Two New Graduate Students Join the the Scholarly Communication Department

The Scholarly Communication Department is happy to introduce our two new graduate assistants, Alexis Murrell and Matt Vaughn. Both have recently began the master’s program for Information and Library Science (ILS) in the School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering.

Picture of Alexis Murrell with diploma

Alexis recently graduated from Purdue University with a Bachelor of Arts in Public Relations and Strategic Communication and a minor in English. She is currently pursuing a Masters in Library Science with a focus in Rare Books and Manuscripts. In addition to her work for the Scholarly Communications Department, she also works as the Cataloging and Processing Assistant for the Federal Depository Library Program. Her interests are strongly centered around special collections librarianship and donor relations.

Headshot of Matt Vaughn

Matt is pursuing a Masters in Library Science with a specialization in digital humanities. He has a research background in American literature, and instructional experience in English composition and leadership development. He has also worked as an editorial assistant with the Modernist Journals Project and the Journal of Modern Periodical Studies. His current research interests include creating digital resources for literary archives and exploring the role of libraries in language preservation.

We are looking forward to having Matt and Alexis on our team, and can’t wait for them to contribute to our programming and services. Please join us in welcoming them to our department!

IU Libraries Partners with MDPI Open Access Program

MDPI open logo

IU Libraries recently partnered with the Multidisciplinary Digital Publishing Institute (MDPI) as part of their Institutional Open Access Program (IOAP), joining over 550 other institutions. Founded in 2010, MDPI is a publisher of open access scientific journals, meaning that all research outputs are openly licensed and disseminated without barriers, financial or otherwise. Open access publishing is occasionally accompanied with an article processing charge, or APC, which helps offset publishing costs traditionally covered by subscription fees. As part of MDPI’s open access program, researchers from partner institutions receive a 10% discount on their APC when publishing with MDPI. For those interested in publishing with MDPI, the following provides a walkthrough of their submission process, including when and how to apply your IU-affiliated APC discount. 

MDPI’s open access program grants free access to their Submission System (SuSy). MDPI aims to “provide libraries and central offices additional control and transparency over papers submitted to [their] journals, and provide early notification of potential costs involved with the submissions.” New users must register with their IU email. Once registered and logged in, researchers can submit a manuscript for publication following MDPI’s 5-step submission process.

Steps 1 and 2 include inputting manuscript and author information, respectively. Authors suggest three peer reviewers in Step 3 and upload their manuscript in either a Word or ZIP file format in Step 4. Step 5 completes the process and sends a confirmation to the journal’s editors. It is here where authors will be prompted to designate their IOAP partnership and any applicable discounts. Authors will be provided with a drop-down box where they can select IU as their institution and receive the discount. 

drop down menu of IOAP partner institutions
Sample drop-down menu of IOAP partner institutions

Once Indiana University is selected, the APC discount will be automatically processed. IU’s partnership with MDPI is non-centralized, so the remaining APC will be invoiced directly to the author. In addition to MDPI, IU has also partnered with Frontiers, which provides a 7.5% discount for IUB affiliates, and SpringerOpen/BioMed Central, which provides a 15% discount. For additional APC support, authors can apply for IU’s Open Access Article Publishing Fund, which provides scholars up to $2,000 per year to cover open access APCs. For further questions regarding APCs, the IOAP partnership, or publishing with MDPI, see MDPI’s IOAP FAQ page or contact iusw@indiana.edu.

How to Find a Journal Venue

The Scholarly Communication Department often helps graduate students find a journal for their work. Students come to us after they have reworked a course paper or thesis into an article manuscript. They need guidance on how to find journals that offer the readership and impact they’re interested in. In addition to helping students pinpoint venues, we help them understand and weigh the processes and policies of the journals we identify. This includes understanding journals’ peer review process and self-archiving policy. This post summarizes some common strategies and tools we recommend to graduate students, regardless of their discipline.

Find Journal Venues

Evaluate which journals you’re already citing

A quick and easy way to find journal venues is to look at your citation list! Which journals are you citing? Are there journals you seem to cite again and again?

Look at other scholars’ CVs and profiles  

Another strategy for finding journal venues is to look at where others in your subfield are publishing. It was be helpful to browse the CVs or Google Scholar profiles of your advisor, top scholars in your field, or scholars that you continually cite or follow. For example, if you were a scholar in scientometrics, Cassidy Sugimoto’s profile would be useful.

cassidy sugimoto's google scholar profile

Cassidy Sugimoto’s Google Scholar Profile

This strategy can be overwhelming as you have to sift through several journals, some of which are likely out of scope, but if you’d like to create a comprehensive list it can be useful.

Analyze current journal lists

Some disciplines maintain listings of top journals in a specific field. However, these can be difficult to find and sometimes it’s unclear how recently they were updated. The IU Libraries maintains a listing of electronic journals in each discipline. This list is limited, as coverage is limited to what the library has decided to purchase. Still, this strategy can be used as a “quick start” for finding titles. Be sure to navigate into a subfield (for example, “Painting” within Art & Architecture) in order to limit your search to a manageable number of results.

Ask your advisor and subject librarian

Your advisor is incredibly knowledgeable about publishing practices in your field. Don’t forget to consult with them! Faculty advisors can often name the top 5 journals for your specific work, giving you an excellent starting point and cutting down on the amount of research you’ll need to do to curate a list of potential journals. Similarly, subject librarians curate and purchase key journals in your field. Find your subject librarian by visiting the library website. 

Evaluate Journal Venues

You have a list of potential journals! Now, how do you evaluate them in order to select the most appropriate venue for your work? In addition to the readership the journal provides, the following considerations are important for authors to weigh before they submit their work. Most of this information can be found on the journal’s website- if not, details about potential tools you might utilize in order to find this information are provided.

Open access policy and article processing charges

If you submit your work to this journal will readers only be able to access it by paying a fee or subscription? Is there an option for making your work open access or openly available for anyone to read? If so, are authors required to pay a fee (often called an article processing charge or APC)?

APC for "scientific data" journal

An example of a journal’s APC information

Self-archiving policy

Even if the journal is “closed” or only available to readers with a subscription, does this journal allow authors to share a version of their work open access in a repository? Many journal won’t allow authors to share the final version but will allow authors to share a pre-print or postprint (defined below). If this is permitted, which version does the journal support?

description of pre/post/offprint

Definitions of Pre-Print, Postprint, and Version of Record

If this information isn’t explicit on the journal’s website, search for the journal in Sherpa ROMEO, a community database of publisher’s self-archiving policies.

Copyright policy

Does the journal provide the full-text of the copyright agreement they expect authors to sign? Sometimes this will be called the “author agreement” or it might fall under a larger heading entitled copyright policy. It’s important to understand if the journal requires authors to transfer their copyright before submission. If you can’t find this information, ask the editor! Remember that regardless of the policy, our Copyright Program helps authors negotiate these agreements.

Peer review model used

Journals employ different peer-review models: often either double-blind peer review, single-blind peer review, or open peer review. In double blind, authors and reviewers don’t know the identities of each other. In single blind, the reviewer knows the author’ identity but the author doesn’t know who the reviewer is. In open peer review, both the author and the reviewer know each other’s’ identities. Each model has limitations and benefits related to eliminating bias, increasing transparency, and facilitating constructive feedback. It’s important to remember that even within these models journal practices vary, making double-blind review at one journal a little different that double-blind review at another. Look for the peer review policy on the journal’s website. Scholarly Communication staff can help you find and understand details about the peer review process and weigh that process with your goals for having your work reviewed. If the peer review policy for the journal you’re examining seems unusual (for example they promise that double-blind peer review will take two weeks), review our guide on identifying and avoiding predatory publishers.  

Index and database coverage

Readership is so important when selecting a journal venue! One of the ways that scholars search for relevant articles when doing a literature review is by using library databases that “index” or include details (and sometimes the full text) of articles in their field. For example, if you’re a scholar in literature and languages you probably know about MLA Bibliography–it’s the place to start your research. In short, it’s important to consider where your potential journal venue is indexed as it will impact other scholars that look for your work in library databases.

A tool called Ulrichs provides this information (and many more details!) for thousands of journals. Simply search for a journal title, click on the title, and then select “Abstracting and Indexing.”

ulrichs details for nature

 

Databases and Indexes the journal Nature appears in

Metrics

Finally, if you’re interested in going into academia, metrics like journal impact factor can be important factors in selecting a journal. Journal impact factor calculates the average number of citations a particular journal has over a two year period, quantifying how much it is cited in other works. While these kinds of metrics have been heavily critiqued, search committees and tenure review committees commonly take these metrics into account when reviewing your work.

A tool called Journal Citation Reports (JCR) provides the impact factor and other citation information for thousands of journals, mostly in the sciences and social sciences. Simply search for the journal title and JCR will provide the impact factor.

JCR search

Impact factor and citation information for the Journal of Nutrition

This number doesn’t mean anything without context and impact factors vary significantly by discipline. You can also search for a listing of journals in your field and sort them by impact factor, which can be helpful for understanding what an average impact factor in your area is.

Important Tools

Below is a summary of the tools mentioned. Many are available through the library website!

  • Ulrichs: provides detailed information, including editorial board information, indexing/ database coverage, peer review status, and open access information for more than 164,000 serials published throughout the world
  • Sherpa ROMEO: a crowdsourced database of publisher self-archiving policies, including journals and book publishers
  • Predatory Publishers Guide: a guide with details about predatory publishing practices and tips for ensuring that a journal is legitimate
  • Journal Citation Reports (JCR): a database of citation data for 12,000 scholarly and technical journals from approximately 3,300 publishers. Coverage is heavily focused on the sciences and social sciences.

Still have questions? Schedule a consultation by e-mailing iusw@indiana.edu! We also always recommend that you meet with your faculty advisor as they are knowledgeable about publishing practices and norms within your discipline and area of interest.

IUScholarWorks: Share and preserve your work in IU’s institutional repository

The IUScholarWorks repository is one of the open scholarship services at Indiana University Libraries.  It provides a platform to make the research, instructional tools, and creative activities of IU scholars freely available, while ensuring these resources are curated, discoverable and preserved for the future. Faculty and graduate students can freely deposit their work in IUScholarWorks. Undergraduate students who have faculty permission can also make their work digitally and freely available.

Whether you want to share your work with the university or the world, build a digital collection of your work in one place, or you need to share your work in order to comply with a grant, the repository supports sharing  a wide variety of materials, including:

You can also use IUScholarWorks to create a central space for published work e.g. related articles, questionnaires, manuals, underlying data, methodologies, presentations, protocols, and course syllabi.  Use our CV Service to do this, or create a research collection on IU ScholarWorks

Depositing your work in the IUScholarWorks repository makes your work more discoverable, easy to cite, and provides metrics on use.  Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work.  Each deposit is assigned a persistent URL such as a handle, or a DOI.  IUScholarWorks is indexed by major search engines, such as Google Scholar.  

Since all content is open access, anyone can find your work, regardless of whether they are associated with Indiana University.

You can link your work that is deposited in the institutional repository with your Google Scholar profile, or your ORCID record. Google Scholar profiles are one of the most common tools used by researchers to publicize and track their work, receive alerts about new citations, and gather metrics for promotion and  tenure dossiers.

ORCID is a unique identifier connecting you with your entire scholarly record, not just your publications. You can connect your ORCID with publications,  grant funding, organizations at which you have worked or studied, and other identifiers.

ORCID can automatically update this information if you choose to set up that option.  Having an ORCID increases the accuracy, transparency, and visibility of your scholarly record.

You can post the IUScholarWorks link for your work or collection to ORCID or on professional online communities and social media platforms such as personal or departmental blogs, LinkedIn, Twitter, or other social networking resources used by scholars. When posting to social network platforms, it’s a good idea to write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important.

Tip: Write a plain language summary emphasizing what your work is about and why it is important, then post the summary and a link to the item in IUScholarWorks on the platform of your choice.

Remember that your affiliation with Indiana University or similar institutions affords you information privilege that others do not enjoy, by giving you a high level of access to “research material, including journal articles, data, and primary sources…. access to additional research support, faculty, and a peer network, [and] the opportunity to build upon existing research and enter the scholarly conversation”.

There are plenty of people who might need access to your studies–scholars from small institutionslow-income countriespatient advocatespatients themselvescitizen scientists, and members of the general public. Publishing open access will enable a wide range of persons to access and learn from your work.

Your work is worth sharing!  Register on IUScholarworks today (https://scholarworks.iu.edu/deposit) , and email iusw@indiana.edu for authorization to deposit your work in IUScholarWorks!

 

Major Open Scholarship Website Update Includes New Open Education Tab

IU Libraries’ Open Scholarship website, an overview of open scholarship services provided by the Scholarly Communication department, recently underwent a major update. One of the  most notable changes to the site is the addition of the Open Education tab, which provides information on the library’s services regarding Open Educational Resources (OER). OER are teaching and learning resources shared under an open license, usually a Creative Commons license, that renders them compatible with the 5Rs of Open Education; they can be retained, reused, revised, remixed, and redistributed in perpetuity and without restrictions. OER provide free course materials to students, which help combat the rising price of textbooks (the average student at IUB spends over $1,000 on textbooks per year). The customizable nature of OER allows them to be closely tailored to specific courses and better reflect current events and new discoveries. While it can difficult to navigate implementing the right OER into your classroom, the Scholarly Communication department can help instructors find, evaluate, and create OER. The following is a detailed synopsis of the new open education tab, intended to help patrons understand the process of incorporating open education and OER into their pedagogy. This process often begins with searching for pre-existing OER to include in your course.

Screenshot of Open Education tab on Open Scholarship website

 

Find

There are many ways to approach finding OER. One possible starting point is to search for keywords in conjunction with “open educational resources” in your preferred search engine. There are also several OER repositories that can help streamline the process: the Open Education tab’s “find” subsection provides a list of some of our favorite repositories, and the IU OER LibGuide contains several other suggested resources. The LibGuide also provides access to the Mason OER Metafinder (MOM), which searches across several OER repositories. Often, there are many potentially relevant OER and choosing the right option for your classroom can be difficult. The following section provides evaluation tips and suggestions to make sure you are choosing the most appropriate resources.

Evaluate

As OER can be created, used, and revised by anybody, instructors may have concerns regarding their quality and suitability. The process for evaluating OER is very similar to evaluating any other course material; the only difference is understanding each resource’s specific license. The OER Evaluation Checklist provides a walkthrough of considerations when evaluating OER, in particular, ensuring that the materials are of proper quality, appropriate for the class demographic, and are technologically compatible with the course aims. The Open Scholarship website also contains a rubric for evaluating OER that addresses relevance, accuracy, production quality, accessibility, interactivity, and licensing. As an additional evaluative tool, many OER repositories include reviews of particular resources from other users, often other instructors, which provide a succinct and critical overview for  helping instructors quickly evaluate a particular OER. If you are still having trouble finding the right OER for your course, or are interested in development, the Scholarly Communication department can help instructors create their own OER.

Create

Creating an OER for your course can take many forms, and there are several resources available to you. One option is using Pressbooks, an accessible tool that allows users to create, edit, and publish texts in a variety of formats. It is easy to involve students with Pressbooks, and they can even create OER as a final project for a course. The Pressbooks User Guide provides a walkthrough of the tool, and the Open Pedagogy Notebook provides examples and suggestions for creating OER with students. There are even funding opportunities for supporting OER creation and implementation, such as IUB’s Information Literacy Course Grant. For a more thorough discussion of a recent example, please see Scholarly Communication Librarian Sarah Hare’s previous blog post about a course that received an Information Literacy Grant to create an OER using Pressbooks.

Further Resources

Not every class is the same, and the steps discussed above are not always linear. The process often includes a combination of different steps. The Scholarly Communication department offers various resources and services to help you integrate OER into your classroom, no matter what your project looks like. A detailed list of these services, including FAQs, can be found under the Open Scholarship website’s new Open Education tab, and the IU OER LibGuide provides supplementary resources and information. While this blog post details the Scholarly Communication Department’s OER services, it does not exhaust all available options for finding, implementing, and/or creating affordable course materials at IU. If you have any further questions about OER and how you can incorporate them into your classroom, please email iusw@indiana.edu.

Using Podcasts and Videos for Scholarly Communication

In recent years, many libraries have started to promote their resources and engage with patrons, the local community, and the larger world through social media. This is perhaps most obvious on Twitter–our own IU Libraries has a strong presence at @iulibraries and @hermanbwells. Still, there are other platforms, including Instagram and Snapchat, that are key for engaging  younger library patrons. Both the Herman B Wells account and the Lilly Library account have worked hard to make information about the library accessible and relevant via these platforms.

Podcasts are becoming yet another new and exciting avenue for informing researchers, students, and other library patrons of library services and engaging them with the complexities of 21st century library work. These kinds of podcasts—either hosted by or focused on librarians/libraries—are becoming increasingly popular. Some of my favorites include the Public Library Association’s podcast, the librarian-run All Booked Up and The Librarian is In and  the American Library Association’s Dewey Decibel Podcast. Last fall, the Scholarly Communication Department experimented with podcasting and capturing audio testimony through a series of interviews. The goal of podcasting was to make the concept of open access more approachable and understandable to all patrons. The podcasts were also an opportunity to zoom in on specific services the department offers and better understand how those services impact the IU community at large.

The department decided to position these podcasts around the theme of Open Access and Open Education, which are valuable commitments to us (and libraries as a whole!). In that spirit, we narrowed the interviewees down to three people: Willa Liburd Tavernier, the Open Scholarship Resident and Visiting Assistant Librarian at IU Bloomington; Michael Morrone, Senior Lecturer at the Kelley School of Business and editor of IU Libraries Open Access Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning; and Brant Ellsworth, Assistant Professor of Humanities at Central Penn College and editor of IU Open Access Journal Children’s Folklore Review.

Working with the IU Faculty Media Production Space, we interviewed each person, recording both video and audio. Capturing video allowed us to take important clips and put them on Instagram and YouTube. Samuel Underwood in Collaboration Technology and Classroom Support was integral in helping us edit and these clips, which cover everything from the diversity and accessibility of the open access movement to recognizing that students lose access to scholarly research:

Anyone interested in starting an OA journal or learning more about IU Libraries Journal Publishing Program will also be interested in:

Finally, full audio clips are available for anyone who would like to listen. These clips offer listeners more information about the importance of open access and highlight how journals can make the leap to OA :

The Scholarly Communication Department is excited about reaching researchers and students in new ways. Questions? E-mail iusw@indiana.edu.

Ownership & Openness in Scholarly Publishing Panel Recap

On February 20, 2019, the IU Libraries Scholarly Communications department hosted a panel, “Ownership & Openness in Scholarly Publishing: A Panel Discussion on Reforming Academic Journals,”  that brought together IU faculty, staff, graduate students, and other professionals from various aspects of scholarly studies and publishing. The panelists included Cassidy Sugimoto, Gabriele Guidi, Vincent Larivière, and Bernie Frischer. The panel’s goal was to discuss the process of “flipping” journals–the process of converting subscription-based journals to open access journals, the experiences of two different  journals in their transition to open access, and the implications of the open access movement on research.

flier for ownership and openness panel

Cassidy Sugimoto is an IU School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering (SICE) professor, and is one of the former editors of the Elsevier-owned Journal of Informetrics. She is one of the individuals who played an instrumental role in flipping the journal that is now known as Quantitative Science Studies. She is also the president of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI). Vincent Larivière is an associate ILS professor at the School of Library Science at the University of Montreal. He was also on the editorial board of the Journal of Informetrics and played a significant role in making QSS open access.

The Journal of Informetrics saw its entire editorial board resign earlier this year– after an extensive but unproductive process to resolve their differences with Elsevier– in order to create a new journal that is more in line with open access principles and practices. The new journal, Quantitative Science Studies, has been accepted and is supported by The International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics. Sugimoto, Larivière, and their colleagues hope that moves such as theirs, which are happening increasingly as journals work toward being open access, will spur other journal editors and staff to work to make their own journals part of this movement.  As of January 2019, QSS is accepting submissions.

Gabriele Guidi, an engineering professor from the Politecnico di Milano, and Bernie Frischer, an IU SICE informatics professor, are co-founders of the open-access journal Studies in Digital Heritage (SDH), previously known as the Digital Applications in Archaeology & Cultural Heritage under Elsevier. After attempting to collaborate with Elsevier to remedy concerns about their high APC for open access, their unwillingness to help the journal embed 3D models for illustration and interactivity, and their discontent with the slow growth of the journal, Guidi and Frischer chose to cut ties. In October of 2016, they parted ways with Elsevier and have since been taking the necessary steps to make their journal open access. Since publishing with IU Libraries, Studies in Digital Heritage has published 50 articles in 2 years, culminating in 2 issues per year. The journal has been able to not charge an APC or a subscription fee to any of its users.

Guidi also cited open access efforts as helping to combat issues of oligopoly and indexing in scientific publishing. Reed-Elsevier, Springer, Wiley-Blackwell, Taylor and Francis, and SAGE currently dominate the publishing market. This leads to exorbitant costs, anywhere from $2,000-$4,000 (or more) for authors to publish in a high-impact journal. In contrast, collaborating with a university library to publish an open access journal can provide a more sustainable model. For example the institution invests so that authors pay a smaller fee, which can be as low as $250. Lower costs and increased freedom in publishing practices are among the factors that are drawing editors to the open access movement.

This panel brought together scholars from a variety of disciplines and approaches to advancing access and research. The question and answer period was lively, with audience members asking questions ranging from how open access journals will impact student research to what the success of open access journals and their funding looks like long-term. The panelists’ responses to trends in open access and scholarly publishing illustrated that the push toward open access is crucial for the success and sustainability of academic publications, as well as determining what resources remain available to future scholars. Although there are obvious hurdles in the process of making a journal open access, based on the discussions that took place over the course of this panel it would seem that a growing number of editors are willing to make the change in order to attempt to disrupt the often frustrating current trends in academic publishing.

Find the presentation slides in our institutional repository: http://doi.org/10.5967/s1d3-hp09

Stream the recording here: http://go.iu.edu/29JD

Questions about flipping a journal with IU Libraries? Contact IUSW@indiana.edu

Students Creating Open Educational Resources with Pressbooks: Redesigning L700

It’s Open Education Week again and we’re celebrating Open Educational Resources! In 2018, we hosted a “Driving Student Success through Affordable Course Material” Symposium. The symposium featured three guest speakers from University of Wisconsin-Madison and centered on a UITS-supported book publishing tool, Pressbooks. Lots has happened with OER at IU since then: UITS rolled out Pressbooks for everyone with IU credentials (now anyone can log in and create/ publish OER with Pressbooks) and the Libraries started to partner with CITL and UITS to create tailored OER outreach for instructors in STEM. We’re also hosting a Brown Bag on OER on Wednesday, March 6–join us in person or on Zoom!

One of the most important outcomes of the symposium, though, was a course redesign for an online, doctoral-level course in the School of Education, L700: Seminar in Literacy, Culture, and Language Education (LCLE). The instructor of the course, Beth Lewis Samuelson, attended the symposium and became interested in Pressbooks as a result. Pressbooks is a great tool for authoring course material content: you can import/ export in multiple formats, it’s easy to use and looks like WordPress, and has some added features like built-in plugins for student annotation and engagement with texts.

Beth had already been talking to Julie Marie Frye, Head of the Education Library, about how to redesign the course so that students’ important work could be shared publicly. A core assignment for the course is a group project that asks students to present an overview of a research methodology or theory. The assignment is intentionally designed to give students an opportunity to do a deep dive into a methodology or theory that might be of interest for their dissertation work. The course is required for doctoral students in LCLE and this assignment recognizes that it is impossible to provide a comprehensive overview of every methodology; instead, students explore what is of interest to them with the support of the instructor, colleagues, and librarians.

Our hope was that compiling students’ guides  into an OER would both a) make the assignment more meaningful and impactful and b) help other researchers interested in a comprehensive overview of a particular methodology find more information. Students creating OER is often called open pedagogy. Open pedagogy is pedagogy that:

  • moves past the “disposable assignment” (where students turn in an assignment, it is graded, and the work ends there) toward assignments that are immediately useful to wider publics
  • centers public and visible teaching and learning, expanding the boundaries of the classroom and giving students authentic experiences
  • recognizes students as expert, pushing back on narrow definitions of expertise and working from the understanding that student work is worth sharing

As Beth, Julie Marie, and I discussed student-created OER in more detail, we realized that students may need additional support in understanding openness (including Creative Commons) and mastering information literacy concepts related to evaluation, authoring, and entering the information ecosystem as not only readers, but also creators and authors. We also recognized that as doctoral students, it was an important exercise for students to read, understand, and sign a copyright agreement (and practice consulting with a co-author to agree on such an agreement) in order to contribute. Thus, we went with an “opt in” model, which is unique from other open pedagogy projects. Other projects will often be designed around an open class project with students opting out or completing alternative assignments if they don’t want to participate. There are pros and cons to each model but we intentionally chose this design in order to make publication processes and authorship more transparent.

We applied for and were awarded two grants to complete the redesign: a School of Education Teaching with Technology grant and an IU Libraries Information Literacy Course Grant [read our proposal]. These grants gave us funding and a support structure that made the redesign possible. For example, as a result of the grant we were able to hire a Pressbooks editor that kept track of author agreements, set up the Pressbook, collected contributions, and performed basic editing.

The grants also helped us expand the scope of the redesign in order to better support students and enhance their understanding of information literacy issues. As a result of the Teaching with Technology grant, we were able to hire an artist and videographer to create “chalk talks” that present concepts visually and inspire in-depth conversation about complex topics like authority and confidence as a new scholar. Chalk talks are educational videos where an instructor explains a concept verbally while a sketch presents information visually. One goal of shifting to a chalk talk model is that students see information presented in a variety of ways. For example, chalk talks often challenge instructors to illustrate concepts, often requiring that they use metaphors or analogies that help students make connections. The chalk talks also made a “flipped librarian” model possible, where the concepts covered in the talks didn’t also have to be covered in consultations.

We have several colleagues to thank for helping us draft this content. School of Education Professors Mitzi Lewison and Karen Wohlwend generously agreed to meet with us to discuss their research and publication processes. These interviews helped us craft and refine many of the scripts for the chalks talks. Additionally, as a result of the information literacy course grant, we were able to consult with Undergraduate Education Librarian Meggan Press on the chalk talk content, greatly improving how we presented concepts to students.

Four chalk talks were created on the following topics:

  • Credibility of Scholars: how scholars establish credibility
  • Acknowledgement of Authorities: best practices for acknowledging others’ work and building upon scholars before you
  • Challenging Authorities: the challenges of entering the scholarly conversation or information ecosystem as an author, particularly when pushing back on established work
  • Your Intellectual Property: how authors publish their work, including an overview of Creative Commons and copyright

a scene from the chalk talk on intellectual property depicts options for author rights: transfer, granting a license, or retaining

A scene from the chalk talk on intellectual property

All of these chalk talks will be openly licensed so that others can use them! 

Since L700 was online in Fall 2018, students were asked to answer a few questions about each chalk talk in order to engage with the content. For example, for the video on intellectual property, we asked students:

  • Have you ever had to sign a copyright agreement? If so, was it a transfer or did you grant a license to the publisher?
  • What excites you about sharing your work formally in the information ecosystem? What’s still intimidating or unclear about sharing your work?
  • Explore the Creative Commons License generator. Which license(s) align with how you want your work to be used by others?
  • What questions do you still have about copyright and your intellectual property?

Overall, we felt the redesign was successful. Discussions within Canvas about the chalk talks were thorough and engaging. Students had follow up questions about open access dissertations, which resulted in recording a short presentation on dissertations specifically. Each of the  Fall 2018 students agreed to contribute to the Pressbook via the contract we drafted in consultation with Copyright Librarian Naz Pantaloni. We are continuing to refine the Pressbook itself but hope to publish it (under a Creative Commons license!) soon. Additionally, L700 students from Spring 2018 and Spring 2019 are also contributing to the Pressbook. Thus, the book will span multiple course sections.

Still, there is work to be done. We continue to be involved in L700 and in mid-February, Julie Marie and I visited the course to facilitate a card sort activity, which asked students to reflect on how they evaluate and prioritize sources for their research. As an example, one of the criteria we discussed with students was cost, which prompted more in-depth conversations about open access than we had with previous iterations of the course. 

Table of contents of the pressbook, including chapters and sections

Short Guides in Education Research Methodologies Pressbook Table of Contents [on left] and sections of one of the research guides on Conversation Analysis [center]

We can’t wait to assess student learning by analyzing the Pressbook, discussion postings, and engagement with the chalk talks. This will help us better understand the redesign and how we could improve the curriculum and our pedagogy. Before our formal assessment we can still say that we learned some lessons along the way! Here are some tips for instructors considering a similar redesign:

  • Try to integrate conversations about open access throughout the course, not only when discussing OER. This should be a core component of conversations about finding literature and accessing resources. (This is something the Scholarly Communication department can help with!)
  • Try to have curriculum content created before the semester starts! We were creating content while the course was happening, which was a challenging balancing act.
  • Think through how design needs to change or adjust when teaching in person vs. online. Every redesign should consider this context and how presentation of content changes based on course makeup and setting.
  • Flesh out ways that students might explore different forms of critical annotation. In this assignment, students create a sort of annotated bibliography but using hypothes.is or a similar tool might lend itself to a different kind of engagement.

Are you interested in having your students create a textbook or other OER? Are you interested in better integrating digital literacy topics like curation, evaluation, and sharing intellectual property into your course? Wondering what Pressbooks is and how easy it would be for students to use?

Not sure where to start? We’re happy to help! E-mail iusw@indiana.edu to set up a consultation today.  

Two Year Anniversary of the Open Access Policy

This post was written by Scholarly Communication department student assistant Allison Nolan.

In February 2017, the Bloomington Faculty Council passed an Open Access policy. The policy provides a mechanism for making faculty-authored articles published after 2017 open access (unless faculty opt out of the policy for a particular article). Beyond making content open access, the policy asks faculty to reflect on how they would like their work to be used in perpetuity. IU Bloomington’s was the 56th faculty council in the world to unanimously pass an open access policy, joining Harvard, Duke, Princeton, Stanford, MIT and others.

In conjunction with the policy, the Scholarly Communication department launched a new institutional repository, IUScholarWorks Open, to accommodate articles made openly available as a result of the policy. IUSW Open acts as a seamless service point for faculty to deposit articles, opt out of the policy, or view their colleagues’ open access work. Over the last two years, the Scholarly Communication department has aligned the IU faculty annual reporting system, where most faculty already enter information about their research and creative activity, with the OA Policy. Department staff processed IUB faculty-authored scholarly articles across all disciplines while also encouraging faculty to submit their work to the repository directly through targeted outreach.

In the two years since the policy was instituted, over 500 items have been deposited to IUSW Open, all by various IU faculty authors and collaborators. SC department staff have been able to share the final versions (sometimes called the version of record) of over 200 articles and link over 150 open access versions of articles from authors across IUB. In addition to checking publisher policies for faculty-authored articles, Scholarly Communication staff consulted with individual faculty to share a version of their article open access.  

In addition to highlighting the quantity of articles made openly available, it’s important to showcase the range of scholarship faculty published and subsequently was made available. These highlights are obviously only a small subset of the articles made openly available but they illustrate that the diversity of topics represented within the repository is evident and mirrors the intellectual diversity of the IUB faculty. For example, Kylie Peppler’s “Advancing Arts Education in a Digital Age” discusses how instructors can utilize digital tools in order to help students become content creators, rather than simply rejecting technology as something that distracts from or changes the nature of content creation. Angela T. Maitner and others’ “The impact of culture and identity on emotional reactions to insults”  explores the ways in which people from different ethnic backgrounds react to insults related to an aspect of their cultural or religious identity, specifically in relationship to cultures that are rooted in concepts of honor and dignity. Kelly M. Moench and Cara L. Wellman examined the manner and speed of dendrite rebuilding in mice, particularly females, after periods of prolonged, chronic stress. The goal of the experiment was to determine the impact of stress on both male and female brains and it was concluded that the long-term effects of continued stress, rather than acute stress, were more likely to lead to detrimental outcomes in women. Each of these articles pose questions that are relevant to advancing their respective fields, and the interdisciplinary nature of IUScholarWorks Open allows all of these research outputs to exist in the same space.

In the last two years, IUB’s open access policy has helped to highlight faculty research and create critical discussions surrounding open access and the opportunities that it provides for academic scholarship. As an example, an Open Access Article Publishing Fund was recently established by the IU Libraries and the Office of the Vice Provost for Research to subsidize the cost of publishing gold open access. IUScholarWorks Open will inevitably grow as time goes on and faculty work continues to be processed. We hope that knowledge of the policy and IUSW Open, and ongoing educational efforts as to what exactly it means to make academic work open access, will increase faculty engagement on this important issue.

IU South Bend Passes Open Access Policy

This blog post was authored by Craig Finlay, Scholarly Communications Librarian at IU South Bend.

We are very pleased to announce that on Friday, January 18, 2019, the Indiana University South Bend Faculty Senate unanimously approved an Open Access policy, making us the third IU campus to do so.  We join IU Bloomington and IUPUI in working to promote OA and in so doing increase the accessibility, reach and impact of our faculty scholarship.

The policy itself can be found here.  While based on the Harvard Policy, our policy differs in that it contains no language requiring faculty to provide copies of their research.  The small size of our campus and the comparatively smaller research output (Compared to large universities like IUB and IUPUI) affords us the luxury of relieving faculty of that requirement.  The Office of Research – Academic Affairs produces an annual publication list gleaned from the faculty annual reports (now Digital Measures). The number of publications makes it feasible for us to grab them ourselves and check for copyright permissibility.  This could be an important point to remember for smaller universities looking to pass an OA policy.  Often faculty objections to a policy stem from resentment over requirements of self-deposit.

Over the past few years I pounded the pavement visiting department meetings and giving presentations aimed at highlighting traffic to publications already placed into our IU ScholarWorks community. I generally did not spend much time talking about the altruistic aspects of OA, having found that this approach is greeted more with polite affirmation than anything else.  More effective is convincing faculty that OA publishing will drive attention and citations to their publications.

This strategy was strongly influenced by a pair of talks by Jere Odell, Scholarly Communication Librarian at IUPUI, at the Michiana Scholarly Communication Librarianship Conference at IU South Bend in 2014 and 2016. Jere was also a continual source of advice and wisdom in my journey, the value of which I cannot overstate.

While it may seem tempting to focus heavily on the potential of OA to reach underserved communities, the fact is self-interest seems to grab people’s attention much more readily. Given limited presentation times at departmental meetings, time is of the essence.  After some time demonstrating usage statistics and talking about the potential citation boost, I started pitching the OA policy itself.

First, I approached faculty allies who had already taken initiative to contact me regarding depositing their scholarship, hoping to get them to help spread the message.  I also sought and received endorsements from the Office of Research, the Library Affairs Committee and the head of the newly-established Center for Excellence in Research and Scholarship (CERES). I repeatedly emphasized the unique aspect of our proposed policy, that it would require no extra work on the part of faculty.  It was the LAC that brought the policy before the senate, which, being from a committee, meant the policy was already seconded when it was announced.

Ultimately, the policy passed unanimously.  Given seven minutes to explain the policy to the senate, I discussed the traffic to existing publications in the IR and the fact that our policy asked nothing of faculty save consent of deposit. I owe a great debt to the colleagues, campus departments and faculty allies who aided in getting our policy passed.  If I had to give one bit of advice to a librarian at a small campus such as IU South Bend trying pass a policy while balancing myriad other job responsibilities it would be to identify and cultivate such sources of support and advice.  There’s no point in trying to do it alone.