IUScholarWorks: Share and preserve your work in IU’s institutional repository

The IUScholarWorks repository is one of the open scholarship services at Indiana University Libraries.  It provides a platform to make the research, instructional tools, and creative activities of IU scholars freely available, while ensuring these resources are curated, discoverable and preserved for the future. Faculty and graduate students can freely deposit their work in IUScholarWorks. Undergraduate students who have faculty permission can also make their work digitally and freely available.

Whether you want to share your work with the university or the world, build a digital collection of your work in one place, or you need to share your work in order to comply with a grant, the repository supports sharing  a wide variety of materials, including:

You can also use IUScholarWorks to create a central space for published work e.g. related articles, questionnaires, manuals, underlying data, methodologies, presentations, protocols, and course syllabi.  Use our CV Service to do this, or create a research collection on IU ScholarWorks

Depositing your work in the IUScholarWorks repository makes your work more discoverable, easy to cite, and provides metrics on use.  Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work.  Each deposit is assigned a persistent URL such as a handle, or a DOI.  IUScholarWorks is indexed by major search engines, such as Google Scholar.  

Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work, regardless of whether they are associated with Indiana University.

You can link your work that is deposited in the institutional repository with your Google Scholar profile, or your ORCID record. Google Scholar profiles are one of the most common tools used by researchers to publicize and track their work, receive alerts about new citations, and gather metrics for promotion and  tenure dossiers.

ORCID is a unique identifier connecting you with your entire scholarly record, not just your publications. You can connect your ORCID with publications,  grant funding, organizations at which you have worked or studied, and other identifiers.

ORCID can automatically update this information if you choose to set up that option.  Having an ORCID increases the accuracy, transparency, and visibility of your scholarly record.

You can post the IUScholarWorks link for your work or collection to ORCID or on professional online communities and social media platforms such as personal or departmental blogs, LinkedIn, Twitter, or other social networking resources used by scholars. When posting to social network platforms, it’s a good idea to write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important.

Tip: Write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important, then post the summary and a link to the item in IUScholarWorks on the platform of your choice.

Remember that your affiliation with Indiana University or similar institutions affords you information privilege that others do not enjoy, by giving you a high level of access to “research material, including journal articles, data, and primary sources…. access to additional research support, faculty, and a peer network, [and] the opportunity to build upon existing research and enter the scholarly conversation”.

There are plenty of people who might need access to your studies–scholars from small institutionslow-income countriespatient advocatespatients themselvescitizen scientists, and members of the general public. Publishing open access will enable a wide range of persons to access and learn from your work.

Your work is worth sharing!  Register on IUScholarworks today (https://scholarworks.iu.edu/deposit) , and email iusw@indiana.edu for authorization to deposit your work in IUScholarWorks!

 

Upcoming Workshop: Maximizing Your Research Impact

An Overview of Scholarly Metrics

The Scholarly Communication Department will be presenting a Scholars’ Commons workshop on maximizing research impact and the range of scholarly metrics now available to researchers.

March 29th 2016 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Hazelbaker Hall (E159)

The workshop will provide an overview and introduction to how traditional and nontraditional scholarly metrics, such as Journal Impact Factor, h-index, ImpactStory, and Altmetrics are being used to gather evidence and demonstrate potential value and research impact during promotion and tenure proceedings. Participants will learn the importance of unique author identifiers including ORCID and Researcher ID, and discuss relevant issues such as choosing a journal for your research, open access, and using scholarly networking tools. Academics from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. Bring a brown bag lunch and join us!

Presented by Erica Hayes & Richard Higgins. Register for the workshop here.

New website and new interim ScholComm librarian

The Scholarly Communication department and the IUScholarWorks staff are pleased to announce that our new, completely redesigned website is live and available to the public. The URL hasn’t changed (scholarworks.iu.edu), but we’ve added new convenient ways to contact us, submit material to IUScholarWorks, and find answers about our services.

We are also pleased to welcome Nicholas Homenda to the department. Nick, who is Digital Initiatives Librarian in the Digital Collections Services Department, will also serve as Interim Scholarly Communications Librarian. Nick is a welcome and familiar contributor to scholarly communication initiatives in the Libraries.

Shayna Pekala, who contributed to some of our most successful digital initiatives as a student and Visiting Scholarly Communication Librarian over the past several years, is heading  to Washington, DC to become the Discovery Librarian at Georgetown University. Shayna was largely responsible for the planning and implementation of our new website, which went live during her very last week with us.

 

Spring 2016 Copyright & Publishing Workshops Are Here!

We are thrilled to announce our lineup of Copyright & Publishing workshops for Spring 2016. Join the Scholarly Communication team and our colleagues in the Libraries, the IU Press, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to learn about copyright for visual artists, creating a research poster, scholarly metrics, and more!

Schedule of copyright and publishing workshops

Reflections on 2014 and What’s to Come in 2015

With 21 journals and over 11,000 digital items published in its own iterations of Open Journal Systems (OJS) and DSpace, respectively, IUScholarWorks (IUSW) has led a crusade to cultivate the progression of erudition through the preservation and diffusion of academic studies conducted by the scholars of Indiana University.

In 2014, IUSW built new services and partnerships, and continued to strengthen its existing programming. Early in the year, IUSW introduced the option for editors and authors to obtain Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) for works in both OJS and DSpace. Collaborations with the Avalon Media System team enabled IUSW to streamline the process for integrating multimedia into journal publications through the use of the Avalon Media Player. During the internationally celebrated Open Access Week in October, representatives from across the Libraries, IU Press, and the School of Informatics and Computing led discussions on topics related to open access and the scholarly publishing enterprise, including author’s rights, data management, and electronic publishing platforms.

IUSW has high hopes for what it will be able to accomplish during 2015, especially in regard to expanding its services. In response to requests from journal editors, IUSW has been working with the IU Press to be able to provide supplemental print copies of online journal issues. IUSW also aims to extend the ability to add Altmetric badges to journal articles in OJS, which is currently implemented in DSpace. Finally, IUSW will continue testing software solutions for an open access approach to conference management. With a successful beta run by the Indiana University Undergraduate Research Conference (IUURC20), IUSW hopes to be formally offering this service in the near future. Check back on the blog for reports on our progress!

To learn more about all things open access, feel free to stop by the consultation rooms in the Scholars’ Commons on Wednesdays 3-5pm to ask Shayna Pekala any questions you may have. Check out another open access project IUSW is working on: OpenFolklore.

IUScholarWorks Journals: More than Just a Hosting Service

The IUScholarWorks journal service helps you, the prospective journal editor, publish your journal in open access. While IUScholarWorks does not identify as the publisher of any of the journals we support, we do so much more than simply host your content. Here are some of the services we provide:

  • Indexing – We’ll make sure your journal articles show up in Google and Google Scholar.
  • ISSN registration – We’ll apply for an International Standard Serial Number (ISSN) to uniquely identify your journal.
  • DOI registration – As a member of the DOI registration agency, CrossRef, we will help you assign and register Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) to uniquely identify your articles.
  • Editorial workflow management – We’ll train you how to use Open Journal Systems (OJS) software to effectively manage your editorial workflows.
  • Cataloging – We’ll create a record for your journal in IUCAT and WorldCat.
  • Content preservation – We are committed to maintaining the content of your journal in perpetuity, even if ownership of the journal moves outside of IU. All of our journals are archived with CLOCKSS.
  • Copyright & Licensing – We will work with you to draft your journal’s copyright policy and can advise on how to license outside content for reuse in your journal.
  • Multimedia content support – Want to include audio or video content alongside your journal articles? We’ll help you use the Avalon Media System to make this possible.
  • Usage statistics –We’ll provide annual reports on article views for your journal.

As you can see, IUScholarWorks strives to go above and beyond simply providing a home for your journal on our server. If you are thinking about starting a new journal, or are interested in migrating your current journal to an open access publishing platform, please contact us at iusw@indiana.edu.

Social media metrics for IUScholarWorks content now available

An example altmetric.com report for content hosted on IUScholarWorks
An example report of altmetrics related to Jason Baird Jackson’s “Anthropology of/in Circulation: The Future of Open Access and Scholarly Societies,” uploaded to IUScholarWorks

For those who want to track metrics for the broader impact of the scholarship they’ve uploaded to the IUScholarWorks repository, we are pleased to announce that altmetrics badges and reports (powered by Altmetric.com) are now available, in addition to usage statistics.

Altmetrics are  social media metrics related to any scholarly output–a journal article, a data set, a working paper, or even a slide deck presented at a conference. The Altmetric.com service currently reports altmetrics for any scholarly content that has a DOI, Handle, PubMed ID, or ArXiv ID.

How it works

On any item record in our repository to which an Altmetric.com badge has been added, you’ll see the badge appear in the bottom of the left-hand navigation bar, under the “Statistics” section. (See an example here.) Hovering over the badge with your cursor, you can see an abbreviated report of the social media attention that item has received, including tweets, scholarly blog posts, and social bookmarks on services like Mendeley. By clicking on the badge, you’ll be taken to a full report on Altmetric.com, which offers a drill-down view into your social media metrics and demographics of those who have tweeted about your work.

If you already have content on IUScholarWorks to which you want to add a badge, email your collection administrator or the IUScholarWorks team. For new content, you’ll be given the option to add a badge during the deposit process; pay careful attention when filling out information during your next deposit.

Badges are publicly displayed. There is not yet ‘depositor-only’ access to the altmetrics for your repository content. Depositors wishing to privately view altmetrics for their research on IUScholarWorks repository can subscribe to Altmetric.com’s paid service or sign up for a free ImpactStory account. (Full disclosure: I am a recent hire of ImpactStory.)

Not interested in altmetrics? That’s fine, too. Badges are by default hidden on all existing and new deposits. The service is opt-in by design.

Why we have implemented this service

In talking with regular users of our service, we’ve learned that faculty and graduate students are keen to track how their scholarship is being consumed and shared, within the Academy and beyond. This service will allow interested users to do so.

We believe that an altmetrics reporting service will help scholars to better understand the nuances of what it means to be “impactful” in an an increasingly networked research environment. Our service surfaces a greater variety of impact measures, and can help scholars understand and connect with new audiences.

On a final note, it is also important to bear in mind that relevant quantitative measures of impact differ from discipline to discipline, and that altmetrics as currently conceived (and reported by Altmetric.com) may not meet the needs of historians as well as they do for biologists. As the field matures, we expect to support and experiment with emerging services in our repository.

To learn more about Altmetric.com, visit their website. More information about our implementation of altmetrics and usage statistics in the IUScholarWorks repository can be found on our website.

17 More Essential Altmetrics Resources (the Library Version)

As promised, I have compiled some “required reading” related specifically to altmetrics and their use in libraries. These articles and blog posts actually comprise a majority of the writing out there on altmetrics in libraries–there’s surprisingly little that librarians have written to date on how our profession might use altmetrics to enhance our work.

Ironically enough (given librarians’ own OA advocacy), some of the articles linked below have been published in toll access library science journals. Apologies in advance for any paywalls you may encounter. (Though if you do find barriers to access, you should tell OA Button about it!)

General

Collection Development

Research Data Curation

  • Weber, N. M., Thomer, A. K., Mayernik, M. S., Dattore, B., Ji, Z., & Worley, S. (2013). The Product and System Specificities of Measuring Curation Impact. International Journal of Digital Curation, 8(2).  doi:10.2218/ijdc.v8i2.286

Institutional Repositories

  • Day, M., & Michael Day. (2004). Institutional repositories and research assessment. Project Report. UKOLN, University of Bath. (pp. 1–30). Bath: University of Bath. Retrieved from http://opus.bath.ac.uk/23308/
  • Frank Scholz, S. D. (2006). International Workshop on Institutional Repositories and Enhanced and Alternative Metrics of Publication Impact. CERN. Retrieved from http://edoc.hu-berlin.de/series/dini-schriften/2006-8/PDF/8.pdf
  • Konkiel, S., & Scherer, D. (2013). New opportunities for repositories in the age of altmetrics. Bulletin of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 39(4), 22–26. doi:10.1002/bult.2013.1720390408
  • Merceur, F., Gall, M. Le, Salaün, A., & Le Gall, M. (2011). Bibliometrics: a new feature for institutional repositories. In 14th Biennal EURASLIC Meeting (pp. 1–21). Lyon. Retrieved from http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00031/14253/11886.pdf
  • Organ, M. K. (2006). Download Statistics – What Do They Tell Us? The Example of Research Online, the Open Access Institutional Repository at the University of Wollongong, Australia. D-Lib Magazine. Retrieved February 13, 2012, from http://ro.uow.edu.au/asdpapers/44/

Do you have “must read” articles relating to libraries and altmetrics that didn’t make it on this list? Leave ’em in the comments below!

Want to read some general altmetrics-related research? Check out the original list of 17 Essential Altmetrics Resources.

17 Essential Altmetrics Resources

As the journal impact factor continues to be challenged by academics, many wonder what measures can take its place if it is indeed eradicated. Surely, we will have to continue to provide objective metrics that measure both the productivity and impact of scholars across the disciplines, won’t we? Some have posited that altmetrics (article-level metrics that measure impact across the social web) may be a good replacement for the impact factor; others contend that altmetrics can serve only as a supplement to existing, more traditional measures of research quality.

I have been asked several times by other librarians to compile a recommended reading list for those who wish to learn more about altmetrics. What I’ve created here is by no means comprehensive; instead, it is intended to be a starting point for further investigation into the field. By including several articles about the impact factor, as well as critiques of the use of research metrics and altmetrics to measure scholarship’s quality, I hope to provide a contextualized view into the field. I also include links to three web services (Altmetric.com, ImpactStory, and PLOS Article Level Metrics) that can be used to track altmetrics.

I’ll soon release a reading list scoped specifically for altmetrics used in the context of academic libraries. Stay tuned!

Statistics now available in the IUScholarWorks Repository

The IUScholarWorks Repository is now providing usage statistics for all items.  When viewing an item (such as:  http://hdl.handle.net/2022/3253), click on the link:  View Usage Statistics in the bottom left corner of the navigation column.  The data available includes:

  • total monthly views
  • downloads of the files attached to the records
  • information about visitors from geographies: countries and cities

Currently the data provided includes April 2012 to present.  We will soon incorporate the use data from 2006 to April 2012.  Downloading the data is a future feature we hope to develop and provide.

We are excited to bring this new service to the Repository.  Please contact us with any questions:  iusw@indiana.edu.