China Remixed: Ting Su, Doctor of Education, 1940

As part of China Remixed, a campus-wide initiative to celebrate Chinese culture, the Indiana University Archives is celebrating the long history of Chinese students at IU with a series of blog posts. This is the last post in this series. 

In 1937, Ting Su came to IU to pursue a doctoral degree in Education. He had previously earned a Bachelor’s in Education from Peiping National Normal University in China and came to the United States to study at Stanford University and Columbia University Teacher’s College in pursuit of a master’s in Education.

While at IU, Su was active in the Cosmopolitan Club and served as an assistant instructor. After submitting his dissertation titled A functional program of organization and administration for the public schools of Suiyuan Province, China,  he graduated with his Doctorate of Education in 1940. He spent the year following his graduation traveling the state of Indiana giving lectures on Chinese affairs. In July 1941, Su returned to China to serve as a professor of Education in the Teachers’ College of Sun Yat-sen University at

April 5, 1951, The Terre Haute Tribune: “China is the vanguard against Communist world aggression.”

Ping-shek. Su gave 15 speeches to schools and clubs in Hong Kong about the American way of life.

He returned to IU in 1950 and served as a Research Assistant in Area Studies and part-time instructor in Education until June 1951. During this period, Su served as one of an eight-member investigation mission of the Political Consultive Conference established at the suggestion of General George Marshall to investigate the military disputes between the US government and the Communists.

Upon leaving IU, Su taught Chinese-Mandarin Language along with advanced courses in Chinese-Mandarin History, Geography, Engineering Technology, and Military Terminology at the Army Language School at Monterey, California. In this role, he taught Mandarin to Army and Air Force personnel. In 1956, the rise of communism in China led to increased scrutiny of Chinese citizens living in the United States, particularly on the West Coast.

Letter to Ting Su from Herman B Wells: “Several of these congressmen are good and loyal personal friends of mine and I am sure they will leave no stone unturned in your case.”

When Su was threatened with deportation, he wrote to Herman B Wells for support of Bill HR11228, a bill introduced by Congressman Teague of California to prevent deportation of Dr. Su and his wife, Grace Yu Ying Ling. At that time, he lived in Seaside, California with his wife and two children. President Wells wrote letters to six Indiana congressional representatives to resolve the deportation threat.

Letter from Indiana Representative Earl Wilson to Herman B Wells supporting a bill to prevent the deportation of Dr. Ting Su and his wife, Grace Yu Ying.

Based on correspondence past 1956, it seems that alumnus Dr. Ting Su and his family avoided wrongful deportation and remained in California.

In 1988 “The World’s Greatest College Weekend” Got Even Better

Little 500, May 12, 1951. IU Archives image no. P0057566

The Little 500 began in 1951 and students throughout campus were involved from the beginning. Women, however, were excluded from full participation for nearly 40 years. While they could participate in the Mini 500 trike race, women wanted an equal spotlight during “The World’s Greatest College Weekend.” In early 1980s, then-Dean of Women’s Affairs, Phyllis Klotman, proposed a separate women’s race after hearing talk of female students being unhappy because they felt like they were not a true part of Little 500. After Dean Klotman’s proposal, the planning took six years, but with a lot of persistence, the first race finally happened in 1988.

“We want women to know that if they have the motivation to do it, the opportunity and support is here for them.”

The rules for team building were the same as the men’s race: Only one Greek team per house, and the residence halls can have multiple teams, but they must be from different floors. The women’s race was half the length of the men’s: 100 laps (25 miles) as compared to the men’s 200 laps. And just to keep things fair, men were introduced to the Mini 500, which had been intended strictly for women.

For that first year, 37 teams were interested, but rules stated 33 teams were the maximum number allowed to race. It all worked out, as on race day, 30 women’s teams ended up competing. More than 11,000 spectators turned out to see the first-ever women’s race, a much larger turnout than projected. The top five finishing teams that year were:

  1. Willkie Sprint
  2. Kappa Alpha Theta
  3. Delta Delta Delta
  4. Alpha Epsilon Phi
  5. Notorious

The winning women’s team in 1988, Willkie Sprint, finished with a time of 1 hour, 10 minutes, 52 seconds, which averages out to a speed of 21.57 mph.

The Women’s council president for the 1988 Women’s 500, Sandi Miller, had some encouraging words for the women involved in the race, “We want women to know that if they have the motivation to do it, the opportunity and support is here for them.”

 

Women’s Little 500 is still as popular as ever and while there has been an annual race since 1988, Willkie Sprint’s time remains the fourth highest recorded. Today at 4:30 history will record the 30th Women’s Little 500.

Contact the IU Archives to learn more about the history of the Little 500, and view photographs of past women’s races here in the Archives Photograph Collection. We have also partnered with our colleagues in the IU Libraries Moving Image Archive to begin digitization of Little 500 films in our holdings! Visit Media Collections Online to see what is currently available and stay tuned for more!

China Remixed: Showin Wetzen Hsu, BA 1909

As part of China Remixed, a campus-wide initiative to celebrate Chinese culture, the Indiana University Archives is celebrating the long history of Chinese students at IU with a series of blog posts and an exhibit in the lobby of the Wells Library.

Showin Wetzen Hsu, 1930

Showin Wetzen Hsu was the first Chinese student to graduate from Indiana University, earning a Bachelor’s Degree in History in 1909. Hsu came to the US in 1905 and studied at the University of California until the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fire compelled university officials to end the academic year early. He transferred to the University of Illinois, where he stayed for 2 years, but decided to continue his studies IU in 1908 to specialize in Political Science, International Law, and Diplomacy under professors he admired.

Showin Wetzen Hsu’s War Service Record detailing his judicial service in China until 1919

Shortly after graduation, in 1909, Hsu was recalled to China to serve as a law compiler in the Councilor’s department. Hsu rose through the ranks of the Chinese government quickly between 1911 and 1930. Hsu earned a master’s degree in 1911 and was appointed secretary of the Ministry of Education.  In 1912, Hsu was involved in transitioning the Chinese government from an imperial dynasty to a republic after the fall of the Qing Dynasty, a group that held power for more than 250 years. In 1912, the president of the newly established Republic of China appointed Hsu to serve as a justice of the Supreme Court of China. Hsu served in many high-level governmental and judicial capacities during his long career.

Letter from Showin Wetzen Hsu to President William Lowe Bryan, November 20, 1916 written on stationary from the Supreme Court of China

Hsu fondly remembered his time at IU even after his return to China. He corresponded with President William Lowe Bryan, donated money to IU causes, and frequently communicated with the IU Alumni Office. In October 1909, Hsu wrote a letter to William Lowe Bryan stating, “For the last whole academic year, I enjoyed my work in your university very much. I have been always proud of being the first Chinese graduate in Indiana and in the near future if I should be able enough to do any thing for my country is of course all due to your great supervision of our alma mater.” In January 1916, Hsu wrote to the Alumni Office to say that, although there were not enough IU graduates in Peking to hold a Foundation Day reunion, his thoughts were with his alma mater.

Pages four and five of letter from Showin Wetzen Hsu to IU President William Lowe Bryan, October 12, 1909: “I have been  always proud of being the first Chinese graduate in Indiana.”

Showin Wetzen Hsu paved the way for many Chinese students to attend Indiana University. Within 10 years, more than 10 Chinese students would find their way to IU.

Feel free to contact the Indiana University Archives if you would like to learn more about the history of Chinese students at IU.

Behind the Curtain: Sophia Phillips, Processor and Encoder

Behind the Curtain is a series highlighting IU Archives staff, partners from various departments of the IU Libraries, and students who make all of our work possible. Continue to follow over the coming months to read how and who make the magic happen!

Role: Sophia assists with the Modern Political Papers collection, where she helps to inventory and organize the papers of the Richard Lugar collection (see here for an inventory of the Lugar Legislative Activity Files, 1977-2010). In the fall of 2016, she also worked as an encoder with the IU Board of Trustees and Bloomington Faculty Council minutes.

Educational Background: B.A. in Spanish from University of Colorado–Boulder with a minor in History; Current MLS student at IU

How she got here:  Before attending IU, Sophia completed an internship with the Stephen H. Hart Library and Research Center at the History Colorado Center in Denver. Her internship involved doing a research survey of the library’s Research Services Inc. collection. She identified the subjects of the records, which covered a variety of subjects such as education surveys and political polls. Then, she compiled all of this information into an Excel spreadsheet to create an informal finding aid.

She was interested in working at the IU Archives to gain more first-hand experience with archival materials, and try to learn about as many different activities involved in archives as possible. She also wanted to see how a university archives operates to understand how it differs from other archival institutions.

Projects: Sophia used TEI to encode the historical minutes of the Board of Trustees and make them available online. She worked her way through the early 1900s. She also encoded the Bloomington Faculty Council minutes from the past two years.

Favorite experience in the IU Archives: Sophia enjoys being able to work with such a wide variety of material types, from photos, to press clippings, to memorabilia.

What she’s learned from working here: She’s learned more about some of the major figures in IU history, such as David Starr Jordan and Daniel Kirkwood. She says it’s interesting to recognize names from buildings and streets that she sees every day, and to find out who they were named for.

The Legendary Prankster: Leon Varjian

It’s April Fools’ Day, which means that it’s officially the 42nd anniversary of the first-ever Banana Olympics held on the Indiana University campus. As ridiculous as it sounds, yes, it was a very real event—and a political one, at that, as it was held as a fundraiser for the campaign of graduate Leon Varjian, who in 1975 was running for mayor of Bloomington. Some of the very, very serious campaign promises included: turning Indiana University into a theme park similar to Disney Land called “IU-Land,” constructing a giant Monopoly board in downtown Bloomington around the Courthouse Square, a 100% unemployment rate (as everyone will become, instead, a civil servant, taking over new posts such as the town drunk or the resident derelict), carpeting all of the sidewalks, and replacing all of the parking meters with bubble gum machines. Still don’t believe me? Have a look for yourself:

Yes, Leon Varjian was a real person, and a real clown (okay, not a literal clown, but he was a hilarious guy.) Unfortunately, Varjian passed away in 2015, but the archives recently received his papers from his time in Bloomington. I’ve been given the task of processing them, and it’s been one of the most fun projects I’ve ever had during my time at the archives. Several times during the processing of these papers I’ve been caught in an unstoppable fit of giggles.

Right-click on the image to open it in a new tab, zoom in and read the article. Trust me, it’s worth it.

Varjian showed up in Bloomington in 1972, and from that moment on, nothing was the same. Originally hoping to receive his graduate degree in mathematics, he ended up with that and more—a reputation for being the funny man on campus. He was politically active from the start, running first for student government representing the “Birthday Party,” then for mayor of Bloomington on the “Fun City” ticket, and finally for IU Trustee on an equally ridiculous, nonsensical platform. I’m not sure if he won a seat on the student government, but he tragically did not become mayor of Bloomington (coming in third out of four candidates with 776 votes) or the IU Trustee. But if I’ve learned anything about Varjian from his papers, it’s that he was certainly a politically active and opinionated person, even if his campaigns weren’t serious at all. He collected numerous newspapers and clippings with political stories and held onto documents he received from the “War Tax Resistance” in the early 70’s. I have an inkling that he did want to make a difference, and his campaigns did in their own way. Larry A. Conrad, Indiana’s Secretary of State at the time, certainly seemed to think so.

He was smart, too. You can tell by the hundreds of loose leaf papers found in this collection that have free-form notes scribbled over them, which you could probably glean something from if you had the time and patience to make sense out of them. The notes could be anything from political notes to song lyrics to article ideas for one of the several publications he was involved with, such as Fun City. Fun City was an alternative publication that ran from 1975 to at least 1976, but probably discontinued after that when Varjian left Bloomington to pursue a short-lived career as a computer programmer in D.C. Anyone remember seeing one of the 13,000 weekly copies of this floating around on campus?

Some of the other publications he might have had a hand in were The Daily Stupid and The Daily Horrible-Terrible, both of which we have copies of in this collection. They were mock versions of the Indiana Daily Student and The Herald Times that came out annually, filled with satire articles and parodies. If you come in to see the collection, I recommend giving them a read.

When he left D.C. after only a short time, he returned to school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where his trickster ways gained national fame. He teamed up with friend Jim Mallon (future executive producer of Mystery Science Theater 3000) and pulled off a couple of enormous (albeit harmless) pranks. They covered historic Bascom Hill with a thousand pink flamingos for a fundraiser and put a huge replica of the Statue of Liberty’s head and torch on Lake Mendota while it was frozen over.

 

Imagine the time they spent planning this.

So today, on April Fools’ Day, we remember and celebrate prankster legend Leon Varjian. He certainly brought a smile to my face– and I think he brought about laughter and happiness during a time when America desperately needed a little sunshine. I’ve had a great time processing this collection, and I only wish I could have met the man himself.