Leveraging the License: Part I

The Scholarly Communication Department attended several orientations and events for new faculty over the last few weeks. During these events, I have had the privilege of chatting informally with a faculty members about IU Bloomington’s new Open Access Policy. Faculty have a lot of questions about how the policy works, what kinds of scholarship the policy applies to, and author processing charges (or APCs).

The question that has been most difficult to explain quickly and effectively in these informal conversations has been about how faculty can “leverage” or utilize the license established by the Open Access policy when negotiating with potential publishers. This post will explain in more detail what “leveraging the license” means and clarify when in the publishing process faculty should attempt to negotiate. This post on leveraging the OA policy license is part one of a two-part series. The second post will explore the OA policy license in more detail, particularly when it concerns utilizing third-party content.

Our new Open Scholarship website includes a detailed FAQ that answers common questions faculty have about the OA policy. One of the questions listed is, “Will I have to negotiate my copyright transfer with my journal publishers?” Our answer is no. The policy maintains faculty agency and empowers them to make the best decision for their research. Faculty can always embargo their article to comply with their selected journal’s policies or opt out of the OA policy for a specific article.

However, we note that in many cases, it is in the faculty member’s best interest to negotiate. Moreover, the license that IUB OA Policy establishes can support faculty efforts to retain their copyright. Under the question about negotiating copyright transfers we state, “The policy operates automatically to give IUScholarWorks a license in any scholarly articles faculty members complete after its adoption… communicate this policy to your publisher and add to any copyright license (or assignment for scholarly articles) an addendum stating that the agreement is subject to this prior license. That way, you will avoid agreeing to give the publisher rights that are inconsistent with the prior license to IUScholarWorks that permits open-access distribution.”

What does this mean in practice? How do you begin to start a conversation with a publisher that has a restrictive publishing agreement? When should you mention the IUB OA Policy and subsequent license? We have created a flowchart to answer these questions:

Open access policy workflow

Flowchart created by Jamie Wittenberg

After your manuscript is complete, you should identify a journal that offers the readership and audience that you are most interested in. If this is an open access journal, once your article is accepted and published you have complied with the OA policy! If this is a closed journal, you will need to determine if your publishing agreement allows self-archiving (or posting an open version of your article in a repository). The Scholarly Communication department is always happy to help faculty review their publishing agreements. If the publishing agreement allows you to share a version of your work, preferably the publisher’s final version (after peer review with typesetting), then you will submit that version to the institutional repository. Archiving the author’s final manuscript will nevertheless meet the OA policy’s requirement. If the journal does not allow self-archiving, it’s time to consider negotiating.

Negotiating with a publisher is both personal and contextual. Your decision to negotiate may be impacted by your level of comfort, goals, co-authors, and the importance of the publication venue. Is this the only venue that makes sense for your article? Does this journal have impressive metrics or important readership? Or are there other publication venues that might accept the article? Is it non-negotiable to you that others have access to your article, regardless of library affiliation or socio-economic status? Asking these questions can help you decide if publisher negotiation is in your best interest. In general, many publishers are familiar with open access policies so starting a conversation about the publishing agreement is not harmful and can help clarify how or if you should continue to negotiate.

After you have reviewed the publishing agreement and you’ve decided that you would like to negotiate, you can contact our Copyright Program Librarian and lawyer, Naz Pantaloni, for guidance. In addition to having expertise in copyright, Naz has worked with several scholars to retain their author rights and is familiar with strategies for negotiating with publishers. Naz will either assist you with preparing an addendum to present to the journal or help you construct a response that includes information about the IUB Open Access policy. One addendum template that Naz might help you utilize comes from the Big 10 Academic Alliance (formerly CIC). An example of a response to a publisher in order to start the negotiation process is found on our Open Scholarship Q&A:

“[Journal] acknowledges that [Author] retains the right to provide a copy of the final manuscript, upon acceptance for [Journal] publication or thereafter, for compliance with the Indiana University Open Access Policy and for public archiving in IUScholarWorks as soon as possible after publication by [Journal].”

If you cannot come to an understanding with your publisher and need to sign over the exclusive rights to your work, you must complete the opt out process.

In a previous post, I wrote about the spectrum of openness that exists and the Scholarly Communication Department’s goal of supporting all manifestations of open. It is worth stating that the IUB Open Access policy is about making content open and available to readers everywhere. But it is also true the OA policy is about author rights. When authors retain their rights, including the right to reproduce, distribute, display, and make derivative works of their scholarship, they retain the life of their work. I have consulted with many faculty members (and graduate students) that need to interlibrary loan their own work because they don’t have access to it. I’ve worked with numerous faculty that wish they would have retained at least some of their rights so that they could make their work available to their students or share it more broadly. In addition to resources like our copyright program and publishing resources, the OA policy provides a mechanism for faculty to find their seat at the negotiation table. I’m excited for what this means for the research profile of IU Bloomington.

Statistical Somethings from IUScholarWorks: A Performer’s Guide to the Saxophone Music of Bernhard Heiden by Thomas Walsh

This post was written by the Scholarly Communication Department summer graduate assistant, Ruthann E. Miller  

This post is the first in a series that aims to highlight and showcase interesting, integral, and open scholarship in the IUScholarWorks repository. IUScholarWorks currently contains more than 8,000 unique items submitted by scholars, students, and professionals from a variety of disciplines. With all of this content, what interests readers the most?

The repository offers a section on statistics that conveniently provide the top 10 most viewed items. These results have a surprising nugget nestled away in the number 5 spot. It is a dissertation entitled, A Performer’s Guide to the Saxophone Music of Bernhard Heiden. The dissertation was written in 1999 by Thomas Walsh and later deposited into the repository in 2006. The dissertation is shared under a Creative Commons license, which is not uncommon for items authored by scholars from the Jacobs School of Music. A Creative Commons license (CC) comes in different varieties, but they all allow the author of a work to decide to allow others to freely distribute, share, and build upon their material while still retaining ownership. This particular dissertation is licensed under a CC BY-NC-ND 2.5, which means the author allows anyone to copy and redistribute the work in any medium or format. However, the author does not allow the dissertation to be used for commercial purposes and it is not permissible to alter the work. The dissertation earned the fifth position with 7,644 views. To put this into perspective, number four on the list has 8,372 and number six has 6,714.

This particular item is important for a number of reasons. First, it is a dissertation. Dissertations are arguably one of the most important steps in a scholar’s early career. They also tend to fill gaps in the literature and explore foundational disciplinary concepts or trends in greater detail. This particular dissertation is incredibly popular, as denoted by its place in the top five. Of the top five items, one is an article on why the drinking age should be lowered, two are technical reports from IU’s scientific community, and one is a journal article on education. There are no other dissertations in the top five items. Not only did a dissertation crack the top five, but it is also the only one in the top ten!

The focus Thomas Walsh applies to the work of Bernard Heiden is fascinating. Walsh spends time providing a biographical sketch of Heiden as well as historical background on Heiden’s pieces that include saxophone. Much of the personal information included in the dissertation was obtained from several interviews Walsh conducted with Heiden. His final interview was in May 1999 and, unfortunately, Heiden passed away in April 2000. Heiden had a close connection with the Jacobs School of Music and was the chair of the composition department until retiring in 1974.

A Performer’s Guide to the Saxophone Music of Bernhard Heiden by Thomas Walsh also showcases the importance of making research open access. As most graduate students in the humanities can confirm, it is notoriously difficult to access dissertations, especially older ones or works connected to universities that have not promoted open access to their graduate students and faculty. Due to this, there is often information that does not find its way into new research simply due to information barriers. IU’s repository, however, provides access to a broad range of items that were formerly out of reach, including dissertations. Now, the research and efforts of newly minted scholars can be attained and used to the fullest potential. By making materials openly available, IUScholarWorks facilitates the use of  the information contained within dissertations to reach new audiences and promote the spread of ideas. This dissertation is just one example of how much impact open access can have on the world of academia.

What item(s) in IUScholarWorks do you view most? How are they unique?

To view the complete list of the highest viewed items in IUScholarWorks, visit our statistics page.

 

New Resource to Support Open Scholarship

The Scholarly Communication Department recently launched a new Open Scholarship website. The site serves as a central hub for researchers interested in open access, open data, and/or open publishing. The site is particularly useful for finding information about how faculty can comply with the recently-approved IUB Open Access Policy. The Open Access Policy will provide a mechanism for faculty to assert their rights as authors, enabling them to share their scholarship more widely and increasing readership and engagement of IU-faculty work.

The launch of our open scholarship site begs the question, “what is open scholarship?” More pointedly, what qualifies as “scholarship” and how “open” does that output need to be? We think that our site presents a definite answer. We believe that the term scholarship should be inclusive of all of the ways that scholars communicate: through journal articles and books but also through sharing their research data, making visible their learning objects and teaching materials, and even creating new and innovative publications to fill a distinct gap in a body of literature. The new site illustrates that we as the Scholarly Communication Department support scholarship in all of its modes and formats, formal and informal.

Similarly, while open is a core value and essential principle of our work, we recognize that there is an entire spectrum of openness. The Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) and the Public Library of Science (PLoS) recently collaboratively authored a “How Open Is It?” spectrum, which helps illustrate this point.

They break open down to reader rights, reuse rights, copyrights, author posting rights, automatic posting, and machine readability. For each, they note the spectrum of open to closed that can exist, which illustrates just how complex and contextual open is. For example, there might be an “open” article that is accessible to readers, but the author wasn’t able to retain all rights to the article and it isn’t in a format that is machine readable. Or, alternatively, an author might retain their copyright and make their work their open but only with strict and limited reuse permissions. The Scholarly Communication Department’s goal is to support all manifestations of openness, regardless of where researchers fall on this spectrum.

Our new website showcases the many services and resources our department offers to facilitate open scholarship. In addition to managing IUScholarWorks and providing faculty a space to make their work open, we provide one-on-one consultations to researchers interested in a variety of topics including advocating for their author rights, evaluating their impact, crafting a data management plan, or starting or making open a journal. We work collaboratively with other library and campus units, including the Indiana University Press, Digital Collections Services, and UITS, to assist researchers with digital scholarship, publishing ventures, and data storage. We look forward to continuing to enhance and develop our suite of services to better support the IU research community.

We’re interested in your feedback! Please send questions and comments about the new Open Scholarship website to iusw@indiana.edu

The Scholarly Communication Department would like to thank the Discovery and User Experience Department, specifically Matt Fitzwater and Courtney McDonald, for their assistance and expertise throughout the development of this site.

Open Access policy adopted by IU Bloomington faculty

The Bloomington Faculty Council unanimously approved an Open Access policy today that ensures that faculty scholarship will be accessible and available to the public for future generations. Open Access means that scholarly articles are regarded as the fruits of research that authors give to the world for the sake of inquiry and knowledge without expectation of payment. Adopting such a policy reduces barriers to research and learning by making research available on the public internet to be downloaded and shared freely, making it possible for scholarship to be more widely read and cited than literature that appears in closed-access, licensed journal databases. The policy can be found at IUB’s VPFAA site and an FAQ has been posted to our website.

The Scholarly Communication staff will be available to help authors deposit their work — usually the final version of an article that has gone through peer review — in IUScholarWorks or another repository for archival purposes. Indeed, as Nazareth Pantaloni, Copyright Librarian for the IU LIbraries, observed: “The Indiana University Libraries are delighted that the Bloomington Faculty Council has joined the over 300 U.S. colleges and universities who have decided to make their faculty’s scholarship more freely available under an Open Access policy. We look forward to working with them to accomplish that goal.” Faculty members may also contact us to opt-out of the policy, a process that will be incorporated into a one-click form once the policy is fully implemented.

The policy adopted today is only the latest step in an ongoing process at IU Bloomington. The BFC adopted one of the first Open Access policies in the country in March of 2004. That policy was actually a resolution in which the BFC decried the rising costs of academic journals and databases — at the time, 70% of a $9.2 million annual budget — and called on the IU Libraries to adopt several strategies in response, including, among other things, “to promote open scholarly communication.” That resolution served as an impetus for the Libraries’ development of IUScholarWorks. Today, IU ScholarWorks hosts nearly 30 Open Access journals, primarily in the humanities and social sciences, and serves as the repository for nearly 8,000 items deposited by IU Bloomington faculty, students, and staff, including data sets, conference proceedings, out-of-print books recovered by faculty from their original publishers, doctoral dissertations from the Jacobs School of Music, Patten Lectures, and a wide array of journal articles, research reports, other scholarly literature, and even creative works of authorship. Current developments include improvements in the repository’s ability to host multimedia content and data.

Open Access policies are intended, in part, to provide an institutional mechanism for faculty authors to assert the retention of at least the minimum rights necessary in order not only to cooperate with their institutional OA policy, but also be able to reuse their work in other ways that could be beneficial to them, such as distributing their work via their own professional website, through social media, or simply to students in their classes.

Resources are available for faculty who are interested in learning more about the impact and implementation of the policy. Please direct questions to iusw@indiana.edu.

Image: CC-BY. Flickr user Open Access Button

How open science helps researchers succeed

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A new peer-reviewed, sweeping assessment of the impact of open science discovers a number of heartening trends and outcomes in open access approaches to research scholarship. The authors look carefully at the past decade of published research on the impact of open access policies and “find significant benefits to researchers relative to more traditional closed practices.”

 

As they write in summary,

The evidence that openly sharing articles, code, and data is beneficial for researchers is strong and building. Each year, more studies are published showing the open citation advantage; more funders announce policies encouraging, mandating, or specifically financing open research; and more employers are recognizing open practices in academic evaluations. In addition, a growing number of tools are making the process of sharing research outputs easier, faster, and more cost-effective. In his 2012 book Open Access, Peter Suber summed it up best: “[OA] increases a work’s visibility, retrievability, audience, usage, and citations, which all convert to career building. For publishing scholars, it would be a bargain even if it were costly, difficult, and time-consuming. But…it’s not costly, not difficult, and not time-consuming.” (Suber, 2012)

McKiernan et al. “How open science helps researchers succeed.” eLife 2016;5:e16800. DOI: 10.7554/eLife.16800 

The article’s bibliography of past studies is alone worth a look. The full article is available in full text form at elifesciences.org by clicking on the DOI in the article citation above.

Introducing Office of Scholarly Publishing Journals

IUScholarWorks journalsThe way Open Access journals publishing is done on campus is about to become even more rewarding—and exciting. Select OA journals based at Indiana University will have the option of benefitting from enhanced publishing services through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP). The OSP was established by Indiana University Provost Lauren Robel in 2012 as a single-service campus publishing resource that draws upon the expertise and capabilities of IU Libraries and IU Press. Since 2009, the IU Libraries have facilitated the publishing of open access journals with the IUScholarWorks journals service. Among other services, the Libraries have provided technical support, performed platform maintenance and upgrades, and migrated content into the Public Knowledge Project’s Open Journal Systems platform at no charge.

Now, through the Office of Scholarly Publishing, those services can expand, still at no charge, for those campus OA journals whose operations are consistent with professionally-published scholarly journals. Drawing upon IU Press expertise in production, copyediting, indexing, and marketing, the OA journals selected will have the option of receiving an array of expanded publishing services. These include worldwide promotion alongside IU Press scholarly journals; copyediting, design, and layout; indexing; print-on-demand and fulfillment; e-reader editions; and additional revenue through print and online advertising sales. Representatives from IU Libraries and IU Press have begun meeting with journal editors to determine how the expanded services of the Office of Scholarly Publishing would be able to help support their particular areas of need.

This expanded-service journals program is the first phase of the rollout of the Office of Scholarly Publishing’s comprehensive suite of publishing services for the IU community. In the coming months, those services will continue to grow, including the development of new websites from IU Press and the OSP that will contain robust, interactive author interfaces as well as a host of vital information and publishing options for campus authors and editors.

For more information, contact:

Nicholas Homenda, interim Scholarly Communication Librarian

Michael Regoli, Director of Electronic and Journals Publishing, IU Press

Upcoming Workshop: Maximizing Your Research Impact

An Overview of Scholarly Metrics

The Scholarly Communication Department will be presenting a Scholars’ Commons workshop on maximizing research impact and the range of scholarly metrics now available to researchers.

March 29th 2016 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Hazelbaker Hall (E159)

The workshop will provide an overview and introduction to how traditional and nontraditional scholarly metrics, such as Journal Impact Factor, h-index, ImpactStory, and Altmetrics are being used to gather evidence and demonstrate potential value and research impact during promotion and tenure proceedings. Participants will learn the importance of unique author identifiers including ORCID and Researcher ID, and discuss relevant issues such as choosing a journal for your research, open access, and using scholarly networking tools. Academics from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. Bring a brown bag lunch and join us!

Presented by Erica Hayes & Richard Higgins. Register for the workshop here.

Scholarly Communication Consultation Schedule for Spring 2016

This spring staff members from the Scholarly Communication department will once again be holding consultation sessions in the Scholars’ Commons. Naz will hold consultation hours once a week for issues related to copyright and intellectual property. And once per month, Shayna and Richard will be available to answer questions about using the IUScholarWorks institutional repository and the Open Journal System. Our hours for the Spring semester are as follows:

Copyright Information Services
Presented by Naz Pantaloni​
Friday, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm in room 157R

Open Access Publishing
Presented by Shayna Pekala & Richard Higgins
Second Thursday of each month, 2:00 pm – 3:00pm in room 157R
Jan 14, Feb 11, Mar 10, Apr 14

The Scholars Commons is located on the first floor of the East Tower at the Herman B Wells Library. These are drop-in hours, so no appointment is necessary.

New Monographic Series Launched in IUScholarWorks: Ethnomusicology Translations

IUScholarWorks is excited to announce the launch of Ethnomusicology Translations, a new monographic series that publishes ethnomusicological literature translated into English.  I interviewed Steve Stuempfle, Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations, about his experiences initiating this online publication series and he graciously answered a few of my questions:

Erica Hayes: What is Ethnomusicology Translations and how did it get started?

Steve Stuempfle:  Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer-reviewed, open-access online series for the publication of ethnomusicological literature translated into English. The series is published by the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), an organization founded in 1955 to promote research and study of all forms of music and their cultural contexts. For several years, the SEM membership has been calling for increased access to ethnomusicological scholarship across language barriers. We assembled an editorial team to pursue this endeavor and, thanks to a partnership with Indiana University Libraries, obtained a publishing platform. Our hope is that the new publication will be read not only by ethnomusicologists but by scholars from other fields and by anyone with an interest in music around the world.

How long have you been involved with Ethnomusicology Translations and in what capacity?

I have been working on translations initiatives at SEM since joining the organization as Executive Director in 2008. Over the past couple of years, I have been serving as Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations. My job is to address publication logistics, while the editorial team handles content.

Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer reviewed, open access online series. What made you adopt an open access model for this publication series and partner with IU Libraries?

We adopted an open-access model in order to reach as wide an audience as possible. A fundraising campaign at SEM has provided monies for translating, while our editorial team is volunteering their time. We partnered with Indiana University Libraries because of its success in offering quality scholarly publications through IUScholarWorks.

Who can nominate articles for inclusion in Ethnomusicology Translations and what is the nomination process?

Anyone can nominate an article to Ethnomusicology Translations by emailing General Editor Richard Wolf at rwolf@fas.harvard.edu. For brief nomination guidelines, see http://www.ethnomusicology.org/?Pub_EthnoTrans. Accepted nominations are assigned to a manuscript editor and then to a translator.

What are your plans for Ethnomusicology Translations over the next few years?

Our goal for the next few years is to publish translations of important ethnomusicological articles from a wide range of languages. Since Ethnomusicological Translations is a monograph series, rather than a journal, translated articles can be published at any time—as soon as they have gone through the peer review and editorial process. Each issue of Ethnomusicology Translation is a single article.

Open Access Week 2015

It’s that time of year again!  On October 19th-23rd, IU Bloomington will celebrate Open Access Week 2015.  Open Access Week is a great opportunity for students, faculty, and librarians to learn more about the potential benefits of open access scholarship and research.  In lieu of this year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration,” IU Bloomington has put together a great series of workshops with speakers from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research, Indiana University Press, and the IU Libraries.  Topics of discussion will include data management, academic publishing for early-career researchers, journal publishing agreements, and more.  All are encouraged to attend and learn from each other!

See below for a detailed list of workshops to be held during Open Access Week 2015:

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Wells W144 | 3pm-4pm
Open Lab: IUScholarWorks

  • Shayna Pekala and Richard Higgins, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Wells E159 | 3pm-4pm
What You Need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Wells E159 | 12pm-1pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

 Friday, October 23, 2015 | Wells E158 | 11am-1pm
Data Management 101 (Lunch included)

  • Heather Coates, Michelle Dalmau, and Jennifer Laherty, Indiana University Libraries
  • Tassie Gniady and Sofia McDowell, Office of Research Compliance
  • Kristy Kallback-Rose, UITS Research Technologies
  • Jennifer Guiliano, Department of History, IUPUI
  • Kalani Craig, Department of History, IUB