cOAlition S: The Future of Research

On September 4th of this year, Open Access advocates and scientists around the world woke up to some big news: eleven European national research agencies, the European Commission, and the European Research Council (which represents all the national scientific organizations of European Union member states) announced that they were launching cOAlition S which will require all research funded by these organizations to be fully Open Access by January 1st 2020.

This is a major coup for Open Access activists and a step in the right direction for worldwide scientific research. Not only will cutting-edge and high quality research papers be easy and free for anyone to access, but this will also help to kick-start innovation among open access publications  and encourage more institutions, funders and scientists to be deliberate in choosing an Open Access journals and platforms for their research.

Along with this requirement, the cOAlition S announced ten guiding principles in their Plan S, which I will break down below:

Copyright:

•  Authors retain copyright of their publications without restrictions. All publications must be published under an open license, preferably the Creative Commons Attribution Licence CC BY. In all cases, the license applied should fulfill the requirements defined by the Berlin Declaration;

Perhaps  one of the most important guiding principles of Open Access, Plan S recognizes that authors should a) retain copyright to their work, b) get credit for the work they do, and c) enable anyone to share, adapt, remix, and build upon their work. You can also read more about CC-BY in this fantastic post by the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association.

Funding and Organization

•  The Funders will ensure jointly the establishment of robust criteria and requirements for the services that compliant high quality Open Access journals and Open Access platforms must provide
•  In case such high quality Open Access journals or platforms do not yet exist, the Funders will, in a coordinated way, provide incentives to establish and support them when appropriate; support will also be provided for Open Access infrastructures where necessary;
•  The ‘hybrid’ model of publishing is not compliant with the above principles;

These three points are absolutely crucial to understanding–the Funders are clearly spelling out their support for establishing platforms, services, journals, and incentives for the publication of scientific research. They are also saying that even if these routes of publication do not yet exist that they will support them. What this means is that we may begin to see increasing academic, financial and intellectual support behind OA platforms, journals and monographs. Finally, they are taking the stance that hybrid models are not compliant with their principals, and that they will support increasing openness. A hybrid model is, for example, when a journal will allow authors to make their article open access–but only for a fee. cOAlition S is taking steps to do away with this hybrid model.

Institutional Support

•  Where applicable, Open Access publication fees are covered by the Funders or universities, not by individual researchers; it is acknowledged that all scientists should be able to publish their work •  Open Access even if their institutions have limited means;
When Open Access publication fees are applied, their funding is standardised and capped (across Europe);
•  The Funders will ask universities, research organisations, and libraries to align their policies and strategies, notably to ensure transparency;
•  The importance of open archives and repositories for hosting research outputs is acknowledged because of their long-term archiving function and their potential for editorial innovation;

These four bullet points show that the Funders are bringing real heavyweight institutional support to the forefront of the agenda. The first point especially, that the Funders or author universities will cover the cost of publication fees is momentous for researchers. As covered in great detail by Nature and Paywall: The Movie, the fees charged to authors who want to make their articles Open Access can be burdensome. Additionally, the policy of standardizing Open Access fees will help to bring down costs across disciplines in Europe.

It is notable that cOAlition S gives high praise to archives, libraries and repositories. As demonstrated by our own experience at IU, institutional repositories like IU ScholarWorks and IU Scholarworks Open are great ways to distribute Open Access research as they allow access by an international community of learners to research and information.

The Plan S goal is that all journal and other non-book scholarly work should be Open Access by 1 January 2020–and they that they will monitor compliance and sanction non-compliance. You can read more about cOAlition S, the member organizations, and their plans here.

Plan S is an exciting Open Access breakthrough that promises a more accessible and transparent future for research.

Journal of Academic Advising Publishes Inaugural Issue

The Scholarly Communication department is excited to share that the Journal of Academic Advising (JAA), a recently launched open access publication, has published its first issue. This journal focuses on fostering interdisciplinary communication and collaboration between academic advising professionals through the publishing of research relating to different aspects of advising. The publication of the first issue coincides with NACADA’s annual national conference for academic advisors, where JAA editorial staff will participate in two special sessions: “Expanding Scholarship in Advising Through a New Journal” and “So You Want to be a Scholar: Fostering a Research Environment.”

Cover of Journal of Academic Advising's first issue

 

JAA’s inaugural issue focuses on sustainability and innovation in academic advising, a theme that is highlighted in Cheryl Wanko’s “Advising for Sustainability: A Challenge.” Wanko, an English professor and the chair of the Committee for Advising Excellence at West Chester University, asks how universities and advising can “cultivate more sustainable behaviors and life perspectives to help alter our culture’s self-destructive course” (p. 7), and how daily advising practices can promote awareness of environmental sustainability efforts. Kay S. Hamada, Assistant Specialist and Academic Advisor at the University of Hawai’i Mānoa, also contributed to JAA’s first issue with an article entitled “A Conceptual Framework for Disruptive Innovation in Advising.” Hamada discusses the various ways in which advancements in technology and other services necessitate changing how advising practices are approached. She terms this innovation as being “disruptive” because it often alters the theories and frameworks that have helped create existing practices.

The Journal of Academic Advising asks important questions about the impact that advisers and advising can have, outside of their traditional roles. JAA is completely open access, providing an audience for the content that may extend beyond the field of advising. The Scholarly Communication Department looks forward to the ideas and perspectives that this journal will bring to the table in further issues.

Office of Scholarly Publishing in the News

This summer, the Office of Scholarly Publishing has been reflecting on the services we provide and the value we bring to IU’s campus and open access scholarly publishing broadly. Simultaneously, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) has been mentioned in several recent articles and news pieces on open access publishing and author rights. I believe that these pieces start to answer our questions about the value, perspective, and expertise that we contribute to the larger community.

Jason Jackson’s post, which discusses Museum Anthropology Review’s business and labor model, highlights the instrumental role library publishers play in the open access ecosystem. Jason states,

I am not able to quantify the financial investments that the IU Libraries have made in MAR via the IUSW program, but the investment is significant and important…. just as MAR tries to serve the field without charging fees for that service, IUSW tries to serve projects like MAR without charging fees for that service. It is certainly the case that economies of scale have been realized by having library-based publishing support services that can concurrently help a wide range of (mostly small) journal projects.

Another recent piece, “What Happened, or, Impasses and Future Horizons for an Open Anthropology of Work” grapples with the challenges of operationalizing open access in the field of anthropology. The editorial cites conversations with the Office of Scholarly Publishing to make an important anthropology title, Anthropology Work Review, open access. While the effort was not successful and we do not currently publish AWR, the piece is important for demonstrating the values that IU’s OSP is dedicated to. Conversations with AWR were also a reflective exercise for our team, as they forced us to reflect on and operationalize our values, which in turn led to a better understanding of our own mission and ethics.

Finally, a recent op ed (first presented as a keynote) discusses the 50th anniversary of the Liberian Studies Association and mentions the association’s journal, the Liberian Studies Journal. The OSP currently hosts the journal’s back issues and is in conversations to help the publication renew publication efforts.

When I think about what OSP is and what we aim to be, I envision a meaningful partnership between IU Press and IU Libraries Scholarly Communication staff that encourages cross-pollination, harnesses disparate publishing resources, and pools expertise strategically in order to transform scholarly publishing at IU by:

  1. Serving IU faculty and students, through journal publishing, open access book publishing, and course material publishing.
  2. Moving conversations on publishing innovations forward on campus and in the larger community. This includes, but isn’t limited to, conversations around experimental peer review, course material affordability, hybrid OA models, open source infrastructure, and new modes of scholarship, including 3D object and multi-media integration.  
  3. Educating the next generation of scholars, both through supporting the creation of student publishing projects and creating programming and hands-on experiences for students interested in publishing, open access, and scholarly career paths.
  4. Moving the national conversation on library publishing, library/press partnerships, and open access forward.

I’m excited to see that we are already making a significant impact in several of these areas, including number four. The pieces above demonstrate that we are both inspiring and contributing to important national conversations that will impact the future of open access publishing.

Summer Project Roundup

Campus may be deserted, but Scholarly Communication is working hard this summer to wrap up projects (and start some new ones) before the fall semester. Here are some of the things we’re looking forward to this summer:

  • Video training modules: Starting with some of our most frequently asked questions, we will be creating short explanatory modules that can be watched individually or linked together to create a training program for a system, concept, or policy.
  • Open Scholarship expansion: Our website, openscholarship.indiana.edu will be undergoing some changes to better reflect the work we are doing and provide some more content for our patrons. You can expect a new and improved workflow for depositing data into IUScholarWorks as well as information on creating and adopting Open Educational Resources.
  • Crossref Cited-by: We are exploring the possibility of participating in the Cited-by service, which would enable authors and readers who use our journal programs to discover who is citing the articles we publish.
  • Journal metrics: This summer we are working on a plan to share journal usage data with editorial teams. We hope to have a plan and template in place by September so that we can launch the service in fall.

If you have questions or would like to propose a project to the Scholarly Communication department, don’t hesitate to reach out by email (iusw@indiana.edu) or tweet us @iulibraries

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Portrayal of Scientists in Children’s Books

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department student assistant Regine Vincent.

Through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and the Indiana University Press, readers everywhere have access to 30+ scholarly  journals and scholarly publications free of charge. One of these journals is The Hoosier Science Teacher.

The Hoosier Science Teacher aims to “provide science educators in Pre-K-12 classrooms, informal education, home schools, and college classrooms with ideas and resources for teaching science…[and publish] content that may help support effective teaching of science and professional development for science educators.” First published in 1975 by The Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc. (HASTI), The Hoosier Science Teacher published regularly in print until 2014. In 2017, publication of the Teacher resumed electronically.  All of the journal’s content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s Managing Editor, Matthew J. Benus, is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the IU Northwest School of Education and a Think Tank & Strategic Consultant for Science & Learning.

Published biannually, the most recent volume of the journal Volume 40 Issue 1 (2018) contains 7 articles covering a variety of topics from lessons and demonstrations and instructional insight to curriculum and learning environments. One of the articles in the current issue is entitled “How Scientists are Portrayed in NSTA Recommends Books” and is authored by Kevin D. Finson and Cecile Arquette of Bradley University and Donna Farland-Smith of The Ohio State University. Finson, Arquette, and Smith argue that while “there was much consistency in how scientists were portrayed in the books across the three years…there were also issues with appropriate numbers of representations of minorities, women, and age of scientists.”

The authors focus on how depictions of scientists in school books affect children’s “perceptions of scientists,” as such perceptions impact students’ “understanding about where scientists work and what they do,” students’ attitudes towards science, as well as students’ success in science learning. While determining exactly how students develop their view of scientists is not easy, they find that media sources have the largest influence or impact. Stereotypes of scientists as older, white males in children’s literature has implications for children that do not identify with these portrayals. Such portrayals can affect students’ “formation of science identity,” which affects “one’s perception that he/she can be a successful investigator in science contexts and is viewed by others as being competent in science.”

Seeing as depictions of scientists in school books have major impacts on students’ interactions with and views of the field of science, tackling the issue of stereotypical depictions is a must. The authors suggest that one way to address this issue is through  “the use of science trade books and picture books in instruction…[teacher-planned] student-centered activities that give [students] opportunities to explore their world and encourage them to think of themselves as scientists.”

The Hoosier Science Teacher’s commitment to open access and immediate availability makes it an immediately accessible and useful resource for teachers. According to Education Week Teacher, educators around the United States spend more than $1 billion dollars a year out-of-pocket on school supplies and resources for their students. This is particularly troubling for schools serving lower-income neighborhoods where, according to NPR, “teachers in high-poverty schools often find themselves digging even deeper into their own pockets.” Access to publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher may help educators to alleviate some of the out-of-pocket costs that they encounter when trying to access needed resources and literature on experimental approaches for their students and their teaching. 

The IU Libraries is committed to diverse collections and perspectives, as the Libraries Diversity Strategic Plan notes that “diversity is… essential to the intellectual vitality of the university.” The Scholarly Communication department shares this commitment and aims to highlight IU’s diversity through our journal publishing program and through supporting publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher.

Frequently Asked Questions About the IUB Open Access Implementation

This FAQ is supplemental to the official Open Access Policy FAQ, available here

What do I need to do to comply with the IUB Open Access Policy?

  • Publish in an open access journal OR
  • Agree to archive an open access version of the article OR
  • Opt out of the policy

What kinds of publications are subject to the policy?

The policy only applies to scholarly journal articles authored by IU Bloomington faculty, published after February 21st, 2017.

I read that I can comply while completing my annual report. How can I do this?

Some faculty might not be able to publish in an OA journal. If that’s the case, you simply need to fill out your DMAI (annual report) as you would every year. We will check to see which version(s) you can create open access and then follow up with you to deposit that version. If you choose, you may opt out in the reporting system by selecting the opt out box for your article.

What will happen in the reporting system if I DO NOT opt out?

The Libraries will run a report in the reporting system that generates a dataset with citation information for articles subject to the open access policy. If a faculty member has not opted out, we will check the publisher’s self archiving policy. If the publishing agreement allows, we will deposit a PDF of the article in IUSW Open and send the faculty member a confirmation email. If the publishing agreement requires another version of the article or does not allow self archiving, we will be in touch by email with next steps.

Image 1: Arrow with workflow of submitting work to the repository

What will happen in the reporting system if I DO opt out?

The Libraries will run a report in the reporting system that generates a dataset with citation information for articles subject to the open access policy. If a faculty member has opted out, we will generate a letter waiving the University’s license to the article. This article will be sent to the author by email.

What about my existing publishing agreements? How will I know if I need to opt out?

If you already know that you need to opt out for an article, you may do so while completing your annual report or using IUSW Open. Otherwise, we will do the rights checking for you and get in touch if you have an incompatible publishing agreement or if we cannot access your publishing agreement.

Do I need to manage all of my publishing contracts, waivers, and potential addenda myself?

Not by yourself. While we do recommend that faculty keep records of documents signed in the publishing process, the Libraries will keep track of the agreements we receive from faculty and publishers.

Can I apply a blanket opt out to all of my articles?

Blanket opt-outs are not possible. The BFC policy states that faculty must opt out for each article subject to the policy. If you wish to opt out for all of your articles, the easiest way to do so is to check the opt out box for the articles as you enter them in DMAI.

What if I make the wrong choice or need to opt out later?

The archival status of an article subject to the policy can be changed at any time and our systems accommodate this. Contact us at iusw@indiana.edu to make the change.

Who can I contact with questions?

You can contact us by email at iusw@indiana.edu or reach out to your liaison librarian. The openscholarship.indiana.edu website will connect you to open access guidance and instructions for depositing in IUSW Open. If you have further questions, the policy FAQ may also be helpful.

 

Open Scholarship for All: Resources for Students, Faculty, and Staff

The IU Libraries support open scholarship for students, faculty, and staff across the Bloomington campus (and on other campuses as well). Read on to learn more about which services are available to you.

Undergraduate students

Graduate Students

  • IUScholarWorks is available as a resource to graduate students who wish to share their research as long as they have authorization from their sponsoring department. Any faculty member in the department can provide authorization.
  • Graduate students who are writing theses and dissertations do not need authorization to deposit in IUScholarWorks. Some units require a copy of graduate student theses and dissertations to be made available in IUScholarWorks. To make your thesis or dissertation available, use this submission form.
  • IU Open Journals support graduate student publications and students are encouraged to contact us if they are interested in starting a journal. Examples of student-managed IU Open Journals publications include:
    • New Views on Gender – research and creative work (poetry, short stories, photography, artwork, etc.) that deals with issues of gender and sexuality
    • Indiana University South Bend Graduate Research Journal – a multidisciplinary journal specifically for graduate students. The goal of the Journal is to publish the best research and/or critical graduate work produced at IU South Bend every year.
  • Research Data Services are available to graduate students at any level who need support planning, organizing, sharing, and publishing research data. For students applying for federal agency funding and required to provide a data management plan (DMP), a DMP review service is available.

Faculty

  • IUScholarWorks is available as a resource to faculty who wish to share their research. Examples of research output faculty share in IUScholarWorks include:
    • Submitted manuscripts (as sent to journals for peer-review)
    • Accepted versions (author’s final peer-reviewed drafts)
    • Published versions (publisher-created files)
    • Supplementary files, including streaming multimedia or datasets of any size
    • Gray literature (conference papers, working drafts, primary evidence)
    • Negative results or work that will not be finished
  • Our CV Service is available to faculty who would like all of the publications on their CV to be systematically deposited into the IUScholarWorks repository.
  • Coming soon, IUScholarWorks Open will be made available to all IU Bloomington faculty publishing work subject to the IU Bloomington Open Access Policy. For more information on the policy, visit our new Open Scholarship site.
  • The Office of Scholarly Publishing Journals provides publishing services to a select group of faculty-run journals at IU Bloomington. Examples include:
  • Research Data Services are available to faculty who need support planning, organizing, sharing, and publishing research data. For faculty applying for federal agency funding and required to provide a data management plan (DMP), a DMP review service is available.

Staff

  • IUScholarWorks is available as a resource to staff who wish to share their research.
  • IU Open Journals support staff publications and staff members are encouraged to contact us if they are interested in starting a journal.
  • Research Data Services are available to staff who need support planning, organizing, sharing, and publishing research data. For staff applying for federal agency funding and required to provide a data management plan (DMP), a DMP review service is available.

Other IU Campuses

 

If you have questions about whether you are eligible for a service or would like to learn more contact us at iusw@indiana.edu

Easily transmit data, video, and large files to IUScholarWorks

If you produce large datasets, create video or images, develop software or custom virtual machines, or rely on large packages of files and data in your research, we are pleased to introduce you to a new wiki-based widget for transmitting your work to our repository team.

Image: Screenshot of IUScholarWorks Box upload area
URL: https://wiki.dlib.indiana.edu/x/swRNHw

With true drag and drop functionality, the widget allows users to transmit files of almost any size, from a 500 MB .mp4 video to a 10+ GB bundled virtual machine. All material dropped on the window or uploaded by browsing to a file on your machine will be synced to a dedicated Box folder owned by the Scholarly Communications Department. From there, our staff can ensure your material is placed in the appropriate preservation environment and mapped correctly to one or more IUScholarWorks records.

The tool gives IU researchers an accessible and straightforward method for transmitting material for deposit. It will be useful for the deposit of big datasets as well as files that merely exceed the 25-50 MB limit imposed on email attachments. Even for those who prefer to self-submit their own datasets, the simplicity of the tool makes the process of pushing data files to the Scholarly Data Archive less demanding. This is especially true if you are dealing with transmitting multiple small files. Compressing and/or packaging them as a zip or tar file will enable a smoother upload.

For any questions about using this tool or to let us know what you’ve uploaded, contact us at iusw @ indiana (dot) edu.

A Recap of Open Access Week 2017

This is the tenth year Open Access Week has been celebrated. Each year, we celebrate a different piece of Open Access and its importance. For 2017, the emphasis was on “Open in Order to…” and the tangible benefits that scholars and institutions reap when research is openly available. The Open Access Week site lists several responses for the “Open in Order to…” prompt including “increase access to knowledge,” “facilitate collaboration,” and “raise your research visibility.”

At IU Libraries, we facilitated and promoted several programs that aligned with this year’s emphasis on the tangible results of OA. Staff from the Scholarly Communication Department, Teaching and Learning, Indiana University Press, the Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities (IDAH), and the Mathers Museum of World Cultures created and led these programs.

The “What Does Google Tell the World About You?” session focused on how openness can impact online presence and increase discoverability.  Our workshop entitled “Predatory Publishers, Open Scholarship, and Your Research” provided an overview of predatory publishing practices and strategies for finding a reputable publisher. “How Does Scholarly Peer-Review for Publication Work? An Introduction for Journals and Books” gave participants a practical, behind-the-scenes look at scholarly peer-review for journals as well as books. Additionally, as an extension of OA week, an info-share and group consultation on the new Open Access Digital Monograph Publishing Program will happen this Tuesday, 10/31. The program supports the publication of open-access monographs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences with a $15,000 subvention.

Finally, Indiana University Press made five IU faculty-authored books published freely available on the IUScholarworks platform from October 20 through October 27. The titles included Dealing with Dictators by Lazlo Borhi, Folk Art and Aging by Jon Kay, Abidjan USA by Daniel Reed, The Accompaniment in “Unaccompanied” Bach by Stanley Ritchie, and Guide to the Solo Horn Repertoire by Richard Seraphinoff.

OA week display case with open press books
The Open Access Week Display Case In Wells Lobby, Featuring some of the IU Press books made openly available 10/20-10/27

The “opening up” of these titles coincided with the annual IU Press Authors Event, which celebrates IUB faculty that have published a monograph in the last year. Authors were congratulated by Dean Walters, Provost Robel, and Vice Provost Van Kooten.

books publishing by IU faculty
A selection of the monographs published by IU faculty in the last year

Our focus for Open Access Week 2017 was to highlight the tangible, practical side of Open Access. Open Access increases impact, provides content to all, and is compatible with reputable and rigorous publishing. Our events this year dispelled common OA myths while highlighting these truths and emphasizing OA’s impact on the IU community specifically.

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Empathetic Classroom

This post was written by the Scholarly Communication Department’s graduate assistant, Jenny Hoops. 

This is our second post in a series that aims to highlight and showcase interesting, integral, and open scholarship at Indiana University. The Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and Indiana University Press, continues to facilitate the creation and preservation of open and accessible scholarship through the Open Journal Systems (OJS) publishing platform. Through OJS, the OSP has helped numerous editorial teams publish over a dozen open access journal titles on a variety of subjects. One of the Office of Scholarly Publishing’s most widely-read titles, Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL), demonstrates the impact that open access research can have.

The Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL) has been dedicated to the publication of research examining contemporary problems, both practical and theoretical, in the teaching of higher education since its first publication in 2001. JoSoTL includes countless articles, essays, critiques, literature reviews, and case studies, authored by scholars around the globe. JoSoTL is indexed by several integral education databases including ERIC, Education Source, and Education Research Complete. All of JoSoTL’s journal content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s editor-in-chief is Michael Morrone, lecturer in IU’s Kelley School of Business and director of the Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET).

One example of the quality of work that JoSoTL publishes is the article “Managing Student Self-Disclosure in Class Settings: Lessons from Feminist Pedagogy,” a piece from this year’s first issue of JoSoTL. The article is authored by IU South Bend’s Catherine Borshuk, a social psychologist and Director of the University’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program. Borshuk engages with a rising issue in higher education classrooms, particularly within the humanities and social sciences: the need to balance empathy with professionalism. The old feminist ideal “the personal is political” has entered the college classroom in unexpected ways, as students, encouraged by patterns developed from social media, feel more willing to share highly personal and occasionally upsetting anecdotes related (or sometimes not) to classroom lectures and topics. Borshuk argues that this impulse to share and create a more understanding classroom must be met with measured compassion, and attempts to foster empathy while still maintaining academic discipline and ethics are key.

After a review of the problem and its theoretical background, Borshuk offers potential solutions for this challenging task. She suggests several initial strategies for teachers engaging with her work: avoiding “othering” students by avoiding assumptions about student backgrounds and experiences and using the pronoun “we” rather than “they” or “them”; building diverse materials and subjects into class readings; and finally, focusing on societal and institutional narratives rather solely the personal (pgs. 80-82). Borshuk concludes with her own experiences of utilizing such techniques and encourages other educators to engage with feminist pedagogy to solve issues of student disclosure. Work such as this article provides philosophical explanations for educational issues while also beginning discussion on how to solve such problems to benefit both the teacher and the student.

The improvement of education relies on communication and collaboration between instructors. Further, in order to develop the best educational techniques, instructors must learn from mistakes and elaborate on successes. The Office of Scholarly Publishing is excited to assist JoSoTL in their work to improve both instruction and education.