Upcoming Workshop: Maximizing Your Research Impact

An Overview of Scholarly Metrics

The Scholarly Communication Department will be presenting a Scholars’ Commons workshop on maximizing research impact and the range of scholarly metrics now available to researchers.

March 29th 2016 @ 12:00pm – 1:00pm
Hazelbaker Hall (E159)

The workshop will provide an overview and introduction to how traditional and nontraditional scholarly metrics, such as Journal Impact Factor, h-index, ImpactStory, and Altmetrics are being used to gather evidence and demonstrate potential value and research impact during promotion and tenure proceedings. Participants will learn the importance of unique author identifiers including ORCID and Researcher ID, and discuss relevant issues such as choosing a journal for your research, open access, and using scholarly networking tools. Academics from all disciplines are encouraged to attend. Bring a brown bag lunch and join us!

Presented by Erica Hayes & Richard Higgins. Register for the workshop here.

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Spring 2016 Copyright & Publishing Workshops Are Here!

We are thrilled to announce our lineup of Copyright & Publishing workshops for Spring 2016. Join the Scholarly Communication team and our colleagues in the Libraries, the IU Press, and the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education to learn about copyright for visual artists, creating a research poster, scholarly metrics, and more!

Schedule of copyright and publishing workshops

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Scholarly Communication Consultation Schedule for Spring 2016

This spring staff members from the Scholarly Communication department will once again be holding consultation sessions in the Scholars’ Commons. Naz will hold consultation hours once a week for issues related to copyright and intellectual property. And once per month, Shayna and Richard will be available to answer questions about using the IUScholarWorks institutional repository and the Open Journal System. Our hours for the Spring semester are as follows:

Copyright Information Services
Presented by Naz Pantaloni​
Friday, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm in room 157R

Open Access Publishing
Presented by Shayna Pekala & Richard Higgins
Second Thursday of each month, 2:00 pm – 3:00pm in room 157R
Jan 14, Feb 11, Mar 10, Apr 14

The Scholars Commons is located on the first floor of the East Tower at the Herman B Wells Library. These are drop-in hours, so no appointment is necessary.

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New Monographic Series Launched in IUScholarWorks: Ethnomusicology Translations

IUScholarWorks is excited to announce the launch of Ethnomusicology Translations, a new monographic series that publishes ethnomusicological literature translated into English.  I interviewed Steve Stuempfle, Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations, about his experiences initiating this online publication series and he graciously answered a few of my questions:

Erica Hayes: What is Ethnomusicology Translations and how did it get started?

Steve Stuempfle:  Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer-reviewed, open-access online series for the publication of ethnomusicological literature translated into English. The series is published by the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEM), an organization founded in 1955 to promote research and study of all forms of music and their cultural contexts. For several years, the SEM membership has been calling for increased access to ethnomusicological scholarship across language barriers. We assembled an editorial team to pursue this endeavor and, thanks to a partnership with Indiana University Libraries, obtained a publishing platform. Our hope is that the new publication will be read not only by ethnomusicologists but by scholars from other fields and by anyone with an interest in music around the world.

How long have you been involved with Ethnomusicology Translations and in what capacity?

I have been working on translations initiatives at SEM since joining the organization as Executive Director in 2008. Over the past couple of years, I have been serving as Project Manager of Ethnomusicology Translations. My job is to address publication logistics, while the editorial team handles content.

Ethnomusicology Translations is a peer reviewed, open access online series. What made you adopt an open access model for this publication series and partner with IU Libraries?

We adopted an open-access model in order to reach as wide an audience as possible. A fundraising campaign at SEM has provided monies for translating, while our editorial team is volunteering their time. We partnered with Indiana University Libraries because of its success in offering quality scholarly publications through IUScholarWorks.

Who can nominate articles for inclusion in Ethnomusicology Translations and what is the nomination process?

Anyone can nominate an article to Ethnomusicology Translations by emailing General Editor Richard Wolf at rwolf@fas.harvard.edu. For brief nomination guidelines, see http://www.ethnomusicology.org/?Pub_EthnoTrans. Accepted nominations are assigned to a manuscript editor and then to a translator.

What are your plans for Ethnomusicology Translations over the next few years?

Our goal for the next few years is to publish translations of important ethnomusicological articles from a wide range of languages. Since Ethnomusicological Translations is a monograph series, rather than a journal, translated articles can be published at any time—as soon as they have gone through the peer review and editorial process. Each issue of Ethnomusicology Translation is a single article.

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Open Access Week 2015

It’s that time of year again!  On October 19th-23rd, IU Bloomington will celebrate Open Access Week 2015.  Open Access Week is a great opportunity for students, faculty, and librarians to learn more about the potential benefits of open access scholarship and research.  In lieu of this year’s theme, “Open for Collaboration,” IU Bloomington has put together a great series of workshops with speakers from the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research, Indiana University Press, and the IU Libraries.  Topics of discussion will include data management, academic publishing for early-career researchers, journal publishing agreements, and more.  All are encouraged to attend and learn from each other!

See below for a detailed list of workshops to be held during Open Access Week 2015:

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, The Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences

Tuesday, October 20, 2015 | Wells W144 | 3pm-4pm
Open Lab: IUScholarWorks

  • Shayna Pekala and Richard Higgins, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Wells E159 | 3pm-4pm
What You Need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Wells E159 | 12pm-1pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

 Friday, October 23, 2015 | Wells E158 | 11am-1pm
Data Management 101 (Lunch included)

  • Heather Coates, Michelle Dalmau, and Jennifer Laherty, Indiana University Libraries
  • Tassie Gniady and Sofia McDowell, Office of Research Compliance
  • Kristy Kallback-Rose, UITS Research Technologies
  • Jennifer Guiliano, Department of History, IUPUI
  • Kalani Craig, Department of History, IUB
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Fall 2015 Academic Publishing Workshop Series

The Office of Scholarly Publishing will be hosting a series of Academic Publishing workshops this fall semester.  Topics of discussion will include how to navigate the world of academic publishing, book proposal writing, journal publishing agreements, and preparing a scholarly journal.  Faculty and students planning to publish their research are encouraged to attend!

You may sign up for any of the following workshops and view the complete schedule, including abstracts at http://iub.libcal.com/

Here is the list of workshops being offered:

Monday, September 28, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 1:00pm-2:00pm
How to Write a Book Proposal

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press

Monday, October 5, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 1pm-2pm
How to Start a Scholarly Journal

  • Shayna Pekala, Indiana University Libraries
  • Michael Regoli, Indiana University Press

Monday, October 19, 2015 | Scholar’s Commons IQ-Wall (Wells E157H) | 12pm-1pm
Research and Publishing Opportunities for Undergraduates

  • Jane Rogan, Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education
  • Song Kim and Benjamin Cummins, Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research
  • Anne Prieto, Psychological & Brain Sciences Faculty

Wednesday, October 21, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 3pm-4pm
What You need to Know Before Signing a Journal Publishing Agreement

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries

Thursday, October 22, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 12pm-1:30pm
Getting Published: Advice from Editors for Early-Career Researchers (Lunch included)

  • Dee Mortensen, Indiana University Press
  • Moira Marsh, Indiana University Libraries

Wednesday, October 28, 2015 | Hazelbaker Hall (Wells E159) | 10:30am-12:00pm
Copyright, Fair Use, and Permissions (for Journal Editors)

  • Nazareth Pantaloni, Indiana University Libraries
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Meet the New Faces of IUScholarWorks

The IUScholarWorks team is growing! We recently welcomed several new faces to the Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Department, including one full-time staff member and two student employees. I’d like to introduce you to Richard, Miko, and Erica.

New team members (from left to right) Erica Hayes, Richard Higgins, Miko Siewenie

New team members (from left to right) Erica Hayes, Richard Higgins, Miko Siewenie

Richard Higgins, Open Access Publishing Manager

Richard spent a good deal of his childhood wandering the stacks of a small college library in his hometown. After moving to the midwest, he worked in publishing and taught English and Digital Humanities while completing a Ph.D. in literary studies at IU. Since then he has specialized in ways that digital and computational technologies can enrich scholarship in the Humanities. He still loves books, in whatever form.

Miko Siewenie, IUScholarWorks Technology Assistant

Miko Siewenie is a senior majoring in Informatics with a Computer Science cognate and minors in Spanish and Marketing. On campus, she’s actively involved with Indiana University Student Association as the student government’s Co-Chief of Marketing and Webmaster and the Indiana University Journal of Undergraduate Research as Information Technology Chair and Webmaster. Miko also works for the Office of the Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education as the Student Coordinator of the Indiana University Undergraduate Research Conference, the School of Informatics and Computing as a Supplementary Instruction Leader, and last, but not least, IU Libraries as IUScholarWorks Technology Assistant. When she finally escapes campus, she enjoys cooking, skiing, crosswords, and bad movies.

Erica Hayes, IDEASc Fellow

Erica Hayes is a second-year MLS/MIS dual degree student at Indiana University–Bloomington, where she specializes in scholarly communication and digital special collections.  Her student library jobs span digital publishing, instruction, outreach, and project management.  Erica is currently a graduate assistant to Dr. Milojovic and Dr. Sugimoto.  In addition, she also works as the Web Development Assistant at the Lilly Library.  This year she was given the opportunity to work as the Master’s student research assistant as part of the IDEASc (Integrated Doctoral Education with application to Scholarly Communication) Fellowship Program.  She is excited to work with IUScholarWorks and learn more about open access publishing.

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The Learnability Project Archive: A Model for Faculty Collections in IUScholarWorks

Learnability Project logo

I’d like to share a recent example of how an IU faculty member used IUScholarWorks to share research materials from a 30-year, NIH-funded research project online. Take a look at the Learnability Project archive. These collections, created by Judith A. Gierut, Professor Emerita of Speech and Hearing and founder of the Learnability Project, include working papers, data sets, and journal articles from 1980-2015. Professor Gierut worked closely with IUScholarWorks staff to address issues of metadata, digital preservation, and copyright before depositing her materials. Now that the project is archived in IUScholarWorks, future scholars will be able to access to this important research, and Professor Gierut can rest assured that her life’s work will be preserved for years to come. For more information, read our news item on the Libraries’ website.

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Shareability vs. open access: A summary of the contention around Elsevier’s new sharing policy

Less than a month after the academic publisher Elsevier’s director of access and policy Dr. Alicia Wise posted the company’s new policies for sharing and hosting academic articles at every stage and on every platform, the Coalition of Open Access Repositories (COAR) countered with a statement backed by more than 2,000 organizations and individuals across the globe criticizing Elsevier for creating a policy that “represents a significant obstacle to the dissemination and use of research knowledge, and creates unnecessary barriers for Elsevier published authors in complying with funders’ open access policies,” which has sparked a very public back-and-forth with Dr. Alicia Wise.

COAR originally criticized Elsevier’s policy for masquerading as one to progress sharing capabilities, but instead working to accomplish the reverse. The policy forces embargoes of up to 48 months on some journals, requires authors to apply a “non-commercial and no derivative works” license for every article deposited into a repository, and applies to “all articles previously published and those published in the future.” The policy requires unacceptably long embargoes with 90% of the 286 journals having at least 12 month embargo period, reduces ‘re-use value’ of each article, and could put currently accessible articles under embargoes. The overall complaint was that the policy is a step in the exact opposite direction of the global movement towards open access, works to hinder any benefit of openly sharing research, and is posed as a solution for a policy that did not previously show any evidence of having a negative impact on publisher subscriptions.

Dr. Wise responded just a day later with a rebuttal that was aimed at clearing the air. The publishing company was “a little surprised that COAR has formed such a negative view and chosen not to feedback their concerns directly to us,” especially after Elsevier “received neutral-to-positive responses from research institutions and the wider research community” since the announcement of their new policy. Throughout the response article, Dr. Wise states that the embargo policies have been in place since or before 2004 when the last “refresh” came about and that the other changes have been made based on feedback by their authors and institutional partners. Many complaints in response to this rebuttal by commenters and COAR surround Elsevier’s lack of transparency about the feedback they received and the company’s use of share as a way to avoid the topic of true open access publishing.

COAR’s reply to Elsevier reiterates all of COAR’s original concerns, cites more evidence of the publishing company’s dance around being truly open access, and offers improvements that Elsevier can make to their policy:

  1. Elsevier should allow all authors to make their “author’s accepted manuscript” openly available immediately upon acceptance through an OA repository or other open access platform.
  2. Elsevier should allow authors to choose the type of open license (from CC-BY to other more restrictive licenses like the CC-BY-NC-ND) they want to attach to the content that they are depositing into an open access platform.
  3. Elsevier should not attempt to dictate author’s practices around individual sharing of articles. Individual sharing of journal articles is already a scholarly norm and is protected by fair use and other copyright exceptions. Elsevier cannot, and should not, dictate practices around individual sharing of articles.

The counter concludes with COAR offering to take Dr. Wise up on her ‘offer’ to meet with the company in order to help the publisher better understand what the research community desires, due to the many misperceptions that Elsevier believes are confusing the research community as to the real meaning of the new policy.

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IUScholarWorks Welcomes Primary Source

I am pleased to announce the launch of a new student publication in IUScholarWorks: Primary Source: The Undergraduate Journal of History at Indiana University. The journal was previously published on a standalone website until Vianna Newman, current editor-in-chief, initiated the transition to IUScholarWorks in fall 2014. In the following interview, Newman shares some of her experiences as the editor of an undergraduate publication and the journal’s move to IUScholarWorks:

Shayna Pekala: Tell me a little about Primary Source.

Vianna Newman: A group of undergraduate history students founded Primary Source in the spring of 2011. They wanted to give undergraduates around Indiana and the Big 10 the opportunity to publish their work, which is pretty rare for undergrads. We publish an issue every semester with articles on a wide range of historical topics. The journal has been in its second generation – with none of the original members still on staff – since spring of last year.

How long have you been involved with the journal and in what capacity?

I joined the journal as an editor in January of 2012, and became editor-in-chief in August 2013.

Why did you decide to migrate the journal to IUScholarWorks?

I realized IUScholarWorks would help us with the editing process, specifically in keeping track of our edits and facilitating communication between editors, authors, and myself. Also, since IUScholarWorks hosts so many other journals, I know the website will be a good long-term home for the journal, more so than our previous one. The association with the other journals will also, I hope, increase awareness and readership of Primary Source.

How has the journal benefited since the move to IUScholarWorks?

I’ve been able to keep closer tabs on the progress that’s being made, and it’s been easier to look at and compare edits at various stages. I’ve been more in touch with how the editors are doing, which helps smooth the process.

What do you find most challenging/rewarding about being a journal editor?

The most challenging thing is keeping all the balls in the air. Every semester I’ve worked with anywhere from four to eight editors and five to seven authors. The most rewarding thing is being able to present these students’ great work to the world, even better than when they sent it to us, and knowing that you’ve helped turn something from an essay for a class into a published piece of scholarship.

What advice do you have for students who are interested in becoming involved with the editorial functions of a journal?

Find an existing student publication that really grabs your interest, for example Primary Source if you’re into history, and apply for an editorial position. Or start such a publication if there isn’t one! There are other university journals as well that will take on students as assistants and interns. But in order to secure such a position, the most important thing is to be a skilled writer and to have some experience with peer editing, or tutoring, or helping others with writing in any way.

What advice do you have for authors who are interested in submitting an article to Primary Source?

History is a very broad subject, and we encourage breadth in submission topics! In addition to well-written papers, we are looking for a good amount of analysis, and not just summarization of facts. Authors should take the time to make sure they’ve really developed a good argument. We receive a lot of papers that have great ideas or start well, but don’t quite go as far as we’d like them to. Finally, if authors have any questions, they shouldn’t hesitate to email at primary@indiana.edu.

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