The Scholarly Communication Department Welcomes Open Scholarship Diversity Resident

The Scholarly Communication Department welcomes our new Open Scholarship Diversity Resident this week – Willa Liburd Tavernier. Willa is the IU Libraries’ first Diversity Resident. She will be working with the Scholarly Communication Department and IU Press to advocate for and assess the impact of policies and practices that make research, educational materials, and data, openly accessible.

Willa Liburd Tavernier, IU Libraries Open Scholarship Resident

Willa’s current research interests include investigating the underlying theoretical basis for open scholarship, and critical information literacy.  Before joining IU, Willa worked as a student specialist at the University of Iowa conducting bibliographic analysis of open access funded research and assisting with administration of the institutional repository.

Willa earned her MLIS from the School of Library and Information Science at the University of Iowa together with a Graduate Certificate in College Teaching.  She also holds a Master of Laws from American University Washington College of Law, a Legal Education Certificate from Norman Manley Law School and a Bachelor of Laws from the University of the West Indies at Cave Hill.

Please join us in welcoming Willa to the IU Libraries!

The Scholarly Communication Department Welcomes Two New Graduate Students

Join us in welcoming two new graduate student assistants to the Scholarly Communication Department! We are thrilled to have Allison Nolan and Brian Watson join our team. Both Allison and Brian are new master’s students in the Information and Library Science (ILS) Program in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering.

allison nolan photo

Allison Nolan received her Bachelor of Arts in English and Humanities from Valparaiso University in 2017. She worked for three years in the Valparaiso University Christopher Center library as the Marketing Student Assistant. In addition to working with the IU Library Scholarly Communications Department, she is also the Center Supervisor for the Teter residence hall library.

brian watson photo

Brian Watson is a historian of sexuality and the book. After winning several awards for his MA thesis, he expanded it into a full-length monograph which was featured on Conan O’Brien and elsewhere. He is a moderator for the world’s largest academic history forum, AskHistorians, and an editor and host of its podcast. He plans to focus on the interactions of humanities, archives and the digital world throughout his time at IU. He is also currently working on his next book, which focuses on the historiography of sexuality research.

We look forward to working with Allison and Brian. We can’t wait to see what they accomplish during their time at IU!

Indexing Your Journal

In order to be found by other scholars and considered legitimate, your journal should be discoverable and visible. Journal indexing is an excellent way to increase discoverability, allowing you to achieve higher rates of readership and citation. Indexing enables your journal to reach a wider audience and become a part of trusted academic databases used frequently by researchers in all disciplines.

Once your journal is indexed in a database, important metadata about your publication (and sometimes the full text of your journal’s articles)  will be available (and searchable) by all of the database’s users. Additionally, as potential authors assess the visibility and impact of your journal, they’ll find that it is widely indexed and discoverable by audiences they are trying to reach. For example, below is a screenshot of indexing coverage from Ulrichs, a database with information about journals and other serials. Ulrichs is a common tool promoted for faculty and graduate students looking for publication venues.  

Screenshot of Abstracting and Indexing in Ulrichs

How do you go about getting indexed by these databases and/ or directories? We have provided a step-by-step Guide to Applying for Journal Indexing to help you through this process! The guide includes a list of  highly used databases that new journals should consider being indexed in. , These include UlrichsWeb, EBSCO, and ProQuest. For each database, we list a quick summary of the database’s scope, the basic set of requirements necessary to be indexed, and links to the necessary forms to start the index application process.

Logo for Directory of Open Access Journals

Our department also provides in-depth  assistance for journals in our program interested in being indexed in  the Directory of Open Access Journals (DOAJ). DOAJ is an online directory that indexes open access, peer-reviewed journals, and is considered to be one of the best indicators of high quality for open access content. Authors often go to DOAJ to confirm that an open access publication is not predatory, for example. The Journal Application Form for indexing within DOAJ is detailed , but we have compiled a template that will help you answer each of these questions. Our DOAJ Application Template walks editors through each question, providing default answers for questions that apply to all IU Open Journals, as well as locations for questions you may not be sure about.

If you have any concerns or questions about indexing your journal, contact us at iusw@indiana.edu. We’re happy to meet one-on-one with editorial teams interested in indexing!

Managing Research Identity: ORCID

Indiana University Libraries are pleased to announce that we have joined ORCID – a nonprofit organization that provides an open, transparent solution for researcher identity management. IU faculty, staff, and students can use ORCID to create an ORCID iD – a 16-digit number that uniquely identifies a researcher. This iD is then linked to an individual’s research output. With the help of ORCID iDs, IU faculty and staff can more easily receive credit and recognition for their work, reduce time spent on reporting and administrative requirements, and continually and automatically update their dossiers by incorporating services such as CrossRef and DataCite. 

An ORCID iD helps you easily and reliably link your unique identity with your contributions. You can maintain all of your key information in one place, and you control your own privacy settings. ORCID allows you to link with other identifier systems, including those maintained by funders and publishers, and exchange data freely with those research information systems. For example, authors can often log in to journal submission systems using their ORCID iDs, sparing them from continually re-entering affiliation and contact information. Furthermore, when an article is subsequently published, a citation and link automatically appear in that author’s ORCID profile, enabling easy access to other publications for interested readers.

Registration is free and fast for IU researchers and scholars. ORCID is integrated with IU CAS Login, which enables users to utilize their IU login information to automatically create an account affiliated with Indiana University. When you Sign Up for your free ORCID iD, select “Institutional account” in order to login with your IU credentials.

If you have any questions about creating or using an ORCID iD, please contact us at iusw@indiana.edu.

The Great American Read

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department student assistant Jenny Hoops and Scholars Commons Librarian Alyssa Denneler.

Source: https://www.pbs.org/the-great-american-read/resources/downloads/

The Great American Read is an eight-part televised series on PBS that celebrates the American novel. The series is the centerpiece of a digital, educational and community outreach campaign, designed to get the country reading and passionately talking about books. With the help of a national survey, PBS has selected 100 of America’s “most-loved novels”. These novels range widely in terms of time period, setting, and tone, but all have captured the interest of the public and crafted American literary culture.

Libraries are a great a way to access these 100 books- and not just through the traditional check-out process. About one-fifth of these books are public domain, meaning that they are out of copyright, and thus can be accessed digitally completely free. Public domain also ensures users the right to reuse, adapt, or transform these works without restriction, encouraging meaningful engagement with the material for years to come.  IU’s HathiTrust is an excellent resource for these public domain books. Classics such as Frankenstein, Pride and Prejudice, and The Call of the Wild, to name only a few, are available in a high quality, accessible format. Countless books beyond those in the Great American Read’s Top 100 are in the public domain, and IU librarians are always ready to help you figure out which books are out of copyright and free for you to find and use.

Take some time this fall to re-read an old favorite, or pick up a new classic recommended by others! Before the voting ends in October, check out the Great American Read display in the Wells Library Scholars’ Commons, on the bookshelf in front of Hazelbaker hall. All of the available books for this initiative have been collected there so you can more easily find your next great read. They’re all available for check out as well, if you feel compelled to take one home with you. Finally, you can still vote online for your favorite.

Curious about Open Access and the public domain? Our Scholarly Communication department is leading a workshop this fall on Starting an Open Access Journal, where you can learn more about academic publishing in a new way.

Office of Scholarly Publishing in the News

This summer, the Office of Scholarly Publishing has been reflecting on the services we provide and the value we bring to IU’s campus and open access scholarly publishing broadly. Simultaneously, the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP) has been mentioned in several recent articles and news pieces on open access publishing and author rights. I believe that these pieces start to answer our questions about the value, perspective, and expertise that we contribute to the larger community.

Jason Jackson’s post, which discusses Museum Anthropology Review’s business and labor model, highlights the instrumental role library publishers play in the open access ecosystem. Jason states,

I am not able to quantify the financial investments that the IU Libraries have made in MAR via the IUSW program, but the investment is significant and important…. just as MAR tries to serve the field without charging fees for that service, IUSW tries to serve projects like MAR without charging fees for that service. It is certainly the case that economies of scale have been realized by having library-based publishing support services that can concurrently help a wide range of (mostly small) journal projects.

Another recent piece, “What Happened, or, Impasses and Future Horizons for an Open Anthropology of Work” grapples with the challenges of operationalizing open access in the field of anthropology. The editorial cites conversations with the Office of Scholarly Publishing to make an important anthropology title, Anthropology Work Review, open access. While the effort was not successful and we do not currently publish AWR, the piece is important for demonstrating the values that IU’s OSP is dedicated to. Conversations with AWR were also a reflective exercise for our team, as they forced us to reflect on and operationalize our values, which in turn led to a better understanding of our own mission and ethics.

Finally, a recent op ed (first presented as a keynote) discusses the 50th anniversary of the Liberian Studies Association and mentions the association’s journal, the Liberian Studies Journal. The OSP currently hosts the journal’s back issues and is in conversations to help the publication renew publication efforts.

When I think about what OSP is and what we aim to be, I envision a meaningful partnership between IU Press and IU Libraries Scholarly Communication staff that encourages cross-pollination, harnesses disparate publishing resources, and pools expertise strategically in order to transform scholarly publishing at IU by:

  1. Serving IU faculty and students, through journal publishing, open access book publishing, and course material publishing.
  2. Moving conversations on publishing innovations forward on campus and in the larger community. This includes, but isn’t limited to, conversations around experimental peer review, course material affordability, hybrid OA models, open source infrastructure, and new modes of scholarship, including 3D object and multi-media integration.  
  3. Educating the next generation of scholars, both through supporting the creation of student publishing projects and creating programming and hands-on experiences for students interested in publishing, open access, and scholarly career paths.
  4. Moving the national conversation on library publishing, library/press partnerships, and open access forward.

I’m excited to see that we are already making a significant impact in several of these areas, including number four. The pieces above demonstrate that we are both inspiring and contributing to important national conversations that will impact the future of open access publishing.

Applications for OpenCon 2018 Open

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department Graduate Student Jenny Hoops.

The fifth annual OpenCon 2018 will be held in Toronto this November 2-4. In coordination with SPARC and the Right to Research Coalition, as well as York University, Ryerson University, and the University of Toronto, OpenCon aims to educate and develop Open Access, Open Education, and Open Data around the world.

opencon 2018 logo

The two-day conference will feature a diverse set of panels, regional workshops,  and project presentations. The final day will also involve an innovative “Do-A-Thon” that will encourage content creation that will hopefully create resources and collaborations that will last long after the conference formally ends.

OpenConMap of participation

Attendance at the meeting is by application only, and past participants have received full or partial travel scholarships. Students and early career professionals are particularly encouraged to apply. Apply at www.opencon2018.org/apply for a chance to network with other passionate advocates for a more Open world.

Summer Project Roundup

Campus may be deserted, but Scholarly Communication is working hard this summer to wrap up projects (and start some new ones) before the fall semester. Here are some of the things we’re looking forward to this summer:

  • Video training modules: Starting with some of our most frequently asked questions, we will be creating short explanatory modules that can be watched individually or linked together to create a training program for a system, concept, or policy.
  • Open Scholarship expansion: Our website, openscholarship.indiana.edu will be undergoing some changes to better reflect the work we are doing and provide some more content for our patrons. You can expect a new and improved workflow for depositing data into IUScholarWorks as well as information on creating and adopting Open Educational Resources.
  • Crossref Cited-by: We are exploring the possibility of participating in the Cited-by service, which would enable authors and readers who use our journal programs to discover who is citing the articles we publish.
  • Journal metrics: This summer we are working on a plan to share journal usage data with editorial teams. We hope to have a plan and template in place by September so that we can launch the service in fall.

If you have questions or would like to propose a project to the Scholarly Communication department, don’t hesitate to reach out by email (iusw@indiana.edu) or tweet us @iulibraries

Exploring Open Journals: An Open Access Article Showcase on the Portrayal of Scientists in Children’s Books

This post was authored by Scholarly Communication Department student assistant Regine Vincent.

Through the Office of Scholarly Publishing (OSP), a partnership between the IU Libraries and the Indiana University Press, readers everywhere have access to 30+ scholarly  journals and scholarly publications free of charge. One of these journals is The Hoosier Science Teacher.

The Hoosier Science Teacher aims to “provide science educators in Pre-K-12 classrooms, informal education, home schools, and college classrooms with ideas and resources for teaching science…[and publish] content that may help support effective teaching of science and professional development for science educators.” First published in 1975 by The Hoosier Association of Science Teachers, Inc. (HASTI), The Hoosier Science Teacher published regularly in print until 2014. In 2017, publication of the Teacher resumed electronically.  All of the journal’s content is immediately accessible, as open access is core to its mission. The journal’s Managing Editor, Matthew J. Benus, is an Assistant Professor of Science Education in the IU Northwest School of Education and a Think Tank & Strategic Consultant for Science & Learning.

Published biannually, the most recent volume of the journal Volume 40 Issue 1 (2018) contains 7 articles covering a variety of topics from lessons and demonstrations and instructional insight to curriculum and learning environments. One of the articles in the current issue is entitled “How Scientists are Portrayed in NSTA Recommends Books” and is authored by Kevin D. Finson and Cecile Arquette of Bradley University and Donna Farland-Smith of The Ohio State University. Finson, Arquette, and Smith argue that while “there was much consistency in how scientists were portrayed in the books across the three years…there were also issues with appropriate numbers of representations of minorities, women, and age of scientists.”

The authors focus on how depictions of scientists in school books affect children’s “perceptions of scientists,” as such perceptions impact students’ “understanding about where scientists work and what they do,” students’ attitudes towards science, as well as students’ success in science learning. While determining exactly how students develop their view of scientists is not easy, they find that media sources have the largest influence or impact. Stereotypes of scientists as older, white males in children’s literature has implications for children that do not identify with these portrayals. Such portrayals can affect students’ “formation of science identity,” which affects “one’s perception that he/she can be a successful investigator in science contexts and is viewed by others as being competent in science.”

Seeing as depictions of scientists in school books have major impacts on students’ interactions with and views of the field of science, tackling the issue of stereotypical depictions is a must. The authors suggest that one way to address this issue is through  “the use of science trade books and picture books in instruction…[teacher-planned] student-centered activities that give [students] opportunities to explore their world and encourage them to think of themselves as scientists.”

The Hoosier Science Teacher’s commitment to open access and immediate availability makes it an immediately accessible and useful resource for teachers. According to Education Week Teacher, educators around the United States spend more than $1 billion dollars a year out-of-pocket on school supplies and resources for their students. This is particularly troubling for schools serving lower-income neighborhoods where, according to NPR, “teachers in high-poverty schools often find themselves digging even deeper into their own pockets.” Access to publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher may help educators to alleviate some of the out-of-pocket costs that they encounter when trying to access needed resources and literature on experimental approaches for their students and their teaching. 

The IU Libraries is committed to diverse collections and perspectives, as the Libraries Diversity Strategic Plan notes that “diversity is… essential to the intellectual vitality of the university.” The Scholarly Communication department shares this commitment and aims to highlight IU’s diversity through our journal publishing program and through supporting publications like The Hoosier Science Teacher.

Scholarly Communication Deparment Student Assistant Jenny Hoops Wins Award

Congratulations to Jenny Hoops, Scholarly Communication Department Student Assistant, on winning the IUB Libraries Student Employee Recognition Award! The purpose of the award is to recognize student employees who demonstrate outstanding performance and make exceptional contributions toward the achievement of the department’s goals and objectives.

photo of jenny hoops

In my nomination of Jenny, I wrote the following:

Jenny has exceeded the expectations for her position, furthering the IU Libraries strategic goals and enabling the Scholarly Communication Department to successfully operationalize several key services….Her creativity and ability to problem solve independently have been assets for our team and for the library.

We’re thankful for Jenny’s initiative and excellent work over the last year and we’re thrilled that her work has been recognized through this important award. Jenny and three other recipients of the award will receive certificates and $100 cash awards.