Publishing Your Dissertation Open Access

IUScholarWorks is our repository, intended for anyone affiliated with IU to share their research openly so that it’s available for anyone in the world to read. It’s important to remember that this includes graduate students! Graduate students can share papers, data, posters, and even their dissertation in IUScholarWorks.

Sharing a dissertation in IUScholarWorks (sometimes called IUSW) has many benefits for authors, including:

  • increased discoverability of the dissertation, as it will become indexed in Google Scholar
  • long-term preservation, ensuring scholars can access it in several decades and beyond
  • the agency to decide how the dissertation should be licensed. Authors can choose one of several Creative Commons licenses based on how they would like others to use their work (this is optional)
  • the ability to embargo (or limit access) to the dissertation for up to five years
  • a free mechanism for sharing–there is never an additional cost for authors

Sharing Your Dissertation

When a dissertation or thesis has reached its final stage, all graduate students must submit an electronic version of their thesis or dissertation to ProQuest via the Graduate School Website instructions.

ProQuest provides multiple services and options for publishing a dissertation. Traditional publication with ProQuest means that the dissertation will be included in the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. This option is free for the author but in order to access the thesis or dissertation, readers will either need to be affiliated with a library or pay a fee. The 25 most-accessed ProQuest theses and dissertations for last month cost around $38 each to download for those not affiliated with a library or organization with access. However, this model does provide authors with other other add-on services, including the ability to print a physical copy and the option of copyright registration for a $55 fee. 

ProQuest offers an additional option: authors can publish their dissertation or thesis open access in their database PQDT Open for an additional fee, shifting the cost from the reader to the author. Making a dissertation open gives anyone, regardless of affiliation or socioeconomic status the ability to access it. There are a few important considerations for authors interested in this option.  ProQuest charges authors a $95 fee for this option, which might be a challenge for some authors. Additionally, while PQDT Open dissertations are free for all to read, it’s unclear if authors can select a Creative Commons License for their work, which enables authors to explicitly tell others how they can use the dissertation or thesis.

The University of Chicago has a useful summary of the difference between traditional ProQuest dissertation publication, PQDT Open publishing, and publishing in a repository (like IUScholarWorks).

Will making my work open access mean I can’t rework it into an article or book?

Some students worry that publishers will not publish a book or article that is based on a dissertation. First and foremost, you should consult with publishers (or published authors/ mentors) in your field if you have ideas about developing your work further and are concerned about this.

It’s important to remember that when a dissertation goes through the publication process, a lot of the information changes in some shape or form. In other words, it’s unlikely that a dissertation can be republished without major edits.  Dee Mortensen, Senior Sponsoring Editor at the IU Press, compares the relationship between a dissertation and a book to that of a chrysalis and a butterfly.

Because of the substantial alteration involved in the transformation of book to dissertation, it is often not an issue to make the original dissertation available. The study “Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?” supports this claim, finding that most publishers (93% of university presses) do not consider a dissertation a prior publication that would disqualify the revised version from publication.

If you’re still concerned, remember that you can embargo your dissertation for up to five years in IUScholarWorks. An embargo would mean that readers can find information (sometimes called metadata) about your dissertation on the web but they would not be able to read the full-text of the work until a specified date.

IUSW staff are happy to discuss this option with you in more detail if you’re interested. Staff can also consult with authors about Creative Commons licensing and selecting the best license based on your goals for your work.

You can submit your thesis or dissertation  to IUSW here. A staff member will deposit it and respond to you with the link–it’s that simple!

You can also view all of this information in detail in a handy slide deck by our very own Sarah Hare (PDF link). If you are an advisor or faculty member and would like us to come to your class or event to talk to your students about dissertations, please e-mail us at iusw@indiana.edu. 

IU Bloomington Open Access Article Publishing Fund

Are you interested in publishing a manuscript in an open access journal, but concerned about securing funds to pay the article processing charge (APC)? The IU Libraries and Office of the Vice Provost for Research have collaborated to establish a new Open Access Article Publishing Fund for faculty on the IU Bloomington campus. Faculty may apply for up to $2,000 to cover the article processing charges associated with eligible journal articles.

break through publishing barriersFund FAQ

Eligibility

Who is eligible for the Open Access Article Publishing Fund?

IU Bloomington tenured, tenure-eligible, and non-tenure-track faculty, research scientists, research scholars, research center directors, and librarians are eligible.

What kinds of publications are eligible for funding?

Peer-reviewed journal articles in journals that meet the following criteria are eligible:

  • The journal is fully open access (ie, the journal provides immediate, unfettered access to all articles)
  • The journal is either: listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association or adheres to its code of conduct, or a publisher that Indiana University Bloomington believes is taking a sustainable and affordable approach to open access publishing

How do I find out if my journal is eligible?

Contact the Scholarly Communication Department.


Co-authorship

What if I have non-IU Bloomington co-authors on the manuscript?

In the case of an article with multiple non-IU co-authors, each author is responsible for a prorated portion of any publishing fees. For example, for an article with three authors that is to appear in a journal with a $3,000 publication fee, each author is responsible for $1,000 of that fee.

What if I have IU Bloomington faculty co-authors on the manuscript?

In the case of an article with multiple IU Bloomington authors, each author is responsible for a prorated portion of any publishing fees. For example, for an article with two authors that is to appear in a journal with a $2,000 publication fee, each IU Bloomington author may apply for up to $1,000

What if I have IUPUI co-authors on the manuscript?

IUPUI has its own IUPUI Open Access Fund. Applicants with IU Bloomington/ IUPUI co-authored manuscripts are encouraged to contact the Scholarly Communication Department to coordinate joint applications.

What if I have student co-authors on the manuscript?

The fund will not count student authors when splitting APC responsibility among co-authors. For example, in the case of a manuscript with one IU Bloomington faculty author, one IU Bloomington graduate student, and one non-IU Bloomington faculty author with an APC of $2,000, each faculty author would be responsible for 50% of the APC, and the IU Bloomington faculty author could apply for up to $1,000 in funding to cover the cost of 50% of the APC.


Payment

If my application is accepted, how will the APC be paid?

The Open Access Article Publishing Fund will pay publisher invoices directly – reimbursement is not possible and authors with approved applications will not pay for APCs from personal or research funds. More details will be sent upon approval.

Are there strings attached?

We do ask that all fund recipients deposit their published article in our institutional repository and complete a brief survey, but there are no additional requirements.


Application

How do I apply for the fund?

To read more about the fund and to apply, visit the OVPR internal funding opportunity page here: https://research.iu.edu/funding-proposals/funding/opportunities/open-access-journal-fund/index.html

Who can I contact with questions?

Questions may be directed to the IU Libraries (iusw @ indiana.edu ) or the OVPR (ovprgrnt @ indiana.edu).

Jenny Hoops: Our New Open Access Publishing Manager

We’re very excited to share that Jenny Hoops will begin as the department’s new Open Access Publishing Manager on January 7, 2019. In this role, Jenny will provide user support for the department’s journal program and institutional repository. Jenny will also oversee the creation of documentation to support users and contribute feature requests to our development team in order to improve systems and workflows. Jenny will take over for Richard Higgins, who previously served as Open Access Publishing Manager. He joined the Library Technologies Unit in October 2018 as a Programmer/Analyst and continues to work closely with the department.

photo of jenny hoops

Previously, Jenny served as Digital Publishing Assistant in the Scholarly Communication Department, collaborating with SC staff to lead and assess several projects. Jenny is currently completing her Library Science degree. Her research interests include open publishing trends and digital accessibility/literacy. Before coming to IU, she completed a bachelor’s degree in history and gender/sexuality studies at Grinnell College. 

Please join me in welcoming Jenny to the Libraries!

cOAlition S: The Future of Research

On September 4th of this year, Open Access advocates and scientists around the world woke up to some big news: eleven European national research agencies, the European Commission, and the European Research Council (which represents all the national scientific organizations of European Union member states) announced that they were launching cOAlition S which will require all research funded by these organizations to be fully Open Access by January 1st 2020.

This is a major coup for Open Access activists and a step in the right direction for worldwide scientific research. Not only will cutting-edge and high quality research papers be easy and free for anyone to access, but this will also help to kick-start innovation among open access publications  and encourage more institutions, funders and scientists to be deliberate in choosing an Open Access journals and platforms for their research.

Along with this requirement, the cOAlition S announced ten guiding principles in their Plan S, which I will break down below:

Copyright:

•  Authors retain copyright of their publications without restrictions. All publications must be published under an open license, preferably the Creative Commons Attribution Licence CC BY. In all cases, the license applied should fulfill the requirements defined by the Berlin Declaration;

Perhaps  one of the most important guiding principles of Open Access, Plan S recognizes that authors should a) retain copyright to their work, b) get credit for the work they do, and c) enable anyone to share, adapt, remix, and build upon their work. You can also read more about CC-BY in this fantastic post by the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association.

Funding and Organization

•  The Funders will ensure jointly the establishment of robust criteria and requirements for the services that compliant high quality Open Access journals and Open Access platforms must provide
•  In case such high quality Open Access journals or platforms do not yet exist, the Funders will, in a coordinated way, provide incentives to establish and support them when appropriate; support will also be provided for Open Access infrastructures where necessary;
•  The ‘hybrid’ model of publishing is not compliant with the above principles;

These three points are absolutely crucial to understanding–the Funders are clearly spelling out their support for establishing platforms, services, journals, and incentives for the publication of scientific research. They are also saying that even if these routes of publication do not yet exist that they will support them. What this means is that we may begin to see increasing academic, financial and intellectual support behind OA platforms, journals and monographs. Finally, they are taking the stance that hybrid models are not compliant with their principals, and that they will support increasing openness. A hybrid model is, for example, when a journal will allow authors to make their article open access–but only for a fee. cOAlition S is taking steps to do away with this hybrid model.

Institutional Support

•  Where applicable, Open Access publication fees are covered by the Funders or universities, not by individual researchers; it is acknowledged that all scientists should be able to publish their work •  Open Access even if their institutions have limited means;
When Open Access publication fees are applied, their funding is standardised and capped (across Europe);
•  The Funders will ask universities, research organisations, and libraries to align their policies and strategies, notably to ensure transparency;
•  The importance of open archives and repositories for hosting research outputs is acknowledged because of their long-term archiving function and their potential for editorial innovation;

These four bullet points show that the Funders are bringing real heavyweight institutional support to the forefront of the agenda. The first point especially, that the Funders or author universities will cover the cost of publication fees is momentous for researchers. As covered in great detail by Nature and Paywall: The Movie, the fees charged to authors who want to make their articles Open Access can be burdensome. Additionally, the policy of standardizing Open Access fees will help to bring down costs across disciplines in Europe.

It is notable that cOAlition S gives high praise to archives, libraries and repositories. As demonstrated by our own experience at IU, institutional repositories like IU ScholarWorks and IU Scholarworks Open are great ways to distribute Open Access research as they allow access by an international community of learners to research and information.

The Plan S goal is that all journal and other non-book scholarly work should be Open Access by 1 January 2020–and they that they will monitor compliance and sanction non-compliance. You can read more about cOAlition S, the member organizations, and their plans here.

Plan S is an exciting Open Access breakthrough that promises a more accessible and transparent future for research.

Journal of Academic Advising Publishes Inaugural Issue

The Scholarly Communication department is excited to share that the Journal of Academic Advising (JAA), a recently launched open access publication, has published its first issue. This journal focuses on fostering interdisciplinary communication and collaboration between academic advising professionals through the publishing of research relating to different aspects of advising. The publication of the first issue coincides with NACADA’s annual national conference for academic advisors, where JAA editorial staff will participate in two special sessions: “Expanding Scholarship in Advising Through a New Journal” and “So You Want to be a Scholar: Fostering a Research Environment.”

Cover of Journal of Academic Advising's first issue

 

JAA’s inaugural issue focuses on sustainability and innovation in academic advising, a theme that is highlighted in Cheryl Wanko’s “Advising for Sustainability: A Challenge.” Wanko, an English professor and the chair of the Committee for Advising Excellence at West Chester University, asks how universities and advising can “cultivate more sustainable behaviors and life perspectives to help alter our culture’s self-destructive course” (p. 7), and how daily advising practices can promote awareness of environmental sustainability efforts. Kay S. Hamada, Assistant Specialist and Academic Advisor at the University of Hawai’i Mānoa, also contributed to JAA’s first issue with an article entitled “A Conceptual Framework for Disruptive Innovation in Advising.” Hamada discusses the various ways in which advancements in technology and other services necessitate changing how advising practices are approached. She terms this innovation as being “disruptive” because it often alters the theories and frameworks that have helped create existing practices.

The Journal of Academic Advising asks important questions about the impact that advisers and advising can have, outside of their traditional roles. JAA is completely open access, providing an audience for the content that may extend beyond the field of advising. The Scholarly Communication Department looks forward to the ideas and perspectives that this journal will bring to the table in further issues.

Office of Scholarly Publishing in the News

This summer, the Office of Scholarly Publishing has been reflecting on the services we provide and the value we bring to IU’s campus and open access scholarly publishing broadly. Simultaneously, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) has been mentioned in several recent articles and news pieces on open access publishing and author rights. I believe that these pieces start to answer our questions about the value, perspective, and expertise that we contribute to the larger community.

Jason Jackson’s post, which discusses Museum Anthropology Review’s business and labor model, highlights the instrumental role library publishers play in the open access ecosystem. Jason states,

I am not able to quantify the financial investments that the IU Libraries have made in MAR via the IUSW program, but the investment is significant and important…. just as MAR tries to serve the field without charging fees for that service, IUSW tries to serve projects like MAR without charging fees for that service. It is certainly the case that economies of scale have been realized by having library-based publishing support services that can concurrently help a wide range of (mostly small) journal projects.

Another recent piece, “What Happened, or, Impasses and Future Horizons for an Open Anthropology of Work” grapples with the challenges of operationalizing open access in the field of anthropology. The editorial cites conversations with the Office of Scholarly Publishing to make an important anthropology title, Anthropology Work Review, open access. While the effort was not successful and we do not currently publish AWR, the piece is important for demonstrating the values that IU’s OSP is dedicated to. Conversations with AWR were also a reflective exercise for our team, as they forced us to reflect on and operationalize our values, which in turn led to a better understanding of our own mission and ethics.

Finally, a recent op ed (first presented as a keynote) discusses the 50th anniversary of the Liberian Studies Association and mentions the association’s journal, the Liberian Studies Journal. The OSP currently hosts the journal’s back issues and is in conversations to help the publication renew publication efforts.

When I think about what OSP is and what we aim to be, I envision a meaningful partnership between IU Press and IU Libraries Scholarly Communication staff that encourages cross-pollination, harnesses disparate publishing resources, and pools expertise strategically in order to transform scholarly publishing at IU by:

  1. Serving IU faculty and students, through journal publishing, open access book publishing, and course material publishing.
  2. Moving conversations on publishing innovations forward on campus and in the larger community. This includes, but isn’t limited to, conversations around experimental peer review, course material affordability, hybrid OA models, open source infrastructure, and new modes of scholarship, including 3D object and multi-media integration.  
  3. Educating the next generation of scholars, both through supporting the creation of student publishing projects and creating programming and hands-on experiences for students interested in publishing, open access, and scholarly career paths.
  4. Moving the national conversation on library publishing, library/press partnerships, and open access forward.

I’m excited to see that we are already making a significant impact in several of these areas, including number four. The pieces above demonstrate that we are both inspiring and contributing to important national conversations that will impact the future of open access publishing.

Summer Project Roundup

Campus may be deserted, but Scholarly Communication is working hard this summer to wrap up projects (and start some new ones) before the fall semester. Here are some of the things we’re looking forward to this summer:

  • Video training modules: Starting with some of our most frequently asked questions, we will be creating short explanatory modules that can be watched individually or linked together to create a training program for a system, concept, or policy.
  • Open Scholarship expansion: Our website, openscholarship.indiana.edu will be undergoing some changes to better reflect the work we are doing and provide some more content for our patrons. You can expect a new and improved workflow for depositing data into IUScholarWorks as well as information on creating and adopting Open Educational Resources.
  • Crossref Cited-by: We are exploring the possibility of participating in the Cited-by service, which would enable authors and readers who use our journal programs to discover who is citing the articles we publish.
  • Journal metrics: This summer we are working on a plan to share journal usage data with editorial teams. We hope to have a plan and template in place by September so that we can launch the service in fall.

If you have questions or would like to propose a project to the Scholarly Communication department, don’t hesitate to reach out by email (iusw@indiana.edu) or tweet us @iulibraries

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Portrayal of Scientists in Children’s Books

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department student assistant Regine Vincent.

Through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and the Indiana University Press, readers everywhere have access to 30+ scholarly  journals and scholarly publications free of charge. One of these journals is The Hoosier Science Teacher.

The Hoosier Science Teacher aims to “provide science educators in Pre-K-12 classrooms, informal education, home schools, and college classrooms with ideas and resources for teaching science…[and publish] content that may help support effective teaching of science and professional development for science educators.” First published in 1975 by The Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc. (HASTI), The Hoosier Science Teacher published regularly in print until 2014. In 2017, publication of the Teacher resumed electronically.  All of the journal’s content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s Managing Editor, Matthew J. Benus, is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the IU Northwest School of Education and a Think Tank & Strategic Consultant for Science & Learning.

Published biannually, the most recent volume of the journal Volume 40 Issue 1 (2018) contains 7 articles covering a variety of topics from lessons and demonstrations and instructional insight to curriculum and learning environments. One of the articles in the current issue is entitled “How Scientists are Portrayed in NSTA Recommends Books” and is authored by Kevin D. Finson and Cecile Arquette of Bradley University and Donna Farland-Smith of The Ohio State University. Finson, Arquette, and Smith argue that while “there was much consistency in how scientists were portrayed in the books across the three years…there were also issues with appropriate numbers of representations of minorities, women, and age of scientists.”

The authors focus on how depictions of scientists in school books affect children’s “perceptions of scientists,” as such perceptions impact students’ “understanding about where scientists work and what they do,” students’ attitudes towards science, as well as students’ success in science learning. While determining exactly how students develop their view of scientists is not easy, they find that media sources have the largest influence or impact. Stereotypes of scientists as older, white males in children’s literature has implications for children that do not identify with these portrayals. Such portrayals can affect students’ “formation of science identity,” which affects “one’s perception that he/she can be a successful investigator in science contexts and is viewed by others as being competent in science.”

Seeing as depictions of scientists in school books have major impacts on students’ interactions with and views of the field of science, tackling the issue of stereotypical depictions is a must. The authors suggest that one way to address this issue is through  “the use of science trade books and picture books in instruction…[teacher-planned] student-centered activities that give [students] opportunities to explore their world and encourage them to think of themselves as scientists.”

The Hoosier Science Teacher’s commitment to open access and immediate availability makes it an immediately accessible and useful resource for teachers. According to Education Week Teacher, educators around the United States spend more than $1 billion dollars a year out-of-pocket on school supplies and resources for their students. This is particularly troubling for schools serving lower-income neighborhoods where, according to NPR, “teachers in high-poverty schools often find themselves digging even deeper into their own pockets.” Access to publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher may help educators to alleviate some of the out-of-pocket costs that they encounter when trying to access needed resources and literature on experimental approaches for their students and their teaching. 

The IU Libraries is committed to diverse collections and perspectives, as the Libraries Diversity Strategic Plan notes that “diversity is… essential to the intellectual vitality of the university.” The Scholarly Communication department shares this commitment and aims to highlight IU’s diversity through our journal publishing program and through supporting publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher.

Frequently Asked Questions About the IUB Open Access Implementation

This FAQ is supplemental to the official Open Access Policy FAQ, available here

What do I need to do to comply with the IUB Open Access Policy?

  • Publish in an open access journal OR
  • Agree to archive an open access version of the article OR
  • Opt out of the policy

What kinds of publications are subject to the policy?

The policy only applies to scholarly journal articles authored by IU Bloomington faculty, published after February 21st, 2017.

I read that I can comply while completing my annual report. How can I do this?

Some faculty might not be able to publish in an OA journal. If that’s the case, you simply need to fill out your DMAI (annual report) as you would every year. We will check to see which version(s) you can create open access and then follow up with you to deposit that version. If you choose, you may opt out in the reporting system by selecting the opt out box for your article.

What will happen in the reporting system if I DO NOT opt out?

The Libraries will run a report in the reporting system that generates a dataset with citation information for articles subject to the open access policy. If a faculty member has not opted out, we will check the publisher’s self archiving policy. If the publishing agreement allows, we will deposit a PDF of the article in IUSW Open and send the faculty member a confirmation email. If the publishing agreement requires another version of the article or does not allow self archiving, we will be in touch by email with next steps.

Image 1: Arrow with workflow of submitting work to the repository

What will happen in the reporting system if I DO opt out?

The Libraries will run a report in the reporting system that generates a dataset with citation information for articles subject to the open access policy. If a faculty member has opted out, we will generate a letter waiving the University’s license to the article. This article will be sent to the author by email.

What about my existing publishing agreements? How will I know if I need to opt out?

If you already know that you need to opt out for an article, you may do so while completing your annual report or using IUSW Open. Otherwise, we will do the rights checking for you and get in touch if you have an incompatible publishing agreement or if we cannot access your publishing agreement.

Do I need to manage all of my publishing contracts, waivers, and potential addenda myself?

Not by yourself. While we do recommend that faculty keep records of documents signed in the publishing process, the Libraries will keep track of the agreements we receive from faculty and publishers.

Can I apply a blanket opt out to all of my articles?

Blanket opt-outs are not possible. The BFC policy states that faculty must opt out for each article subject to the policy. If you wish to opt out for all of your articles, the easiest way to do so is to check the opt out box for the articles as you enter them in DMAI.

What if I make the wrong choice or need to opt out later?

The archival status of an article subject to the policy can be changed at any time and our systems accommodate this. Contact us at iusw@indiana.edu to make the change.

Who can I contact with questions?

You can contact us by email at iusw@indiana.edu or reach out to your liaison librarian. The openscholarship.indiana.edu website will connect you to open access guidance and instructions for depositing in IUSW Open. If you have further questions, the policy FAQ may also be helpful.

 

Open Scholarship for All: Resources for Students, Faculty, and Staff

The IU Libraries support open scholarship for students, faculty, and staff across the Bloomington campus (and on other campuses as well). Read on to learn more about which services are available to you.

Undergraduate students

Graduate Students

  • IUScholarWorks is available as a resource to graduate students who wish to share their research as long as they have authorization from their sponsoring department. Any faculty member in the department can provide authorization.
  • Graduate students who are writing theses and dissertations do not need authorization to deposit in IUScholarWorks. Some units require a copy of graduate student theses and dissertations to be made available in IUScholarWorks. To make your thesis or dissertation available, use this submission form.
  • IU Open Journals support graduate student publications and students are encouraged to contact us if they are interested in starting a journal. Examples of student-managed IU Open Journals publications include:
    • New Views on Gender – research and creative work (poetry, short stories, photography, artwork, etc.) that deals with issues of gender and sexuality
    • Indiana University South Bend Graduate Research Journal – a multidisciplinary journal specifically for graduate students. The goal of the Journal is to publish the best research and/or critical graduate work produced at IU South Bend every year.
  • Research Data Services are available to graduate students at any level who need support planning, organizing, sharing, and publishing research data. For students applying for federal agency funding and required to provide a data management plan (DMP), a DMP review service is available.

Faculty

  • IUScholarWorks is available as a resource to faculty who wish to share their research. Examples of research output faculty share in IUScholarWorks include:
    • Submitted manuscripts (as sent to journals for peer-review)
    • Accepted versions (author’s final peer-reviewed drafts)
    • Published versions (publisher-created files)
    • Supplementary files, including streaming multimedia or datasets of any size
    • Gray literature (conference papers, working drafts, primary evidence)
    • Negative results or work that will not be finished
  • Our CV Service is available to faculty who would like all of the publications on their CV to be systematically deposited into the IUScholarWorks repository.
  • Coming soon, IUScholarWorks Open will be made available to all IU Bloomington faculty publishing work subject to the IU Bloomington Open Access Policy. For more information on the policy, visit our new Open Scholarship site.
  • The Office of Scholarly Publishing Journals provides publishing services to a select group of faculty-run journals at IU Bloomington. Examples include:
  • Research Data Services are available to faculty who need support planning, organizing, sharing, and publishing research data. For faculty applying for federal agency funding and required to provide a data management plan (DMP), a DMP review service is available.

Staff

  • IUScholarWorks is available as a resource to staff who wish to share their research.
  • IU Open Journals support staff publications and staff members are encouraged to contact us if they are interested in starting a journal.
  • Research Data Services are available to staff who need support planning, organizing, sharing, and publishing research data. For staff applying for federal agency funding and required to provide a data management plan (DMP), a DMP review service is available.

Other IU Campuses

 

If you have questions about whether you are eligible for a service or would like to learn more contact us at iusw@indiana.edu