Open Access Week 2020

The theme of this year’s Open Access Week is “Open with Purpose: Taking Action to Build Structural Equity and Inclusion”. This marks the third year where the open access community has been asked to consider equity as a central theme of scholarly research and publications. 

This year’s theme aims to encourage more actionable items from participants, despite the upheaval many academic libraries are currently facing. While the COVID-19 pandemic has certainly caused significant disruption in our daily lives and work, it has also given us a chance to examine our existing structures and workflows more critically before moving forward. Beyond examining, we now have a chance to update and upgrade our information structures to include diversity and inclusion at all levels.

In response to some of the events of this year, the Scholarly Communication team has worked to embed this year’s theme into our practice and content. IU Libraries crafted a LibGuide for Temporary Free Access to Academic Resources during COVID-19, as well as resources that are always open access. In response to the protests across the country against police brutality that occurred this summer, one of our department’s graduate students, Margaret McLaughlin, also compiled a Black Lives Matter Resources List, which includes both open access content and works available through IU Libraries.

For anyone looking to expand their knowledge of open access and learn more about trends and new ideas related to OA, check out our compiled Open Access Week Reading List. This list includes two articles written by members of our team: “A Qualitative Study on the Digital Preservation of OER” by Sarah Hare, which details why and how libraries should assist in the long-term preservation of open educational resources, and “COVID-19 Demonstrates the Value of Open Access: What Happens Next?” by Willa Tavernier, which discusses the potential future for the open access movement and ways in which this pandemic may have disrupted the monopoly of large commercial publishers. Other articles address the current effectiveness of APC funds, the infrastructure of open science, and the unfortunate trend for more quality news outlets and scientific papers to be locked behind paywalls compared to free, but often false, information. All of these works themselves are available open access!

Finally, we also have Open Access Week Zoom backgrounds designed by our incredible graduate student, Alexis Murrell. Feel free to use any and all of them to celebrate this week and beyond!

Black Lives Matter: IU Libraries Curates Resource List

With the rising awareness and discourse surrounding racial inequity in the United States, you may have noticed several resource lists curated to educate and inform the public. These include, but are not limited to, Black-authored revolutionary texts, histories of race relations in the United States, Anti-Racism toolkits, and tips for meaningful allyship. You may also have noticed that these resources often do not last long and are often modified or removed entirely. This may happen for a number of reasons, including the failure to obtain proper permissions to post and publicly disseminate the resources they used. To create a more stable collection of resources, IU Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Department has created a list of materials consisting entirely of either library licensed content for IU Bloomington affiliates or open access resources, meaning they are free and available for the public to use and disseminate. As an IUB affiliate, you can freely access all items on our Black Lives Matter resource list

Library Licensed Content

The Libraries’ collection contains many foundational Black revolutionary texts and other resources. All library licensed content (LLC) is available to  anyone with an IU Bloomington affiliation at no cost. This list contains a combination of e-resources, which can be accessed online with your CAS credentials, and print resources, which can be checked-out through the Libraries’ no-contact Paged Pickup. A few of the resources, while not normally available electronically, have been digitized through the Hathi Trust Emergency Temporary Access Service. These are marked by the Hathi Trust logo on the resources IUCAT page. To access these, click on the logo and login with your CAS credentials. Some highlights from the LLC resources are:

  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (Michelle Alexander, e-book)
    • This book examines the relationship between systematic racism and incarceration, specifically among black males, and inequity which Alexander claims needs to be treated as both a racial justice and civil rights issue.
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou, autobiography)
    • Angelou’s autobiography serves as a coming of age story which details the author’s experiences and recovery from racism and its surrounding traumas.
  • Teaching to Transgress (bell hooks, book)
    • bell hooks’ pedagogical theory suggests teaching students to “transgress” against boundaries and biarnies of race, class, sex, etc. to achieve free and democratic thinking. 
  • The Racial Contract (Charles Mills, essay)
    • This foundational essay challenges white European-centered philosophical thinking, arguing that these philosophers create a “Racial Contract” that perpetuates (either implicitly or explicitly) white supremacy and the disclosure of black voices. 
  • Algorithms of Oppression (Safiya Noble, book)
    • Noble’s book demonstrates how seemingly innocuous tools, such as Google, maintain the white control of information and perpetuate racism. 

Open Access Resources

For those without an IU affiliation, the list also contains several open access resources. Open access resources are those which can be freely accessed by the public without restrictions. All resources marked with an “OA” are open and can be accessed anywhere and by anyone. Some highlights from the OA resources are:

  • Why The Coronavirus Is Hitting Black Communities Hardest (Code Switch; podcast)
    • This podcast discusses why marginalized communities have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.
  • A Timeline of Racial Progress in the U.S., and the Lack of It, Through the Years by Dr. Carolyn Calloway-Thomas, Chair, African American and African Diaspora Studies at IU Bloomington and Sam Hill, Newsweek contributor
    • This article features a timeline “Racial Progress in America: The Slow March Forward” which highlights the progress and setbacks in seeking racial justice in America
  • The Urgency of Intersectionality (Kimberlé Crenshaw, TED Talk)
    • This TED Talk expands on Crenshaw’s coined term “intersectionality” and the increased biases people face when their different identities (e.g., race, class, sex, sexual orientation, etc.) combine to create more severe forms of oppression.
  • Celeste Bartos Forum: Literacy, Libraries and Liberation (Angela Davis and Toni Morrison; interview with the New York Public Library)
    • A conversation between the New York Public Library, activist/scholar Angela Davis, and author Toni Morrison on racism in libraries. Both a recording and a transcript of the conversation are available. 
  • 13th (Ava DuVernay; documentary)
    • DuVernay’s documentary explores the history of racial inequity in the United States, focusing on the criminal justice system. 
  • Celebrating Black History Month (Poetry Foundation; online collection) 
    • This collection of poems from the Poetry Foundation celebrates and highlights the works of black poets, including Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Hayden, and Langston Hughs. 

This list is by no means comprehensive or finite, but it serves as a starting point for anyone to educate themselves and others about racial inequity. Please contact IUSW@indiana.edu for suggested additions to the resource list or with any questions. 

Data & Visual Literacy and the COVID-19 Infodemic

This post was contributed by Map & Spatial Data Librarian Theresa Quill.

Scholarly and scientific information is distributed in a variety of ways.  The COVID19 pandemic has spurred a large volume of scholarly literature, but also data sharing and data visualization to track the spread of this coronavirus and the impact of efforts to combat it. Some of this information is reliable and some of it is not.

Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian Jackie Fleming and Map & Spatial Data Librarian Theresa Quill were recently published in Digital Culture and Education, discussing their efforts to combat the COVID-19 infodemic.

It is not an exaggeration to say that the evolving situation surrounding COVID-19 is changing the world. This change includes the response and mission of academic libraries. Information about COVID-19 is being published every day in both textual and visual formats. One thing that all of this information has in common is that it is easily accessible to the public. As academic librarians, we believe that it is our job to guide our community to reliable information and teach them how to receive and interpret this information.

The democratization of data visualization and mapping tools over the past decade has meant that creating and sharing visualizations is no longer limited to the realm of experts. While this trend has been overall beneficial, it has also resulted in increased visibility for (mostly unintentionally) misleading or confusing maps and charts and places a greater burden of critically reading and evaluating visualizations on the reader.

The authors say –

“As the Map & Spatial Data Librarian and, Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian at Indiana University-Bloomington, we believed that it was our responsibility to address the surge of visual information being produced daily about COVID-19 cases. We decided that the best action to take was to create a Visual Literacy & Map LibGuide that specifically addressed data visualizations tracking COVID-19 cases. This guide lists reliable data visualizations to follow, tips for reading these visualizations, and general resources for spatial and visual literacy as well as, articles addressing COVID-19 data visualizations. Because COVID-19 is a rapidly evolving situation, we have been periodically adding information to this guide as we find it. We felt that creating this LibGuide was a good first step in developing our campus community’s visual literacy skills in the COVID-19 crisis.”

You can view the research guide here: https://guides.libraries.indiana.edu/visualliteracyandmaps

And the full article here: https://www.digitalcultureandeducation.com/reflections-on-covid19/visual-literacy-and-maps

 

OA Impact Week: Raising Your Research Profile Workshop Recap

On October 24, 2019, the IU Libraries Scholarly Communications Department partnered with the Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity & Inclusion, the Center of Excellence for Women & Technology, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Faculty and Academic Affairs to hold a workshop, “Raising Your Research Profile”  that discussed Open Scholarship at IU as well as opportunities available for faculty and graduate students to increase their research profiles. This presentation was held as part of International Open Access Week, a week for institutions around the globe to facilitate events and initiatives that raise awareness about open access and empower faculty, staff, and students to get involved.

This year’s OA Week theme was  “Open for Whom? Equity in Open Knowledge.” The key concepts behind this theme involve the assessment of open information accessibility and the assurance that every individual is able to participate in open scholarship without barriers. These ideas guide much of our work in the Scholarly Communication Department, with particular interest in equity among the open scholarship contributors. It is important to ensure that every individual is able to contribute his/her research to open access sources so that there is a diverse range of materials available. It was this goal that inspired the workshop. We strive to diversify the voices heard in academic research, and in order to do this it is crucial that we include the work of those who are currently underrepresented. IU scholars are creating excellent, ground-breaking research, and it’s important to draw attention to their work and provide them with the tools and services necessary to share it openly.

At the workshop, Scholarly Communication Librarian Sarah Hare discussed the opportunities for faculty and staff involvement with open access at IU, mentioning specifically the CV Service. With this service, IU Bloomington researchers are to make the full-text of their CV open access and available to all via IUScholarWorks. This service enables you to make as many items as possible from your CV open access conveniently and without breaking your existing copyright agreement. Additionally, depositing your work with IUScholarWorks can create opportunities for career advancement, as the visibility of your work is increased. 

Open Scholarship Resident Willa Liburd Tavernier discussed research impact and how you can utilize IUScholarWorks to increase your visibility, which often leads to increased citation rates. Depositors can take advantage of this along with IUScholarWorks’ built-in metrics – which allow you to see how many times you page has been viewed or downloaded – to expand their academic profile. The Scholarly Communication Department can help you create and manage scholarly profiles profile, including Google Scholar and ORCID, track the impact of your work using online tools, and much more

Our hope is that by increasing the visibility of all scholars and their research we can work toward a future where not only is information open, but where participation is open to all. By striving for this equity, we can shape the foundation of our systems for creating and sharing knowledge to be inclusive, diverse, and reflective of users. 

 

Interested in making your scholarship open in our institutional repository? Contact IUSW@indiana.edu

Find the presentation slides in our institutional repository: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/24692

Sharing Dissertations Beyond the PDF in IUScholarWorks

This blog already provides a summary of the benefits of making your dissertation available in IUScholarWorks as well as details on how to submit your dissertation to the repository. But what if your dissertation is more than a PDF file? What if it includes video, dynamic web content, or other interactive media? IUScholarWorks can still serve as a space for making your work available for anyone around the world to read, regardless of their affiliation. 

We generally call non-traditional, born-digital dissertations “digital dissertations.” Digital dissertations could be as simple as including an extra video or data file alongside a more traditional piece of scholarship or as complex as having a dissertation completely hosted on a dynamic web platform with accompanying text files. Digital dissertations are becoming more widespread as digital scholarship and digital humanities continue to gain momentum. Here are just a few examples and excerpts of what we’re calling digital dissertations: 

Digital dissertations might include capturing performances, integrating images and audio records, modeling concepts with 3D figures, sharing the underlying data behind the research reported in the dissertation, and building new web content that allows the author to organize information in a non-linear structure. 

It’s important to note that while IUScholarWorks is able to host several different types of content and file formats (PDFs, Word documents, text documents, Open Office, slide decks, image formats) and we have creative workarounds for capturing the content in digital dissertations, there are some limitations. Sometimes, particularly with dissertations that are built as websites, the navigation of content is just as important as the content itself and is considered part of the dissertation. While we will be unable to perfectly preserve the navigation and look/feel of a particular website, we can host a majority of the content through alternative methods. We can also capture the “pieces” of most sites, including videos (through Media Collections Online), data, and 3D objects. 

Interested in sharing your digital dissertation? 

 

IU Libraries Partners with MDPI Open Access Program

MDPI open logo

IU Libraries recently partnered with the Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) as part of their Institutional Open Access Program (IOAP), joining over 550 other institutions. Founded in 2010, MDPI is a publisher of open access scientific journals, meaning that all research outputs are openly licensed and disseminated without barriers, financial or otherwise. Open access publishing is occasionally accompanied with an article processing charge, or APC, which helps offset publishing costs traditionally covered by subscription fees. As part of MDPI’s open access program, researchers from partner institutions receive a 10% discount on their APC when publishing with MDPI. For those interested in publishing with MDPI, the following provides a walkthrough of their submission process, including when and how to apply your IU-affiliated APC discount. 

MDPI’s open access program grants free access to their Submission System (SuSy). MDPI aims to “provide libraries and central offices additional control and transparency over papers submitted to [their] journals, and provide early notification of potential costs involved with the submissions.” New users must register with their IU email. Once registered and logged in, researchers can submit a manuscript for publication following MDPI’s 5-step submission process.

Steps 1 and 2 include inputting manuscript and author information, respectively. Authors suggest three peer reviewers in Step 3 and upload their manuscript in either a Word or ZIP file format in Step 4. Step 5 completes the process and sends a confirmation to the journal’s editors. It is here where authors will be prompted to designate their IOAP partnership and any applicable discounts. Authors will be provided with a drop-down box where they can select IU as their institution and receive the discount. 

drop down menu of IOAP partner institutions
Sample drop-down menu of IOAP partner institutions

Once Indiana University is selected, the APC discount will be automatically processed. IU’s partnership with MDPI is non-centralized, so the remaining APC will be invoiced directly to the author. In addition to MDPI, IU has also partnered with Frontiers, which provides a 7.5% discount for IUB affiliates, and SpringerOpen/BioMed Central, which provides a 15% discount. For additional APC support, authors can apply for IU’s Open Access Article Publishing Fund, which provides scholars up to $2,000 per year to cover open access APCs. For further questions regarding APCs, the IOAP partnership, or publishing with MDPI, see MDPI’s IOAP FAQ page or contact iusw@indiana.edu.

IUScholarWorks: Share and preserve your work in IU’s institutional repository

The IUScholarWorks repository is one of the open scholarship services at Indiana University Libraries.  It provides a platform to make the research, instructional tools, and creative activities of IU scholars freely available, while ensuring these resources are curated, discoverable and preserved for the future. Faculty and graduate students can freely deposit their work in IUScholarWorks. Undergraduate students who have faculty permission can also make their work digitally and freely available.

Whether you want to share your work with the university or the world, build a digital collection of your work in one place, or you need to share your work in order to comply with a grant, the repository supports sharing  a wide variety of materials, including:

You can also use IUScholarWorks to create a central space for published work e.g. related articles, questionnaires, manuals, underlying data, methodologies, presentations, protocols, and course syllabi.  Use our CV Service to do this, or create a research collection on IU ScholarWorks

Depositing your work in the IUScholarWorks repository makes your work more discoverable, easy to cite, and provides metrics on use.  Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work.  Each deposit is assigned a persistent URL such as a handle, or a DOI.  IUScholarWorks is indexed by major search engines, such as Google Scholar.  

Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work, regardless of whether they are associated with Indiana University.

You can link your work that is deposited in the institutional repository with your Google Scholar profile, or your ORCID record. Google Scholar profiles are one of the most common tools used by researchers to publicize and track their work, receive alerts about new citations, and gather metrics for promotion and  tenure dossiers.

ORCID is a unique identifier connecting you with your entire scholarly record, not just your publications. You can connect your ORCID with publications,  grant funding, organizations at which you have worked or studied, and other identifiers.

ORCID can automatically update this information if you choose to set up that option.  Having an ORCID increases the accuracy, transparency, and visibility of your scholarly record.

You can post the IUScholarWorks link for your work or collection to ORCID or on professional online communities and social media platforms such as personal or departmental blogs, LinkedIn, Twitter, or other social networking resources used by scholars. When posting to social network platforms, it’s a good idea to write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important.

Tip: Write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important, then post the summary and a link to the item in IUScholarWorks on the platform of your choice.

Remember that your affiliation with Indiana University or similar institutions affords you information privilege that others do not enjoy, by giving you a high level of access to “research material, including journal articles, data, and primary sources…. access to additional research support, faculty, and a peer network, [and] the opportunity to build upon existing research and enter the scholarly conversation”.

There are plenty of people who might need access to your studies–scholars from small institutionslow-income countriespatient advocatespatients themselvescitizen scientists, and members of the general public. Publishing open access will enable a wide range of persons to access and learn from your work.

Your work is worth sharing!  Register on IUScholarWorks today (https://scholarworks.iu.edu/dspace/login), and email iusw@indiana.edu for authorization to deposit your work in IUScholarWorks!

 

Using Podcasts and Videos for Scholarly Communication

In recent years, many libraries have started to promote their resources and engage with patrons, the local community, and the larger world through social media. This is perhaps most obvious on Twitter–our own IU Libraries has a strong presence at @iulibraries and @hermanbwells. Still, there are other platforms, including Instagram and Snapchat, that are key for engaging  younger library patrons. Both the Herman B Wells account and the Lilly Library account have worked hard to make information about the library accessible and relevant via these platforms.

Podcasts are becoming yet another new and exciting avenue for informing researchers, students, and other library patrons of library services and engaging them with the complexities of 21st century library work. These kinds of podcasts—either hosted by or focused on librarians/libraries—are becoming increasingly popular. Some of my favorites include the Public Library Association’s podcast, the librarian-run All Booked Up and The Librarian is In and  the American Library Association’s Dewey Decibel Podcast. Last fall, the Scholarly Communication Department experimented with podcasting and capturing audio testimony through a series of interviews. The goal of podcasting was to make the concept of open access more approachable and understandable to all patrons. The podcasts were also an opportunity to zoom in on specific services the department offers and better understand how those services impact the IU community at large.

The department decided to position these podcasts around the theme of Open Access and Open Education, which are valuable commitments to us (and libraries as a whole!). In that spirit, we narrowed the interviewees down to three people: Willa Liburd Tavernier, the Open Scholarship Resident and Visiting Assistant Librarian at IU Bloomington; Michael Morrone, Senior Lecturer at the Kelley School of Business and editor of IU Libraries Open Access Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; and Brant Ellsworth, Assistant Professor of Humanities at Central Penn College and editor of IU Open Access Journal Children’s Folklore Review.

Working with the IU Faculty Media Production Space, we interviewed each person, recording both video and audio. Capturing video allowed us to take important clips and put them on Instagram and YouTube. Samuel Underwood in Collaboration Technology and Classroom Support was integral in helping us edit and these clips, which cover everything from the diversity and accessibility of the open access movement to recognizing that students lose access to scholarly research:

Anyone interested in starting an OA journal or learning more about IU Libraries Journal Publishing Program will also be interested in:

Finally, full audio clips are available for anyone who would like to listen. These clips offer listeners more information about the importance of open access and highlight how journals can make the leap to OA :

The Scholarly Communication Department is excited about reaching researchers and students in new ways. Questions? E-mail iusw@indiana.edu.

Ownership & Openness in Scholarly Publishing Panel Recap

On February 20, 2019, the IU Libraries Scholarly Communications department hosted a panel, “Ownership & Openness in Scholarly Publishing: A Panel Discussion on Reforming Academic Journals,”  that brought together IU faculty, staff, graduate students, and other professionals from various aspects of scholarly studies and publishing. The panelists included Cassidy Sugimoto, Gabriele Guidi, Vincent Larivière, and Bernie Frischer. The panel’s goal was to discuss the process of “flipping” journals–the process of converting subscription-based journals to open access journals, the experiences of two different  journals in their transition to open access, and the implications of the open access movement on research.

flier for ownership and openness panel

Cassidy Sugimoto is an IU School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering (SICE) professor, and is one of the former editors of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics. She is one of the individuals who played an instrumental role in flipping the journal that is now known as Quantitative Science Studies. She is also the president of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). Vincent Larivière is an associate ILS professor at the School of Library Science at the University of Montreal. He was also on the editorial board of the Journal of Informetrics and played a significant role in making QSS open access.

The Journal of Informetrics saw its entire editorial board resign earlier this year– after an extensive but unproductive process to resolve their differences with Elsevier– in order to create a new journal that is more in line with open access principles and practices. The new journal, Quantitative Science Studies, has been accepted and is supported by The International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics. Sugimoto, Larivière, and their colleagues hope that moves such as theirs, which are happening increasingly as journals work toward being open access, will spur other journal editors and staff to work to make their own journals part of this movement.  As of January 2019, QSS is accepting submissions.

Gabriele Guidi, an engineering professor from the Politecnico di Milano, and Bernie Frischer, an IU SICE informatics professor, are co-founders of the open-access journal Studies in Digital Heritage (SDH), previously known as the Digital Applications in Archaeology & Cultural Heritage under Elsevier. After attempting to collaborate with Elsevier to remedy concerns about their high APC for open access, their unwillingness to help the journal embed 3D models for illustration and interactivity, and their discontent with the slow growth of the journal, Guidi and Frischer chose to cut ties. In October of 2016, they parted ways with Elsevier and have since been taking the necessary steps to make their journal open access. Since publishing with IU Libraries, Studies in Digital Heritage has published 50 articles in 2 years, culminating in 2 issues per year. The journal has been able to not charge an APC or a subscription fee to any of its users.

Guidi also cited open access efforts as helping to combat issues of oligopoly and indexing in scientific publishing. Reed-Elsevier, Springer, Wiley-Blackwell, Taylor and Francis, and SAGE currently dominate the publishing market. This leads to exorbitant costs, anywhere from $2,000-$4,000 (or more) for authors to publish in a high-impact journal. In contrast, collaborating with a university library to publish an open access journal can provide a more sustainable model. For example the institution invests so that authors pay a smaller fee, which can be as low as $250. Lower costs and increased freedom in publishing practices are among the factors that are drawing editors to the open access movement.

This panel brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines and approaches to advancing access and research. The question and answer period was lively, with audience members asking questions ranging from how open access journals will impact student research to what the success of open access journals and their funding looks like long-term. The panelists’ responses to trends in open access and scholarly publishing illustrated that the push toward open access is crucial for the success and sustainability of academic publications, as well as determining what resources remain available to future scholars. Although there are obvious hurdles in the process of making a journal open access, based on the discussions that took place over the course of this panel it would seem that a growing number of editors are willing to make the change in order to attempt to disrupt the often frustrating current trends in academic publishing.

Find the presentation slides in our institutional repository: http://doi.org/10.5967/s1d3-hp09

Stream the recording here: http://go.iu.edu/29JD

Questions about flipping a journal with IU Libraries? Contact IUSW@indiana.edu

Publishing Your Dissertation Open Access

IUScholarWorks is our repository, intended for anyone affiliated with IU to share their research openly so that it’s available for anyone in the world to read. It’s important to remember that this includes graduate students! Graduate students can share papers, data, posters, and even their dissertation in IUScholarWorks.

Sharing a dissertation in IUScholarWorks (sometimes called IUSW) has many benefits for authors, including:

  • increased discoverability of the dissertation, as it will become indexed in Google Scholar
  • long-term preservation, ensuring scholars can access it in several decades and beyond
  • the agency to decide how the dissertation should be licensed. Authors can choose one of several Creative Commons licenses based on how they would like others to use their work (this is optional)
  • the ability to embargo (or limit access) to the dissertation for up to five years
  • a free mechanism for sharing–there is never an additional cost for authors

Sharing Your Dissertation

When a dissertation or thesis has reached its final stage, all graduate students must submit an electronic version of their thesis or dissertation to ProQuest via the Graduate School Website instructions.

ProQuest provides multiple services and options for publishing a dissertation. Traditional publication with ProQuest means that the dissertation will be included in the ProQuest Dissertation and Theses database. This option is free for the author but in order to access the thesis or dissertation, readers will either need to be affiliated with a library or pay a fee. The 25 most-accessed ProQuest theses and dissertations for last month cost around $38 each to download for those not affiliated with a library or organization with access. However, this model does provide authors with other other add-on services, including the ability to print a physical copy and the option of copyright registration for a $55 fee. 

ProQuest offers an additional option: authors can publish their dissertation or thesis open access in their database PQDT Open for an additional fee, shifting the cost from the reader to the author. Making a dissertation open gives anyone, regardless of affiliation or socioeconomic status the ability to access it. There are a few important considerations for authors interested in this option.  ProQuest charges authors a $95 fee for this option, which might be a challenge for some authors. Additionally, while PQDT Open dissertations are free for all to read, it’s unclear if authors can select a Creative Commons License for their work, which enables authors to explicitly tell others how they can use the dissertation or thesis.

The University of Chicago has a useful summary of the difference between traditional ProQuest dissertation publication, PQDT Open publishing, and publishing in a repository (like IUScholarWorks).

Will making my work open access mean I can’t rework it into an article or book?

Some students worry that publishers will not publish a book or article that is based on a dissertation. First and foremost, you should consult with publishers (or published authors/ mentors) in your field if you have ideas about developing your work further and are concerned about this.

It’s important to remember that when a dissertation goes through the publication process, a lot of the information changes in some shape or form. In other words, it’s unlikely that a dissertation can be republished without major edits.  Dee Mortensen, Senior Sponsoring Editor at the IU Press, compares the relationship between a dissertation and a book to that of a chrysalis and a butterfly.

Because of the substantial alteration involved in the transformation of book to dissertation, it is often not an issue to make the original dissertation available. The study “Do Open Access Electronic Theses and Dissertations Diminish Publishing Opportunities in the Social Sciences and Humanities?” supports this claim, finding that most publishers (93% of university presses) do not consider a dissertation a prior publication that would disqualify the revised version from publication.

If you’re still concerned, remember that you can embargo your dissertation for up to five years in IUScholarWorks. An embargo would mean that readers can find information (sometimes called metadata) about your dissertation on the web but they would not be able to read the full-text of the work until a specified date.

IUSW staff are happy to discuss this option with you in more detail if you’re interested. Staff can also consult with authors about Creative Commons licensing and selecting the best license based on your goals for your work.

You can submit your thesis or dissertation  to IUSW here. A staff member will deposit it and respond to you with the link–it’s that simple!

You can also view all of this information in detail in a handy slide deck by our very own Sarah Hare (PDF link). If you are an advisor or faculty member and would like us to come to your class or event to talk to your students about dissertations, please e-mail us at iusw@indiana.edu.