IUScholarWorks: Share and preserve your work in IU’s institutional repository

The IUScholarWorks repository is one of the open scholarship services at Indiana University Libraries.  It provides a platform to make the research, instructional tools, and creative activities of IU scholars freely available, while ensuring these resources are curated, discoverable and preserved for the future. Faculty and graduate students can freely deposit their work in IUScholarWorks. Undergraduate students who have faculty permission can also make their work digitally and freely available.

Whether you want to share your work with the university or the world, build a digital collection of your work in one place, or you need to share your work in order to comply with a grant, the repository supports sharing  a wide variety of materials, including:

You can also use IUScholarWorks to create a central space for published work e.g. related articles, questionnaires, manuals, underlying data, methodologies, presentations, protocols, and course syllabi.  Use our CV Service to do this, or create a research collection on IU ScholarWorks

Depositing your work in the IUScholarWorks repository makes your work more discoverable, easy to cite, and provides metrics on use.  Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work.  Each deposit is assigned a persistent URL such as a handle, or a DOI.  IUScholarWorks is indexed by major search engines, such as Google Scholar.  

Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work, regardless of whether they are associated with Indiana University.

You can link your work that is deposited in the institutional repository with your Google Scholar profile, or your ORCID record. Google Scholar profiles are one of the most common tools used by researchers to publicize and track their work, receive alerts about new citations, and gather metrics for promotion and  tenure dossiers.

ORCID is a unique identifier connecting you with your entire scholarly record, not just your publications. You can connect your ORCID with publications,  grant funding, organizations at which you have worked or studied, and other identifiers.

ORCID can automatically update this information if you choose to set up that option.  Having an ORCID increases the accuracy, transparency, and visibility of your scholarly record.

You can post the IUScholarWorks link for your work or collection to ORCID or on professional online communities and social media platforms such as personal or departmental blogs, LinkedIn, Twitter, or other social networking resources used by scholars. When posting to social network platforms, it’s a good idea to write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important.

Tip: Write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important, then post the summary and a link to the item in IUScholarWorks on the platform of your choice.

Remember that your affiliation with Indiana University or similar institutions affords you information privilege that others do not enjoy, by giving you a high level of access to “research material, including journal articles, data, and primary sources…. access to additional research support, faculty, and a peer network, [and] the opportunity to build upon existing research and enter the scholarly conversation”.

There are plenty of people who might need access to your studies–scholars from small institutionslow-income countriespatient advocatespatients themselvescitizen scientists, and members of the general public. Publishing open access will enable a wide range of persons to access and learn from your work.

Your work is worth sharing!  Register on IUScholarworks today (https://scholarworks.iu.edu/deposit) , and email iusw@indiana.edu for authorization to deposit your work in IUScholarWorks!

 

Using Podcasts and Videos for Scholarly Communication

In recent years, many libraries have started to promote their resources and engage with patrons, the local community, and the larger world through social media. This is perhaps most obvious on Twitter–our own IU Libraries has a strong presence at @iulibraries and @hermanbwells. Still, there are other platforms, including Instagram and Snapchat, that are key for engaging  younger library patrons. Both the Herman B Wells account and the Lilly Library account have worked hard to make information about the library accessible and relevant via these platforms.

Podcasts are becoming yet another new and exciting avenue for informing researchers, students, and other library patrons of library services and engaging them with the complexities of 21st century library work. These kinds of podcasts—either hosted by or focused on librarians/libraries—are becoming increasingly popular. Some of my favorites include the Public Library Association’s podcast, the librarian-run All Booked Up and The Librarian is In and  the American Library Association’s Dewey Decibel Podcast. Last fall, the Scholarly Communication Department experimented with podcasting and capturing audio testimony through a series of interviews. The goal of podcasting was to make the concept of open access more approachable and understandable to all patrons. The podcasts were also an opportunity to zoom in on specific services the department offers and better understand how those services impact the IU community at large.

The department decided to position these podcasts around the theme of Open Access and Open Education, which are valuable commitments to us (and libraries as a whole!). In that spirit, we narrowed the interviewees down to three people: Willa Liburd Tavernier, the Open Scholarship Resident and Visiting Assistant Librarian at IU Bloomington; Michael Morrone, Senior Lecturer at the Kelley School of Business and editor of IU Libraries Open Access Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; and Brant Ellsworth, Assistant Professor of Humanities at Central Penn College and editor of IU Open Access Journal Children’s Folklore Review.

Working with the IU Faculty Media Production Space, we interviewed each person, recording both video and audio. Capturing video allowed us to take important clips and put them on Instagram and YouTube. Samuel Underwood in Collaboration Technology and Classroom Support was integral in helping us edit and these clips, which cover everything from the diversity and accessibility of the open access movement to recognizing that students lose access to scholarly research:

Anyone interested in starting an OA journal or learning more about IU Libraries Journal Publishing Program will also be interested in:

Finally, full audio clips are available for anyone who would like to listen. These clips offer listeners more information about the importance of open access and highlight how journals can make the leap to OA :

The Scholarly Communication Department is excited about reaching researchers and students in new ways. Questions? E-mail iusw@indiana.edu.

Ownership & Openness in Scholarly Publishing Panel Recap

On February 20, 2019, the IU Libraries Scholarly Communications department hosted a panel, “Ownership & Openness in Scholarly Publishing: A Panel Discussion on Reforming Academic Journals,”  that brought together IU faculty, staff, graduate students, and other professionals from various aspects of scholarly studies and publishing. The panelists included Cassidy Sugimoto, Gabriele Guidi, Vincent Larivière, and Bernie Frischer. The panel’s goal was to discuss the process of “flipping” journals–the process of converting subscription-based journals to open access journals, the experiences of two different  journals in their transition to open access, and the implications of the open access movement on research.

flier for ownership and openness panel

Cassidy Sugimoto is an IU School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering (SICE) professor, and is one of the former editors of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics. She is one of the individuals who played an instrumental role in flipping the journal that is now known as Quantitative Science Studies. She is also the president of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). Vincent Larivière is an associate ILS professor at the School of Library Science at the University of Montreal. He was also on the editorial board of the Journal of Informetrics and played a significant role in making QSS open access.

The Journal of Informetrics saw its entire editorial board resign earlier this year– after an extensive but unproductive process to resolve their differences with Elsevier– in order to create a new journal that is more in line with open access principles and practices. The new journal, Quantitative Science Studies, has been accepted and is supported by The International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics. Sugimoto, Larivière, and their colleagues hope that moves such as theirs, which are happening increasingly as journals work toward being open access, will spur other journal editors and staff to work to make their own journals part of this movement.  As of January 2019, QSS is accepting submissions.

Gabriele Guidi, an engineering professor from the Politecnico di Milano, and Bernie Frischer, an IU SICE informatics professor, are co-founders of the open-access journal Studies in Digital Heritage (SDH), previously known as the Digital Applications in Archaeology & Cultural Heritage under Elsevier. After attempting to collaborate with Elsevier to remedy concerns about their high APC for open access, their unwillingness to help the journal embed 3D models for illustration and interactivity, and their discontent with the slow growth of the journal, Guidi and Frischer chose to cut ties. In October of 2016, they parted ways with Elsevier and have since been taking the necessary steps to make their journal open access. Since publishing with IU Libraries, Studies in Digital Heritage has published 50 articles in 2 years, culminating in 2 issues per year. The journal has been able to not charge an APC or a subscription fee to any of its users.

Guidi also cited open access efforts as helping to combat issues of oligopoly and indexing in scientific publishing. Reed-Elsevier, Springer, Wiley-Blackwell, Taylor and Francis, and SAGE currently dominate the publishing market. This leads to exorbitant costs, anywhere from $2,000-$4,000 (or more) for authors to publish in a high-impact journal. In contrast, collaborating with a university library to publish an open access journal can provide a more sustainable model. For example the institution invests so that authors pay a smaller fee, which can be as low as $250. Lower costs and increased freedom in publishing practices are among the factors that are drawing editors to the open access movement.

This panel brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines and approaches to advancing access and research. The question and answer period was lively, with audience members asking questions ranging from how open access journals will impact student research to what the success of open access journals and their funding looks like long-term. The panelists’ responses to trends in open access and scholarly publishing illustrated that the push toward open access is crucial for the success and sustainability of academic publications, as well as determining what resources remain available to future scholars. Although there are obvious hurdles in the process of making a journal open access, based on the discussions that took place over the course of this panel it would seem that a growing number of editors are willing to make the change in order to attempt to disrupt the often frustrating current trends in academic publishing.

Find the presentation slides in our institutional repository: http://doi.org/10.5967/s1d3-hp09

Stream the recording here: http://go.iu.edu/29JD

Questions about flipping a journal with IU Libraries? Contact IUSW@indiana.edu

Publishing Your Dissertation Open Access

IUScholarWorks is our repository, intended for anyone affiliated with IU to share their research openly so that it’s available for anyone in the world to read. It’s important to remember that this includes graduate students! Graduate students can share papers, data, posters, and even their dissertation in IUScholarWorks.

Sharing a dissertation in IUScholarWorks (sometimes called IUSW) has many benefits for authors, including:

  • increased discoverability of the dissertation, as it will become indexed in Google Scholar
  • long-term preservation, ensuring scholars can access it in several decades and beyond
  • the agency to decide how the dissertation should be licensed. Authors can choose one of several Creative Commons licenses based on how they would like others to use their work (this is optional)
  • the ability to embargo (or limit access) to the dissertation for up to five years
  • a free mechanism for sharing–there is never an additional cost for authors

Sharing Your Dissertation

When a dissertation or thesis has reached its final stage, all graduate students must submit an electronic version of their thesis or dissertation to ProQuest via the Graduate School Website instructions.

ProQuest provides multiple services and options for publishing a dissertation. Traditional publication with ProQuest means that the dissertation will be included in the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. This option is free for the author but in order to access the thesis or dissertation, readers will either need to be affiliated with a library or pay a fee. The 25 most-accessed ProQuest theses and dissertations for last month cost around $38 each to download for those not affiliated with a library or organization with access. However, this model does provide authors with other other add-on services, including the ability to print a physical copy and the option of copyright registration for a $55 fee. 

ProQuest offers an additional option: authors can publish their dissertation or thesis open access in their database PQDT Open for an additional fee, shifting the cost from the reader to the author. Making a dissertation open gives anyone, regardless of affiliation or socioeconomic status the ability to access it. There are a few important considerations for authors interested in this option.  ProQuest charges authors a $95 fee for this option, which might be a challenge for some authors. Additionally, while PQDT Open dissertations are free for all to read, it’s unclear if authors can select a Creative Commons License for their work, which enables authors to explicitly tell others how they can use the dissertation or thesis.

The University of Chicago has a useful summary of the difference between traditional ProQuest dissertation publication, PQDT Open publishing, and publishing in a repository (like IUScholarWorks).

Will making my work open access mean I can’t rework it into an article or book?

Some students worry that publishers will not publish a book or article that is based on a dissertation. First and foremost, you should consult with publishers (or published authors/ mentors) in your field if you have ideas about developing your work further and are concerned about this.

It’s important to remember that when a dissertation goes through the publication process, a lot of the information changes in some shape or form. In other words, it’s unlikely that a dissertation can be republished without major edits.  Dee Mortensen, Senior Sponsoring Editor at the IU Press, compares the relationship between a dissertation and a book to that of a chrysalis and a butterfly.

Because of the substantial alteration involved in the transformation of book to dissertation, it is often not an issue to make the original dissertation available. The study “Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?” supports this claim, finding that most publishers (93% of university presses) do not consider a dissertation a prior publication that would disqualify the revised version from publication.

If you’re still concerned, remember that you can embargo your dissertation for up to five years in IUScholarWorks. An embargo would mean that readers can find information (sometimes called metadata) about your dissertation on the web but they would not be able to read the full-text of the work until a specified date.

IUSW staff are happy to discuss this option with you in more detail if you’re interested. Staff can also consult with authors about Creative Commons licensing and selecting the best license based on your goals for your work.

You can submit your thesis or dissertation  to IUSW here. A staff member will deposit it and respond to you with the link–it’s that simple!

You can also view all of this information in detail in a handy slide deck by our very own Sarah Hare (PDF link). If you are an advisor or faculty member and would like us to come to your class or event to talk to your students about dissertations, please e-mail us at iusw@indiana.edu. 

IU Bloomington Open Access Article Publishing Fund

Are you interested in publishing a manuscript in an open access journal, but concerned about securing funds to pay the article processing charge (APC)? The IU Libraries and Office of the Vice Provost for Research have collaborated to establish a new Open Access Article Publishing Fund for faculty on the IU Bloomington campus. Faculty may apply for up to $2,000 to cover the article processing charges associated with eligible journal articles.

break through publishing barriersFund FAQ

Eligibility

Who is eligible for the Open Access Article Publishing Fund?

IU Bloomington tenured, tenure-eligible, and non-tenure-track faculty, research scientists, research scholars, research center directors, and librarians are eligible.

What kinds of publications are eligible for funding?

Peer-reviewed journal articles in journals that meet the following criteria are eligible:

  • The journal is fully open access (ie, the journal provides immediate, unfettered access to all articles)
  • The journal is either: listed in the Directory of Open Access Journals, a member of the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association or adheres to its code of conduct, or a publisher that Indiana University Bloomington believes is taking a sustainable and affordable approach to open access publishing

How do I find out if my journal is eligible?

Contact the Scholarly Communication Department.


Co-authorship

What if I have non-IU Bloomington co-authors on the manuscript?

In the case of an article with multiple non-IU co-authors, each author is responsible for a prorated portion of any publishing fees. For example, for an article with three authors that is to appear in a journal with a $3,000 publication fee, each author is responsible for $1,000 of that fee.

What if I have IU Bloomington faculty co-authors on the manuscript?

In the case of an article with multiple IU Bloomington authors, each author is responsible for a prorated portion of any publishing fees. For example, for an article with two authors that is to appear in a journal with a $2,000 publication fee, each IU Bloomington author may apply for up to $1,000

What if I have IUPUI co-authors on the manuscript?

IUPUI has its own IUPUI Open Access Fund. Applicants with IU Bloomington/ IUPUI co-authored manuscripts are encouraged to contact the Scholarly Communication Department to coordinate joint applications.

What if I have student co-authors on the manuscript?

The fund will not count student authors when splitting APC responsibility among co-authors. For example, in the case of a manuscript with one IU Bloomington faculty author, one IU Bloomington graduate student, and one non-IU Bloomington faculty author with an APC of $2,000, each faculty author would be responsible for 50% of the APC, and the IU Bloomington faculty author could apply for up to $1,000 in funding to cover the cost of 50% of the APC.


Payment

If my application is accepted, how will the APC be paid?

The Open Access Article Publishing Fund will pay publisher invoices directly – reimbursement is not possible and authors with approved applications will not pay for APCs from personal or research funds. More details will be sent upon approval.

Are there strings attached?

We do ask that all fund recipients deposit their published article in our institutional repository and complete a brief survey, but there are no additional requirements.


Application

How do I apply for the fund?

To read more about the fund and to apply, visit the OVPR internal funding opportunity page here: https://research.iu.edu/funding-proposals/funding/opportunities/open-access-journal-fund/index.html

Who can I contact with questions?

Questions may be directed to the IU Libraries (iusw @ indiana.edu ) or the OVPR (ovprgrnt @ indiana.edu).

Jenny Hoops: Our New Open Access Publishing Manager

We’re very excited to share that Jenny Hoops will begin as the department’s new Open Access Publishing Manager on January 7, 2019. In this role, Jenny will provide user support for the department’s journal program and institutional repository. Jenny will also oversee the creation of documentation to support users and contribute feature requests to our development team in order to improve systems and workflows. Jenny will take over for Richard Higgins, who previously served as Open Access Publishing Manager. He joined the Library Technologies Unit in October 2018 as a Programmer/Analyst and continues to work closely with the department.

photo of jenny hoops

Previously, Jenny served as Digital Publishing Assistant in the Scholarly Communication Department, collaborating with SC staff to lead and assess several projects. Jenny is currently completing her Library Science degree. Her research interests include open publishing trends and digital accessibility/literacy. Before coming to IU, she completed a bachelor’s degree in history and gender/sexuality studies at Grinnell College. 

Please join me in welcoming Jenny to the Libraries!

cOAlition S: The Future of Research

On September 4th of this year, Open Access advocates and scientists around the world woke up to some big news: eleven European national research agencies, the European Commission, and the European Research Council (which represents all the national scientific organizations of European Union member states) announced that they were launching cOAlition S which will require all research funded by these organizations to be fully Open Access by January 1st 2020.

This is a major coup for Open Access activists and a step in the right direction for worldwide scientific research. Not only will cutting-edge and high quality research papers be easy and free for anyone to access, but this will also help to kick-start innovation among open access publications  and encourage more institutions, funders and scientists to be deliberate in choosing an Open Access journals and platforms for their research.

Along with this requirement, the cOAlition S announced ten guiding principles in their Plan S, which I will break down below:

Copyright:

•  Authors retain copyright of their publications without restrictions. All publications must be published under an open license, preferably the Creative Commons Attribution Licence CC BY. In all cases, the license applied should fulfill the requirements defined by the Berlin Declaration;

Perhaps  one of the most important guiding principles of Open Access, Plan S recognizes that authors should a) retain copyright to their work, b) get credit for the work they do, and c) enable anyone to share, adapt, remix, and build upon their work. You can also read more about CC-BY in this fantastic post by the Open Access Scholarly Publishers Association.

Funding and Organization

•  The Funders will ensure jointly the establishment of robust criteria and requirements for the services that compliant high quality Open Access journals and Open Access platforms must provide
•  In case such high quality Open Access journals or platforms do not yet exist, the Funders will, in a coordinated way, provide incentives to establish and support them when appropriate; support will also be provided for Open Access infrastructures where necessary;
•  The ‘hybrid’ model of publishing is not compliant with the above principles;

These three points are absolutely crucial to understanding–the Funders are clearly spelling out their support for establishing platforms, services, journals, and incentives for the publication of scientific research. They are also saying that even if these routes of publication do not yet exist that they will support them. What this means is that we may begin to see increasing academic, financial and intellectual support behind OA platforms, journals and monographs. Finally, they are taking the stance that hybrid models are not compliant with their principals, and that they will support increasing openness. A hybrid model is, for example, when a journal will allow authors to make their article open access–but only for a fee. cOAlition S is taking steps to do away with this hybrid model.

Institutional Support

•  Where applicable, Open Access publication fees are covered by the Funders or universities, not by individual researchers; it is acknowledged that all scientists should be able to publish their work •  Open Access even if their institutions have limited means;
When Open Access publication fees are applied, their funding is standardised and capped (across Europe);
•  The Funders will ask universities, research organisations, and libraries to align their policies and strategies, notably to ensure transparency;
•  The importance of open archives and repositories for hosting research outputs is acknowledged because of their long-term archiving function and their potential for editorial innovation;

These four bullet points show that the Funders are bringing real heavyweight institutional support to the forefront of the agenda. The first point especially, that the Funders or author universities will cover the cost of publication fees is momentous for researchers. As covered in great detail by Nature and Paywall: The Movie, the fees charged to authors who want to make their articles Open Access can be burdensome. Additionally, the policy of standardizing Open Access fees will help to bring down costs across disciplines in Europe.

It is notable that cOAlition S gives high praise to archives, libraries and repositories. As demonstrated by our own experience at IU, institutional repositories like IU ScholarWorks and IU Scholarworks Open are great ways to distribute Open Access research as they allow access by an international community of learners to research and information.

The Plan S goal is that all journal and other non-book scholarly work should be Open Access by 1 January 2020–and they that they will monitor compliance and sanction non-compliance. You can read more about cOAlition S, the member organizations, and their plans here.

Plan S is an exciting Open Access breakthrough that promises a more accessible and transparent future for research.

Journal of Academic Advising Publishes Inaugural Issue

The Scholarly Communication department is excited to share that the Journal of Academic Advising (JAA), a recently launched open access publication, has published its first issue. This journal focuses on fostering interdisciplinary communication and collaboration between academic advising professionals through the publishing of research relating to different aspects of advising. The publication of the first issue coincides with NACADA’s annual national conference for academic advisors, where JAA editorial staff will participate in two special sessions: “Expanding Scholarship in Advising Through a New Journal” and “So You Want to be a Scholar: Fostering a Research Environment.”

Cover of Journal of Academic Advising's first issue

 

JAA’s inaugural issue focuses on sustainability and innovation in academic advising, a theme that is highlighted in Cheryl Wanko’s “Advising for Sustainability: A Challenge.” Wanko, an English professor and the chair of the Committee for Advising Excellence at West Chester University, asks how universities and advising can “cultivate more sustainable behaviors and life perspectives to help alter our culture’s self-destructive course” (p. 7), and how daily advising practices can promote awareness of environmental sustainability efforts. Kay S. Hamada, Assistant Specialist and Academic Advisor at the University of Hawai’i Mānoa, also contributed to JAA’s first issue with an article entitled “A Conceptual Framework for Disruptive Innovation in Advising.” Hamada discusses the various ways in which advancements in technology and other services necessitate changing how advising practices are approached. She terms this innovation as being “disruptive” because it often alters the theories and frameworks that have helped create existing practices.

The Journal of Academic Advising asks important questions about the impact that advisers and advising can have, outside of their traditional roles. JAA is completely open access, providing an audience for the content that may extend beyond the field of advising. The Scholarly Communication Department looks forward to the ideas and perspectives that this journal will bring to the table in further issues.

Office of Scholarly Publishing in the News

This summer, the Office of Scholarly Publishing has been reflecting on the services we provide and the value we bring to IU’s campus and open access scholarly publishing broadly. Simultaneously, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) has been mentioned in several recent articles and news pieces on open access publishing and author rights. I believe that these pieces start to answer our questions about the value, perspective, and expertise that we contribute to the larger community.

Jason Jackson’s post, which discusses Museum Anthropology Review’s business and labor model, highlights the instrumental role library publishers play in the open access ecosystem. Jason states,

I am not able to quantify the financial investments that the IU Libraries have made in MAR via the IUSW program, but the investment is significant and important…. just as MAR tries to serve the field without charging fees for that service, IUSW tries to serve projects like MAR without charging fees for that service. It is certainly the case that economies of scale have been realized by having library-based publishing support services that can concurrently help a wide range of (mostly small) journal projects.

Another recent piece, “What Happened, or, Impasses and Future Horizons for an Open Anthropology of Work” grapples with the challenges of operationalizing open access in the field of anthropology. The editorial cites conversations with the Office of Scholarly Publishing to make an important anthropology title, Anthropology Work Review, open access. While the effort was not successful and we do not currently publish AWR, the piece is important for demonstrating the values that IU’s OSP is dedicated to. Conversations with AWR were also a reflective exercise for our team, as they forced us to reflect on and operationalize our values, which in turn led to a better understanding of our own mission and ethics.

Finally, a recent op ed (first presented as a keynote) discusses the 50th anniversary of the Liberian Studies Association and mentions the association’s journal, the Liberian Studies Journal. The OSP currently hosts the journal’s back issues and is in conversations to help the publication renew publication efforts.

When I think about what OSP is and what we aim to be, I envision a meaningful partnership between IU Press and IU Libraries Scholarly Communication staff that encourages cross-pollination, harnesses disparate publishing resources, and pools expertise strategically in order to transform scholarly publishing at IU by:

  1. Serving IU faculty and students, through journal publishing, open access book publishing, and course material publishing.
  2. Moving conversations on publishing innovations forward on campus and in the larger community. This includes, but isn’t limited to, conversations around experimental peer review, course material affordability, hybrid OA models, open source infrastructure, and new modes of scholarship, including 3D object and multi-media integration.  
  3. Educating the next generation of scholars, both through supporting the creation of student publishing projects and creating programming and hands-on experiences for students interested in publishing, open access, and scholarly career paths.
  4. Moving the national conversation on library publishing, library/press partnerships, and open access forward.

I’m excited to see that we are already making a significant impact in several of these areas, including number four. The pieces above demonstrate that we are both inspiring and contributing to important national conversations that will impact the future of open access publishing.

Summer Project Roundup

Campus may be deserted, but Scholarly Communication is working hard this summer to wrap up projects (and start some new ones) before the fall semester. Here are some of the things we’re looking forward to this summer:

  • Video training modules: Starting with some of our most frequently asked questions, we will be creating short explanatory modules that can be watched individually or linked together to create a training program for a system, concept, or policy.
  • Open Scholarship expansion: Our website, openscholarship.indiana.edu will be undergoing some changes to better reflect the work we are doing and provide some more content for our patrons. You can expect a new and improved workflow for depositing data into IUScholarWorks as well as information on creating and adopting Open Educational Resources.
  • Crossref Cited-by: We are exploring the possibility of participating in the Cited-by service, which would enable authors and readers who use our journal programs to discover who is citing the articles we publish.
  • Journal metrics: This summer we are working on a plan to share journal usage data with editorial teams. We hope to have a plan and template in place by September so that we can launch the service in fall.

If you have questions or would like to propose a project to the Scholarly Communication department, don’t hesitate to reach out by email (iusw@indiana.edu) or tweet us @iulibraries