty co-authors on the manuscript?

In the case of an article with multiple IU Bloomington authors, each author is responsible for a prorated portion of any publishing fees. For example, for an article with two authors that is to appear in a journal with a $2,000 publication fee, each IU Bloomington author may apply for up to $1,000

What if I have IUPUI co-authors on the manuscript?

IUPUI has its own IUPUI Open Access Fund. Applicants with IU Bloomington/ IUPUI co-authored manuscripts are encouraged to contact the Scholarly Communication Department to coordinate joint applications.

What if I have student co-authors on the manuscript?

The fund will not count student authors when splitting APC responsibility among co-authors. For example, in the case of a manuscript with one IU Bloomington faculty author, one IU Bloomington graduate student, and one non-IU Bloomington faculty author with an APC of $2,000, each faculty author would be responsible for 50% of the APC, and the IU Bloomington faculty author could apply for up to $1,000 in funding to cover the cost of 50% of the APC.


Payment

If my application is accepted, how will the APC be paid?

The Open Access Article Publishing Fund will pay publisher invoices directly – reimbursement is not possible and authors with approved applications will not pay for APCs from personal or research funds. More details will be sent upon approval.

Are there strings attached?

We do ask that all fund recipients deposit their published article in our institutional repository and complete a brief survey, but there are no additional requirements.


Application

How do I apply for the fund?

To read more about the fund and to apply, visit the OVPR internal funding opportunity page here: https://research.iu.edu/funding-proposals/funding/opportunities/open-access-journal-fund/index.html

Who can I contact with questions?

Questions may be directed to the IU Libraries (iusw @ indiana.edu ) or the OVPR (ovprgrnt @ indiana.edu).

Jenny Hoops: Our New Open Access Publishing Manager

We’re very excited to share that Jenny Hoops will begin as the department’s new Open Access Publishing Manager on January 7, 2019. In this role, Jenny will provide user support for the department’s journal program and institutional repository. Jenny will also oversee the creation of documentation to support users and contribute feature requests to our development team in order to improve systems and workflows. Jenny will take over for Richard Higgins, who previously served as Open Access Publishing Manager. He joined the Library Technologies Unit in October 2018 as a Programmer/Analyst and continues to work closely with the department.

photo of jenny hoops

Previously, Jenny served as Digital Publishing Assistant in the Scholarly Communication Department, collaborating with SC staff to lead and assess several projects. Jenny is currently completing her Library Science degree. Her research interests include open publishing trends and digital accessibility/literacy. Before coming to IU, she completed a bachelor’s degree in history and gender/sexuality studies at Grinnell College. 

Please join me in welcoming Jenny to the Libraries!

Journal of Academic Advising Publishes Inaugural Issue

The Scholarly Communication department is excited to share that the Journal of Academic Advising (JAA), a recently launched open access publication, has published its first issue. This journal focuses on fostering interdisciplinary communication and collaboration between academic advising professionals through the publishing of research relating to different aspects of advising. The publication of the first issue coincides with NACADA’s annual national conference for academic advisors, where JAA editorial staff will participate in two special sessions: “Expanding Scholarship in Advising Through a New Journal” and “So You Want to be a Scholar: Fostering a Research Environment.”

Cover of Journal of Academic Advising's first issue

 

JAA’s inaugural issue focuses on sustainability and innovation in academic advising, a theme that is highlighted in Cheryl Wanko’s “Advising for Sustainability: A Challenge.” Wanko, an English professor and the chair of the Committee for Advising Excellence at West Chester University, asks how universities and advising can “cultivate more sustainable behaviors and life perspectives to help alter our culture’s self-destructive course” (p. 7), and how daily advising practices can promote awareness of environmental sustainability efforts. Kay S. Hamada, Assistant Specialist and Academic Advisor at the University of Hawai’i Mānoa, also contributed to JAA’s first issue with an article entitled “A Conceptual Framework for Disruptive Innovation in Advising.” Hamada discusses the various ways in which advancements in technology and other services necessitate changing how advising practices are approached. She terms this innovation as being “disruptive” because it often alters the theories and frameworks that have helped create existing practices.

The Journal of Academic Advising asks important questions about the impact that advisers and advising can have, outside of their traditional roles. JAA is completely open access, providing an audience for the content that may extend beyond the field of advising. The Scholarly Communication Department looks forward to the ideas and perspectives that this journal will bring to the table in further issues.

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Portrayal of Scientists in Children’s Books

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department student assistant Regine Vincent.

Through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and the Indiana University Press, readers everywhere have access to 30+ scholarly  journals and scholarly publications free of charge. One of these journals is The Hoosier Science Teacher.

The Hoosier Science Teacher aims to “provide science educators in Pre-K-12 classrooms, informal education, home schools, and college classrooms with ideas and resources for teaching science…[and publish] content that may help support effective teaching of science and professional development for science educators.” First published in 1975 by The Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc. (HASTI), The Hoosier Science Teacher published regularly in print until 2014. In 2017, publication of the Teacher resumed electronically.  All of the journal’s content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s Managing Editor, Matthew J. Benus, is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the IU Northwest School of Education and a Think Tank & Strategic Consultant for Science & Learning.

Published biannually, the most recent volume of the journal Volume 40 Issue 1 (2018) contains 7 articles covering a variety of topics from lessons and demonstrations and instructional insight to curriculum and learning environments. One of the articles in the current issue is entitled “How Scientists are Portrayed in NSTA Recommends Books” and is authored by Kevin D. Finson and Cecile Arquette of Bradley University and Donna Farland-Smith of The Ohio State University. Finson, Arquette, and Smith argue that while “there was much consistency in how scientists were portrayed in the books across the three years…there were also issues with appropriate numbers of representations of minorities, women, and age of scientists.”

The authors focus on how depictions of scientists in school books affect children’s “perceptions of scientists,” as such perceptions impact students’ “understanding about where scientists work and what they do,” students’ attitudes towards science, as well as students’ success in science learning. While determining exactly how students develop their view of scientists is not easy, they find that media sources have the largest influence or impact. Stereotypes of scientists as older, white males in children’s literature has implications for children that do not identify with these portrayals. Such portrayals can affect students’ “formation of science identity,” which affects “one’s perception that he/she can be a successful investigator in science contexts and is viewed by others as being competent in science.”

Seeing as depictions of scientists in school books have major impacts on students’ interactions with and views of the field of science, tackling the issue of stereotypical depictions is a must. The authors suggest that one way to address this issue is through  “the use of science trade books and picture books in instruction…[teacher-planned] student-centered activities that give [students] opportunities to explore their world and encourage them to think of themselves as scientists.”

The Hoosier Science Teacher’s commitment to open access and immediate availability makes it an immediately accessible and useful resource for teachers. According to Education Week Teacher, educators around the United States spend more than $1 billion dollars a year out-of-pocket on school supplies and resources for their students. This is particularly troubling for schools serving lower-income neighborhoods where, according to NPR, “teachers in high-poverty schools often find themselves digging even deeper into their own pockets.” Access to publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher may help educators to alleviate some of the out-of-pocket costs that they encounter when trying to access needed resources and literature on experimental approaches for their students and their teaching. 

The IU Libraries is committed to diverse collections and perspectives, as the Libraries Diversity Strategic Plan notes that “diversity is… essential to the intellectual vitality of the university.” The Scholarly Communication department shares this commitment and aims to highlight IU’s diversity through our journal publishing program and through supporting publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher.

OSP and IU Open Journals: FAQ

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department Graduate Student Jenny Hoops. 

Founded in 2012 by Indiana University Provost Lauren Robel, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) is a collaboration between IU Press and the scholarly publishing activities at IU Libraries aimed at furthering the enterprise of scholarly publishing at IU and beyond. Within the OSP, IU Press members provide invaluable expertise in journal production, copyediting, and marketing, alongside IU Libraries representatives, who provide consultation on intellectual property matters, digital preservation of scholarly research, public outreach for publishing initiatives across campus, and encourage the utilization of open access publishing models. The Office of Scholarly Publishing serves as an essential venue for the publishing activities of faculty, students, and staff of Indiana University.

With the current migration to the latest Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3 update—the online journals hosting platform for IUScholarWorks and IU Press journals—we continue to receive questions about the Office of Scholarly Publishing and the services it provides. We hope to clarify these below, as well as offer information to those who are interested in the suite of  publishing services available to OSP journals and partners.  

What kind of content does the Office of Scholarly Publishing handle?

The Office of Scholarly Publishing primarily deals with open access journal content, but OSP representatives are available to consult with IU faculty and staff about the publication of other kinds of scholarly materials. Last fall, the OSP helped Kelley School of Business instructors create four different eTexts for their courses using the PressBooks platform, for example. Anyone affiliated with IU that is interested in open access publishing is encouraged to contact the OSP to discuss their project in more detail.

What is the difference between IU Open Journals and Office of Scholarly Publishing journals?

Both IU Open Journals and OSP journals utilize Open Journal Systems, an online journal publishing platform developed by the Public Knowledge Project. The IU Open Journals program offers a digital publishing platform for any editorial team associated with Indiana University. There are minimal restrictions to becoming an IU Open Journal as only an affiliation with IU and a regular publication schedule are necessary. Peer review is not required, and pieces of work not often found in academic journals—such as memos or experimental art/poetry—can find a place of publication with this program. Our IU Open Journal service is an excellent place for any serial publication, including more non-traditional forms of scholarship, to receive support and hosting in order to make publication possible.

In contrast, Office of Scholarly Publishing journals are a select set of journals that are more academically rigorous, usually exclusively faculty peer-reviewed and faculty-authored publications.  The OSP will assess journal candidates to determine if a new journal is a potential OSP journal. If it is, it will be supported by the OSP while IU Open Journals will receive support from IUScholarWorks and the Scholarly Communication Department at IU Libraries.

What services does the Office of Scholarly Publishing offer?

The Office of Scholarly Publishing offers assistance with new journal setup, editorial team education for journal workflow and website management, technical support with Open Journal Systems (OJS) software, increased user access and discoverability thorough indexing and metrics, and digital preservation of online content. OSP brokers copyediting, typesetting,  and on-demand printing services and its staff are able to consult with editorial teams on marketing and design needs.

I’m in interested in starting a new publication with Indiana University. How do I start this process?

Contact iusw@indiana.edu to start set-up for a potential new journal. We will work with you to figure out whether or not your publication should be supported by IU Open Journals or the Office of Scholarly Publishing, and then provide you with outreach and technical support for Open Journal Systems.