A Recap of Open Access Week 2017

This is the tenth year Open Access Week has been celebrated. Each year, we celebrate a different piece of Open Access and its importance. For 2017, the emphasis was on “Open in Order to…” and the tangible benefits that scholars and institutions reap when research is openly available. The Open Access Week site lists several responses for the “Open in Order to…” prompt including “increase access to knowledge,” “facilitate collaboration,” and “raise your research visibility.”

At IU Libraries, we facilitated and promoted several programs that aligned with this year’s emphasis on the tangible results of OA. Staff from the Scholarly Communication Department, Teaching and Learning, Indiana University Press, the Institute for Digital Arts and Humanities (IDAH), and the Mathers Museum of World Cultures created and led these programs.

The “What Does Google Tell the World About You?” session focused on how openness can impact online presence and increase discoverability.  Our workshop entitled “Predatory Publishers, Open Scholarship, and Your Research” provided an overview of predatory publishing practices and strategies for finding a reputable publisher. “How Does Scholarly Peer-Review for Publication Work? An Introduction for Journals and Books” gave participants a practical, behind-the-scenes look at scholarly peer-review for journals as well as books. Additionally, as an extension of OA week, an info-share and group consultation on the new Open Access Digital Monograph Publishing Program will happen this Tuesday, 10/31. The program supports the publication of open-access monographs in the humanities and humanistic social sciences with a $15,000 subvention.

Finally, Indiana University Press made five IU faculty-authored books published freely available on the IUScholarworks platform from October 20 through October 27. The titles included Dealing with Dictators by Lazlo Borhi, Folk Art and Aging by Jon Kay, Abidjan USA by Daniel Reed, The Accompaniment in “Unaccompanied” Bach by Stanley Ritchie, and Guide to the Solo Horn Repertoire by Richard Seraphinoff.

OA week display case with open press books
The Open Access Week Display Case In Wells Lobby, Featuring some of the IU Press books made openly available 10/20-10/27

The “opening up” of these titles coincided with the annual IU Press Authors Event, which celebrates IUB faculty that have published a monograph in the last year. Authors were congratulated by Dean Walters, Provost Robel, and Vice Provost Van Kooten.

books publishing by IU faculty
A selection of the monographs published by IU faculty in the last year

Our focus for Open Access Week 2017 was to highlight the tangible, practical side of Open Access. Open Access increases impact, provides content to all, and is compatible with reputable and rigorous publishing. Our events this year dispelled common OA myths while highlighting these truths and emphasizing OA’s impact on the IU community specifically.

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Empathetic Classroom

This post was written by the Scholarly Communication Department’s graduate assistant, Jenny Hoops. 

This is our second post in a series that aims to highlight and showcase interesting, integral, and open scholarship at Indiana University. The Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and Indiana University Press, continues to facilitate the creation and preservation of open and accessible scholarship through the Open Journal Systems (OJS) publishing platform. Through OJS, the OSP has helped numerous editorial teams publish over a dozen open access journal titles on a variety of subjects. One of the Office of Scholarly Publishing’s most widely-read titles, Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL), demonstrates the impact that open access research can have.

The Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL) has been dedicated to the publication of research examining contemporary problems, both practical and theoretical, in the teaching of higher education since its first publication in 2001. JoSoTL includes countless articles, essays, critiques, literature reviews, and case studies, authored by scholars around the globe. JoSoTL is indexed by several integral education databases including ERIC, Education Source, and Education Research Complete. All of JoSoTL’s journal content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s editor-in-chief is Michael Morrone, lecturer in IU’s Kelley School of Business and director of the Faculty Colloquium on Excellence in Teaching (FACET).

One example of the quality of work that JoSoTL publishes is the article “Managing Student Self-Disclosure in Class Settings: Lessons from Feminist Pedagogy,” a piece from this year’s first issue of JoSoTL. The article is authored by IU South Bend’s Catherine Borshuk, a social psychologist and Director of the University’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program. Borshuk engages with a rising issue in higher education classrooms, particularly within the humanities and social sciences: the need to balance empathy with professionalism. The old feminist ideal “the personal is political” has entered the college classroom in unexpected ways, as students, encouraged by patterns developed from social media, feel more willing to share highly personal and occasionally upsetting anecdotes related (or sometimes not) to classroom lectures and topics. Borshuk argues that this impulse to share and create a more understanding classroom must be met with measured compassion, and attempts to foster empathy while still maintaining academic discipline and ethics are key.

After a review of the problem and its theoretical background, Borshuk offers potential solutions for this challenging task. She suggests several initial strategies for teachers engaging with her work: avoiding “othering” students by avoiding assumptions about student backgrounds and experiences and using the pronoun “we” rather than “they” or “them”; building diverse materials and subjects into class readings; and finally, focusing on societal and institutional narratives rather solely the personal (pgs. 80-82). Borshuk concludes with her own experiences of utilizing such techniques and encourages other educators to engage with feminist pedagogy to solve issues of student disclosure. Work such as this article provides philosophical explanations for educational issues while also beginning discussion on how to solve such problems to benefit both the teacher and the student.

The improvement of education relies on communication and collaboration between instructors. Further, in order to develop the best educational techniques, instructors must learn from mistakes and elaborate on successes. The Office of Scholarly Publishing is excited to assist JoSoTL in their work to improve both instruction and education.

The Office of Scholarly Publishing Welcomes Newest Version of Open Journal Systems

The IU Office of Scholarly Publishing is working on a lot of exciting projects this summer. One of those projects is planning its rollout of Open Journal Systems (OJS) 3. The Public Knowledge Project announced the release of OJS 3 last summer and they have been continually updating and improving the open source journals publishing software since the upgrade. The latest version of OJS offers more robust functionality and several new features, making it a major enhancement to the platform we currently provide to over 30 journals. We hope to migrate all of our journals to OJS 3 by spring 2018.

We believe that the new upgrade will make editors’ work more straightforward and will streamline the editorial processes from article submission through final publication. In addition to offering a more flexible interface for customizing each journal’s homepage, OJS 3 enables editors to easily tailor the editorial workflow to their journal’s specific needs and processes. OJS 3 was developed after extensive usability testing with both authors and editors and, as a result, the new system provides more flexible permissions and less restrictive author registration requirements.

OJS 3 will also include a plugin gallery, with new and updated plugins to improve our assessment of journals and DOI registration process. One of the most exciting plugins that OJS 3 will offer is Open Typesetting Stack (OTS). OTS will enable editors to publish their journals in full-text HTML as well as PDF. The plugin will make each journal’s born-digital content more readily accessible to all readers while enhancing the archiving and preservation of its content. We are excited about this new functionality, as it will enable us to integrate multimedia, 3D objects, and other innovative forms of scholarship into our publications.

We recognize that our editors will need personalized support as they learn to use and customize OJS 3 to fit their editorial needs. We plan to meet with each journal individually before next spring to discuss the migration timeline in depth and provide each editorial team with one-on-one training. We are committed to making sure that all content is migrated correctly and efficiently. In addition, we plan to customize PKP’s extensive documentation to our specific OJS instance and our editors’ needs.

The Public Knowledge Project has created an OJS 3 demonstration journal for your perusal. We encourage you to explore OJS 3 in more depth and send any questions you may have about the migration or the new platform to iusw@indiana.edu. If you aren’t one of our current editors but are still interested in launching or moving a journal to the new OJS platform, please contact us. The Office of Scholarly Publishing is excited to work with editors on this important update.

Upcoming Workshop: Maximizing Your Research Impact

An Overview of Scholarly Metrics

The Scholarly Communication Department will be presenting a Scholars’ Commons workshop on maximizing research impact and the range of scholarly metrics now available to researchers.

March 29th 2016 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Hazelbaker Hall (E159)

The workshop will provide an overview and introduction to how traditional and nontraditional scholarly metrics, such as Journal Impact Factor, h-index, ImpactStory, and Altmetrics are being used to gather evidence and demonstrate potential value and research impact during promotion and tenure proceedings. Participants will learn the importance of unique author identifiers including ORCID and Researcher ID, and discuss relevant issues such as choosing a journal for your research, open access, and using scholarly networking tools. Academics from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. Bring a brown bag lunch and join us!

Presented by Erica Hayes & Richard Higgins. Register for the workshop here.

New website and new interim ScholComm librarian

The Scholarly Communication department and the IUScholarWorks staff are pleased to announce that our new, completely redesigned website is live and available to the public. The URL hasn’t changed (scholarworks.iu.edu), but we’ve added new convenient ways to contact us, submit material to IUScholarWorks, and find answers about our services.

We are also pleased to welcome Nicholas Homenda to the department. Nick, who is Digital Initiatives Librarian in the Digital Collections Services Department, will also serve as Interim Scholarly Communications Librarian. Nick is a welcome and familiar contributor to scholarly communication initiatives in the Libraries.

Shayna Pekala, who contributed to some of our most successful digital initiatives as a student and Visiting Scholarly Communication Librarian over the past several years, is heading  to Washington, DC to become the Discovery Librarian at Georgetown University. Shayna was largely responsible for the planning and implementation of our new website, which went live during her very last week with us.

 

Spring 2016 Copyright & Publishing Workshops Are Here!

We are thrilled to announce our lineup of Copyright & Publishing workshops for Spring 2016. Join the Scholarly Communication team and our colleagues in the Libraries, the IU Press, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to learn about copyright for visual artists, creating a research poster, scholarly metrics, and more!

Schedule of copyright and publishing workshops

Scholarly Communication Consultation Schedule for Spring 2016

This spring staff members from the Scholarly Communication department will once again be holding consultation sessions in the Scholars’ Commons. Naz will hold consultation hours once a week for issues related to copyright and intellectual property. And once per month, Shayna and Richard will be available to answer questions about using the IUScholarWorks institutional repository and the Open Journal System. Our hours for the Spring semester are as follows:

Copyright Information Services
Presented by Naz Pantaloni​
Friday, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm in room 157R

Open Access Publishing
Presented by Shayna Pekala & Richard Higgins
Second Thursday of each month, 2:00 pm – 3:00pm in room 157R
Jan 14, Feb 11, Mar 10, Apr 14

The Scholars Commons is located on the first floor of the East Tower at the Herman B Wells Library. These are drop-in hours, so no appointment is necessary.

Open Access Week 2015

It’s that time of year again!  On October 19th-23rd, IU Bloomington will celebrate Open Access Week 2015.  Open Access Week is a great opportunity for students, faculty, and librarians to learn more about the potential benefits of open access scholarship and research.  In lieu of this year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration,” IU Bloomington has put together a great series of workshops with speakers from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research, Indiana University Press, and the IU Libraries.  Topics of discussion will include data management, academic publishing for early-career researchers, journal publishing agreements, and more.  All are encouraged to attend and learn from each other!

See below for a detailed list of workshops to be held during Open Access Week 2015:

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Wells W144 | 3pm-4pm
Open Lab: IUScholarWorks

  • Shayna Pekala and Richard Higgins, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Wells E159 | 3pm-4pm
What You Need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Wells E159 | 12pm-1pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

 Friday, October 23, 2015 | Wells E158 | 11am-1pm
Data Management 101 (Lunch included)

  • Heather Coates, Michelle Dalmau, and Jennifer Laherty, Indiana University Libraries
  • Tassie Gniady and Sofia McDowell, Office of Research Compliance
  • Kristy Kallback-Rose, UITS Research Technologies
  • Jennifer Guiliano, Department of History, IUPUI
  • Kalani Craig, Department of History, IUB

Fall 2015 Academic Publishing Workshop Series

The Office of Scholarly Publishing will be hosting a series of Academic Publishing workshops this fall semester.  Topics of discussion will include how to navigate the world of academic publishing, book proposal writing, journal publishing agreements, and preparing a scholarly journal.  Faculty and students planning to publish their research are encouraged to attend!

You may sign up for any of the following workshops and view the complete schedule, including abstracts at http://iub.libcal.com/

Here is the list of workshops being offered:

Monday, September 28, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 1:00pm-2:00pm
How to Write a Book Proposal

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press

Monday, October 5, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 1pm-2pm
How to Start a Scholarly Journal

  • Shayna Pekala, Indiana University Libraries
  • Michael Regoli, Indiana University Press

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ-Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Psychological & Brain Sciences Faculty

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 3pm-4pm
What You need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 12pm-1:30pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 10:30am-12:00pm
Copyright, Fair Use, and Permissions (for Journal Editors)

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Shareability vs. open access: A summary of the contention around Elsevier’s new sharing policy

Less than a month after the academic publisher Elsevier’s director of access and policy Dr. Alicia Wise posted the company’s new policies for sharing and hosting academic articles at every stage and on every platform, the Coalition of Open Access Repositories (COAR) countered with a statement backed by more than 2,000 organizations and individuals across the globe criticizing Elsevier for creating a policy that “represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders’ open access policies,” which has sparked a very public back-and-forth with Dr. Alicia Wise.

COAR originally criticized Elsevier’s policy for masquerading as one to progress sharing capabilities, but instead working to accomplish the reverse. The policy forces embargoes of up to 48 months on some journals, requires authors to apply a “non-commercial and no derivative works” license for every article deposited into a repository, and applies to “all articles previously published and those published in the future.” The policy requires unacceptably long embargoes with 90% of the 286 journals having at least 12 month embargo period, reduces ‘re-use value’ of each article, and could put currently accessible articles under embargoes. The overall complaint was that the policy is a step in the exact opposite direction of the global movement towards open access, works to hinder any benefit of openly sharing research, and is posed as a solution for a policy that did not previously show any evidence of having a negative impact on publisher subscriptions.

Dr. Wise responded just a day later with a rebuttal that was aimed at clearing the air. The publishing company was “a little surprised that COAR has formed such a negative view and chosen not to feedback their concerns directly to us,” especially after Elsevier “received neutral-to-positive responses from research institutions and the wider research community” since the announcement of their new policy. Throughout the response article, Dr. Wise states that the embargo policies have been in place since or before 2004 when the last “refresh” came about and that the other changes have been made based on feedback by their authors and institutional partners. Many complaints in response to this rebuttal by commenters and COAR surround Elsevier’s lack of transparency about the feedback they received and the company’s use of share as a way to avoid the topic of true open access publishing.

COAR’s reply to Elsevier reiterates all of COAR’s original concerns, cites more evidence of the publishing company’s dance around being truly open access, and offers improvements that Elsevier can make to their policy:

  1. Elsevier should allow all authors to make their “author’s accepted manuscript” openly available immediately upon acceptance through an OA repository or other open access platform.
  2. Elsevier should allow authors to choose the type of open license (from CC-BY to other more restrictive licenses like the CC-BY-NC-ND) they want to attach to the content that they are depositing into an open access platform.
  3. Elsevier should not attempt to dictate author’s practices around individual sharing of articles. Individual sharing of journal articles is already a scholarly norm and is protected by fair use and other copyright exceptions. Elsevier cannot, and should not, dictate practices around individual sharing of articles.

The counter concludes with COAR offering to take Dr. Wise up on her ‘offer’ to meet with the company in order to help the publisher better understand what the research community desires, due to the many misperceptions that Elsevier believes are confusing the research community as to the real meaning of the new policy.