Journal of Academic Advising Publishes Inaugural Issue

The Scholarly Communication department is excited to share that the Journal of Academic Advising (JAA), a recently launched open access publication, has published its first issue. This journal focuses on fostering interdisciplinary communication and collaboration between academic advising professionals through the publishing of research relating to different aspects of advising. The publication of the first issue coincides with NACADA’s annual national conference for academic advisors, where JAA editorial staff will participate in two special sessions: “Expanding Scholarship in Advising Through a New Journal” and “So You Want to be a Scholar: Fostering a Research Environment.”

Cover of Journal of Academic Advising's first issue

 

JAA’s inaugural issue focuses on sustainability and innovation in academic advising, a theme that is highlighted in Cheryl Wanko’s “Advising for Sustainability: A Challenge.” Wanko, an English professor and the chair of the Committee for Advising Excellence at West Chester University, asks how universities and advising can “cultivate more sustainable behaviors and life perspectives to help alter our culture’s self-destructive course” (p. 7), and how daily advising practices can promote awareness of environmental sustainability efforts. Kay S. Hamada, Assistant Specialist and Academic Advisor at the University of Hawai’i Mānoa, also contributed to JAA’s first issue with an article entitled “A Conceptual Framework for Disruptive Innovation in Advising.” Hamada discusses the various ways in which advancements in technology and other services necessitate changing how advising practices are approached. She terms this innovation as being “disruptive” because it often alters the theories and frameworks that have helped create existing practices.

The Journal of Academic Advising asks important questions about the impact that advisers and advising can have, outside of their traditional roles. JAA is completely open access, providing an audience for the content that may extend beyond the field of advising. The Scholarly Communication Department looks forward to the ideas and perspectives that this journal will bring to the table in further issues.

Summer Project Roundup

Campus may be deserted, but Scholarly Communication is working hard this summer to wrap up projects (and start some new ones) before the fall semester. Here are some of the things we’re looking forward to this summer:

  • Video training modules: Starting with some of our most frequently asked questions, we will be creating short explanatory modules that can be watched individually or linked together to create a training program for a system, concept, or policy.
  • Open Scholarship expansion: Our website, openscholarship.indiana.edu will be undergoing some changes to better reflect the work we are doing and provide some more content for our patrons. You can expect a new and improved workflow for depositing data into IUScholarWorks as well as information on creating and adopting Open Educational Resources.
  • Crossref Cited-by: We are exploring the possibility of participating in the Cited-by service, which would enable authors and readers who use our journal programs to discover who is citing the articles we publish.
  • Journal metrics: This summer we are working on a plan to share journal usage data with editorial teams. We hope to have a plan and template in place by September so that we can launch the service in fall.

If you have questions or would like to propose a project to the Scholarly Communication department, don’t hesitate to reach out by email (iusw@indiana.edu) or tweet us @iulibraries

What’s the Scholarly Communication Department Working On?

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Graduate Student Jenny Hoops.

This week, the Scholarly Communication Department has been hard at work preparing for the upgrade to our new publishing platform, Open Journals Systems 3 (OJS 3). Our priorities have included providing outreach for our journal editors and managers, integrating IU branding and accessibility information, and creating a consistent design for the overall website while allowing each journal to maintain a unique aesthetic.

The department offered three training sessions for journal managers and editors over the course of last week. These sessions highlighted the differences between the OJS 2 and OJS 3, emphasizing the streamlined process of submission management and the various technological improvements.

Image 1: Screenshot of the design and navigation improvements in OJS 3

Attendees were also able to see OJS 3 in action for the first time, as the training included a demo of the editorial workflow and a general overview of settings and features. While one of these workshops was available via Zoom in order to access editors not able to travel to IU, the two in-person sessions will include a series of hands-on activities in a test space of OJS 3.

Image 2: Photo of Sarah Hare teaching an OJS training session

For those editorial teams unable to attend one of the training sessions, the following resources will be of interest:

Image 3: Timeline of OJS 3 launch

On April 5, we will be enacting a freeze on all of our journal content in order to facilitate final implementation of OJS 3. Users will be unable to submit new articles, engage in any editorial activity, or publish any issues during these four days, but articles will still be accessible for the general public. By April 9, OJS 3 will go live, and full functionality of both journal websites and the editorial workflow will be reinstated. If you have any questions about this timeline, training sessions, or OJS 3 generally, contact iusw@indiana.edu.

OSP and IU Open Journals: FAQ

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department Graduate Student Jenny Hoops. 

Founded in 2012 by Indiana University Provost Lauren Robel, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) is a collaboration between IU Press and the scholarly publishing activities at IU Libraries aimed at furthering the enterprise of scholarly publishing at IU and beyond. Within the OSP, IU Press members provide invaluable expertise in journal production, copyediting, and marketing, alongside IU Libraries representatives, who provide consultation on intellectual property matters, digital preservation of scholarly research, public outreach for publishing initiatives across campus, and encourage the utilization of open access publishing models. The Office of Scholarly Publishing serves as an essential venue for the publishing activities of faculty, students, and staff of Indiana University.

With the current migration to the latest Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3 update—the online journals hosting platform for IUScholarWorks and IU Press journals—we continue to receive questions about the Office of Scholarly Publishing and the services it provides. We hope to clarify these below, as well as offer information to those who are interested in the suite of  publishing services available to OSP journals and partners.  

What kind of content does the Office of Scholarly Publishing handle?

The Office of Scholarly Publishing primarily deals with open access journal content, but OSP representatives are available to consult with IU faculty and staff about the publication of other kinds of scholarly materials. Last fall, the OSP helped Kelley School of Business instructors create four different eTexts for their courses using the PressBooks platform, for example. Anyone affiliated with IU that is interested in open access publishing is encouraged to contact the OSP to discuss their project in more detail.

What is the difference between IU Open Journals and Office of Scholarly Publishing journals?

Both IU Open Journals and OSP journals utilize Open Journal Systems, an online journal publishing platform developed by the Public Knowledge Project. The IU Open Journals program offers a digital publishing platform for any editorial team associated with Indiana University. There are minimal restrictions to becoming an IU Open Journal as only an affiliation with IU and a regular publication schedule are necessary. Peer review is not required, and pieces of work not often found in academic journals—such as memos or experimental art/poetry—can find a place of publication with this program. Our IU Open Journal service is an excellent place for any serial publication, including more non-traditional forms of scholarship, to receive support and hosting in order to make publication possible.

In contrast, Office of Scholarly Publishing journals are a select set of journals that are more academically rigorous, usually exclusively faculty peer-reviewed and faculty-authored publications.  The OSP will assess journal candidates to determine if a new journal is a potential OSP journal. If it is, it will be supported by the OSP while IU Open Journals will receive support from IUScholarWorks and the Scholarly Communication Department at IU Libraries.

What services does the Office of Scholarly Publishing offer?

The Office of Scholarly Publishing offers assistance with new journal setup, editorial team education for journal workflow and website management, technical support with Open Journal Systems (OJS) software, increased user access and discoverability thorough indexing and metrics, and digital preservation of online content. OSP brokers copyediting, typesetting,  and on-demand printing services and its staff are able to consult with editorial teams on marketing and design needs.

I’m in interested in starting a new publication with Indiana University. How do I start this process?

Contact iusw@indiana.edu to start set-up for a potential new journal. We will work with you to figure out whether or not your publication should be supported by IU Open Journals or the Office of Scholarly Publishing, and then provide you with outreach and technical support for Open Journal Systems.

The Office of Scholarly Publishing Welcomes Newest Version of Open Journal Systems

The IU Office of Scholarly Publishing is working on a lot of exciting projects this summer. One of those projects is planning its rollout of Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3. The Public Knowledge Project announced the release of OJS 3 last summer and they have been continually updating and improving the open source journals publishing software since the upgrade. The latest version of OJS offers more robust functionality and several new features, making it a major enhancement to the platform we currently provide to over 30 journals. We hope to migrate all of our journals to OJS 3 by spring 2018.

We believe that the new upgrade will make editors’ work more straightforward and will streamline the editorial processes from article submission through final publication. In addition to offering a more flexible interface for customizing each journal’s homepage, OJS 3 enables editors to easily tailor the editorial workflow to their journal’s specific needs and processes. OJS 3 was developed after extensive usability testing with both authors and editors and, as a result, the new system provides more flexible permissions and less restrictive author registration requirements.

OJS 3 will also include a plugin gallery, with new and updated plugins to improve our assessment of journals and DOI registration process. One of the most exciting plugins that OJS 3 will offer is Open Typesetting Stack (OTS). OTS will enable editors to publish their journals in full-text HTML as well as PDF. The plugin will make each journal’s born-digital content more readily accessible to all readers while enhancing the archiving and preservation of its content. We are excited about this new functionality, as it will enable us to integrate multimedia, 3D objects, and other innovative forms of scholarship into our publications.

We recognize that our editors will need personalized support as they learn to use and customize OJS 3 to fit their editorial needs. We plan to meet with each journal individually before next spring to discuss the migration timeline in depth and provide each editorial team with one-on-one training. We are committed to making sure that all content is migrated correctly and efficiently. In addition, we plan to customize PKP’s extensive documentation to our specific OJS instance and our editors’ needs.

The Public Knowledge Project has created an OJS 3 demonstration journal for your perusal. We encourage you to explore OJS 3 in more depth and send any questions you may have about the migration or the new platform to iusw@indiana.edu. If you aren’t one of our current editors but are still interested in launching or moving a journal to the new OJS platform, please contact us. The Office of Scholarly Publishing is excited to work with editors on this important update.

Introducing Office of Scholarly Publishing Journals

Image 1: IUScholarWorks Journals main pageThe way Open Access journals publishing is done on campus is about to become even more rewarding—and exciting. Select OA journals based at Indiana University will have the option of benefitting from enhanced publishing services through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP). The OSP was established by Indiana University Provost Lauren Robel in 2012 as a single-service campus publishing resource that draws upon the expertise and capabilities of IU Libraries and IU Press. Since 2009, the IU Libraries have facilitated the publishing of open access journals with the IUScholarWorks journals service. Among other services, the Libraries have provided technical support, performed platform maintenance and upgrades, and migrated content into the Public Knowledge Project’s Open Journal Systems platform at no charge.

Now, through the Office of Scholarly Publishing, those services can expand, still at no charge, for those campus OA journals whose operations are consistent with professionally-published scholarly journals. Drawing upon IU Press expertise in production, copyediting, indexing, and marketing, the OA journals selected will have the option of receiving an array of expanded publishing services. These include worldwide promotion alongside IU Press scholarly journals; copyediting, design, and layout; indexing; print-on-demand and fulfillment; e-reader editions; and additional revenue through print and online advertising sales. Representatives from IU Libraries and IU Press have begun meeting with journal editors to determine how the expanded services of the Office of Scholarly Publishing would be able to help support their particular areas of need.

This expanded-service journals program is the first phase of the rollout of the Office of Scholarly Publishing’s comprehensive suite of publishing services for the IU community. In the coming months, those services will continue to grow, including the development of new websites from IU Press and the OSP that will contain robust, interactive author interfaces as well as a host of vital information and publishing options for campus authors and editors.

For more information, contact:

Nicholas Homenda, interim Scholarly Communication Librarian

Michael Regoli, Director of Electronic and Journals Publishing, IU Press

New Monographic Series Launched in IUScholarWorks: Ethnomusicology Translations

IUScholarWorks is excited to announce the launch of Ethnomusicology Translations, a new monographic series that publishes ethnomusicological literature translated into English.  I interviewed Steve Stuempfle, Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations, about his experiences initiating this online publication series and he graciously answered a few of my questions:

Erica Hayes: What is Ethnomusicology Translations and how did it get started?

Steve Stuempfle:  Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer-reviewed, open-access online series for the publication of ethnomusicological literature translated into English. The series is published by the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), an organization founded in 1955 to promote research and study of all forms of music and their cultural contexts. For several years, the SEM membership has been calling for increased access to ethnomusicological scholarship across language barriers. We assembled an editorial team to pursue this endeavor and, thanks to a partnership with Indiana University Libraries, obtained a publishing platform. Our hope is that the new publication will be read not only by ethnomusicologists but by scholars from other fields and by anyone with an interest in music around the world.

How long have you been involved with Ethnomusicology Translations and in what capacity?

I have been working on translations initiatives at SEM since joining the organization as Executive Director in 2008. Over the past couple of years, I have been serving as Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations. My job is to address publication logistics, while the editorial team handles content.

Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer reviewed, open access online series. What made you adopt an open access model for this publication series and partner with IU Libraries?

We adopted an open-access model in order to reach as wide an audience as possible. A fundraising campaign at SEM has provided monies for translating, while our editorial team is volunteering their time. We partnered with Indiana University Libraries because of its success in offering quality scholarly publications through IUScholarWorks.

Who can nominate articles for inclusion in Ethnomusicology Translations and what is the nomination process?

Anyone can nominate an article to Ethnomusicology Translations by emailing General Editor Richard Wolf at rwolf@fas.harvard.edu. For brief nomination guidelines, see http://www.ethnomusicology.org/?Pub_EthnoTrans. Accepted nominations are assigned to a manuscript editor and then to a translator.

What are your plans for Ethnomusicology Translations over the next few years?

Our goal for the next few years is to publish translations of important ethnomusicological articles from a wide range of languages. Since Ethnomusicological Translations is a monograph series, rather than a journal, translated articles can be published at any time—as soon as they have gone through the peer review and editorial process. Each issue of Ethnomusicology Translation is a single article.

IUScholarWorks Welcomes Primary Source

I am pleased to announce the launch of a new student publication in IUScholarWorks: Primary Source: The Undergraduate Journal of History at Indiana University. The journal was previously published on a standalone website until Vianna Newman, current editor-in-chief, initiated the transition to IUScholarWorks in fall 2014. In the following interview, Newman shares some of her experiences as the editor of an undergraduate publication and the journal’s move to IUScholarWorks:

Shayna Pekala: Tell me a little about Primary Source.

Vianna Newman: A group of undergraduate history students founded Primary Source in the spring of 2011. They wanted to give undergraduates around Indiana and the Big 10 the opportunity to publish their work, which is pretty rare for undergrads. We publish an issue every semester with articles on a wide range of historical topics. The journal has been in its second generation – with none of the original members still on staff – since spring of last year.

How long have you been involved with the journal and in what capacity?

I joined the journal as an editor in January of 2012, and became editor-in-chief in August 2013.

Why did you decide to migrate the journal to IUScholarWorks?

I realized IUScholarWorks would help us with the editing process, specifically in keeping track of our edits and facilitating communication between editors, authors, and myself. Also, since IUScholarWorks hosts so many other journals, I know the website will be a good long-term home for the journal, more so than our previous one. The association with the other journals will also, I hope, increase awareness and readership of Primary Source.

How has the journal benefited since the move to IUScholarWorks?

I’ve been able to keep closer tabs on the progress that’s being made, and it’s been easier to look at and compare edits at various stages. I’ve been more in touch with how the editors are doing, which helps smooth the process.

What do you find most challenging/rewarding about being a journal editor?

The most challenging thing is keeping all the balls in the air. Every semester I’ve worked with anywhere from four to eight editors and five to seven authors. The most rewarding thing is being able to present these students’ great work to the world, even better than when they sent it to us, and knowing that you’ve helped turn something from an essay for a class into a published piece of scholarship.

What advice do you have for students who are interested in becoming involved with the editorial functions of a journal?

Find an existing student publication that really grabs your interest, for example Primary Source if you’re into history, and apply for an editorial position. Or start such a publication if there isn’t one! There are other university journals as well that will take on students as assistants and interns. But in order to secure such a position, the most important thing is to be a skilled writer and to have some experience with peer editing, or tutoring, or helping others with writing in any way.

What advice do you have for authors who are interested in submitting an article to Primary Source?

History is a very broad subject, and we encourage breadth in submission topics! In addition to well-written papers, we are looking for a good amount of analysis, and not just summarization of facts. Authors should take the time to make sure they’ve really developed a good argument. We receive a lot of papers that have great ideas or start well, but don’t quite go as far as we’d like them to. Finally, if authors have any questions, they shouldn’t hesitate to email at primary@indiana.edu.

XML Publishing in OJS

Journal publishers are increasingly using XML to improve the discoverability and long-term accessibility of their content. At IUB Libraries, the Digital Collection Services and Scholarly Communication departments have helped two open access journals, Indiana Magazine of History and The Medieval Review, establish and maintain XML workflows. Recently, we migrated one of these journals (and are in the process of migrating the other) to our Open Journal Systems (OJS) platform and have been using the XML galley plugin to streamline the XML publishing process. My colleague Nick Homenda and I presented on these efforts last week as part of the Digital Library Brown Bag Series. A recording of the presentation is available here: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/19773.

If you edit an open access journal at IUB and are interested in integrating XML into your workflows, please contact us – we’d love to work with you!

Reflections on 2014 and What’s to Come in 2015

With 21 journals and over 11,000 digital items published in its own iterations of Open Journal Systems (OJS) and DSpace, respectively, IUScholarWorks (IUSW) has led a crusade to cultivate the progression of erudition through the preservation and diffusion of academic studies conducted by the scholars of Indiana University.

In 2014, IUSW built new services and partnerships, and continued to strengthen its existing programming. Early in the year, IUSW introduced the option for editors and authors to obtain Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for works in both OJS and DSpace. Collaborations with the Avalon Media System team enabled IUSW to streamline the process for integrating multimedia into journal publications through the use of the Avalon Media Player. During the internationally celebrated Open Access Week in October, representatives from across the Libraries, IU Press, and the School of Informatics and Computing led discussions on topics related to open access and the scholarly publishing enterprise, including author’s rights, data management, and electronic publishing platforms.

IUSW has high hopes for what it will be able to accomplish during 2015, especially in regard to expanding its services. In response to requests from journal editors, IUSW has been working with the IU Press to be able to provide supplemental print copies of online journal issues. IUSW also aims to extend the ability to add Altmetric badges to journal articles in OJS, which is currently implemented in DSpace. Finally, IUSW will continue testing software solutions for an open access approach to conference management. With a successful beta run by the Indiana University Undergraduate Research Conference (IUURC20), IUSW hopes to be formally offering this service in the near future. Check back on the blog for reports on our progress!

To learn more about all things open access, feel free to stop by the consultation rooms in the Scholars’ Commons on Wednesdays 3-5pm to ask Shayna Pekala any questions you may have. Check out another open access project IUSW is working on: OpenFolklore.