Black Lives Matter: IU Libraries Curates Resource List

With the rising awareness and discourse surrounding racial inequity in the United States, you may have noticed several resource lists curated to educate and inform the public. These include, but are not limited to, Black-authored revolutionary texts, histories of race relations in the United States, Anti-Racism toolkits, and tips for meaningful allyship. You may also have noticed that these resources often do not last long and are often modified or removed entirely. This may happen for a number of reasons, including the failure to obtain proper permissions to post and publicly disseminate the resources they used. To create a more stable collection of resources, IU Libraries’ Scholarly Communication Department has created a list of materials consisting entirely of either library licensed content for IU Bloomington affiliates or open access resources, meaning they are free and available for the public to use and disseminate. As an IUB affiliate, you can freely access all items on our Black Lives Matter resource list

Library Licensed Content

The Libraries’ collection contains many foundational Black revolutionary texts and other resources. All library licensed content (LLC) is available to  anyone with an IU Bloomington affiliation at no cost. This list contains a combination of e-resources, which can be accessed online with your CAS credentials, and print resources, which can be checked-out through the Libraries’ no-contact Paged Pickup. A few of the resources, while not normally available electronically, have been digitized through the Hathi Trust Emergency Temporary Access Service. These are marked by the Hathi Trust logo on the resources IUCAT page. To access these, click on the logo and login with your CAS credentials. Some highlights from the LLC resources are:

  • The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness (Michelle Alexander, e-book)
    • This book examines the relationship between systematic racism and incarceration, specifically among black males, and inequity which Alexander claims needs to be treated as both a racial justice and civil rights issue.
  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings (Maya Angelou, autobiography)
    • Angelou’s autobiography serves as a coming of age story which details the author’s experiences and recovery from racism and its surrounding traumas.
  • Teaching to Transgress (bell hooks, book)
    • bell hooks’ pedagogical theory suggests teaching students to “transgress” against boundaries and biarnies of race, class, sex, etc. to achieve free and democratic thinking. 
  • The Racial Contract (Charles Mills, essay)
    • This foundational essay challenges white European-centered philosophical thinking, arguing that these philosophers create a “Racial Contract” that perpetuates (either implicitly or explicitly) white supremacy and the disclosure of black voices. 
  • Algorithms of Oppression (Safiya Noble, book)
    • Noble’s book demonstrates how seemingly innocuous tools, such as Google, maintain the white control of information and perpetuate racism. 

Open Access Resources

For those without an IU affiliation, the list also contains several open access resources. Open access resources are those which can be freely accessed by the public without restrictions. All resources marked with an “OA” are open and can be accessed anywhere and by anyone. Some highlights from the OA resources are:

  • Why The Coronavirus Is Hitting Black Communities Hardest (Code Switch; podcast)
    • This podcast discusses why marginalized communities have been disproportionately impacted by COVID-19.
  • A Timeline of Racial Progress in the U.S., and the Lack of It, Through the Years by Dr. Carolyn Calloway-Thomas, Chair, African American and African Diaspora Studies at IU Bloomington and Sam Hill, Newsweek contributor
    • This article features a timeline “Racial Progress in America: The Slow March Forward” which highlights the progress and setbacks in seeking racial justice in America
  • The Urgency of Intersectionality (Kimberlé Crenshaw, TED Talk)
    • This TED Talk expands on Crenshaw’s coined term “intersectionality” and the increased biases people face when their different identities (e.g., race, class, sex, sexual orientation, etc.) combine to create more severe forms of oppression.
  • Celeste Bartos Forum: Literacy, Libraries and Liberation (Angela Davis and Toni Morrison; interview with the New York Public Library)
    • A conversation between the New York Public Library, activist/scholar Angela Davis, and author Toni Morrison on racism in libraries. Both a recording and a transcript of the conversation are available. 
  • 13th (Ava DuVernay; documentary)
    • DuVernay’s documentary explores the history of racial inequity in the United States, focusing on the criminal justice system. 
  • Celebrating Black History Month (Poetry Foundation; online collection) 
    • This collection of poems from the Poetry Foundation celebrates and highlights the works of black poets, including Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Hayden, and Langston Hughs. 

This list is by no means comprehensive or finite, but it serves as a starting point for anyone to educate themselves and others about racial inequity. Please contact IUSW@indiana.edu for suggested additions to the resource list or with any questions. 

Data & Visual Literacy and the COVID-19 Infodemic

This post was contributed by Map & Spatial Data Librarian Theresa Quill.

Scholarly and scientific information is distributed in a variety of ways.  The COVID19 pandemic has spurred a large volume of scholarly literature, but also data sharing and data visualization to track the spread of this coronavirus and the impact of efforts to combat it. Some of this information is reliable and some of it is not.

Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian Jackie Fleming and Map & Spatial Data Librarian Theresa Quill were recently published in Digital Culture and Education, discussing their efforts to combat the COVID-19 infodemic.

It is not an exaggeration to say that the evolving situation surrounding COVID-19 is changing the world. This change includes the response and mission of academic libraries. Information about COVID-19 is being published every day in both textual and visual formats. One thing that all of this information has in common is that it is easily accessible to the public. As academic librarians, we believe that it is our job to guide our community to reliable information and teach them how to receive and interpret this information.

The democratization of data visualization and mapping tools over the past decade has meant that creating and sharing visualizations is no longer limited to the realm of experts. While this trend has been overall beneficial, it has also resulted in increased visibility for (mostly unintentionally) misleading or confusing maps and charts and places a greater burden of critically reading and evaluating visualizations on the reader.

The authors say –

“As the Map & Spatial Data Librarian and, Visual Literacy and Resources Librarian at Indiana University-Bloomington, we believed that it was our responsibility to address the surge of visual information being produced daily about COVID-19 cases. We decided that the best action to take was to create a Visual Literacy & Map LibGuide that specifically addressed data visualizations tracking COVID-19 cases. This guide lists reliable data visualizations to follow, tips for reading these visualizations, and general resources for spatial and visual literacy as well as, articles addressing COVID-19 data visualizations. Because COVID-19 is a rapidly evolving situation, we have been periodically adding information to this guide as we find it. We felt that creating this LibGuide was a good first step in developing our campus community’s visual literacy skills in the COVID-19 crisis.”

You can view the research guide here: https://guides.libraries.indiana.edu/visualliteracyandmaps

And the full article here: https://www.digitalcultureandeducation.com/reflections-on-covid19/visual-literacy-and-maps

 

COVID-19 demonstrates the value of Open Access. What happens next?

This is an excerpt from an article published in College & Research Libraries News May 2020.

In the wake of COVID-19, many publishers have tacitly agreed that open access is beneficial to scientific advancement and necessary to move science forward to combat disease. Publishers have committed to open access publication of scientific articles relating to the disease. Some are facilitating rapid and open peer review and fast-tracking the publishing of related research. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Michael Hiltzig refers to this convincing demonstration of the value of open access to scientific research as one of the most important positive disruptions caused by COVID-19.

The World Health Organization maintains a global research hub with links to several publisher sites for access to coronavirus research, and the United States Centers for Disease Control has compiled a similar list. Elsevier (and its high profile journals like Cell, and The Lancet), Wiley, SpringerNature, The New England Journal of Medicine and scores of other publishers and publications have provided open access to COVID-19 research. Even news magazines like Wired and Medium, which usually allow readers access to a limited number of free articles without a subscription, began providing free unlimited access to stories about COVID-19 shortly after it was classified as a global pandemic. They also offered an invitation to sign up for email updates, as if our anxiety levels were not already high enough. SpingerNature is encouraging researchers to use their In Review pre-print system while articles are being peer-reviewed and to share datasets widely. Many vendors are offering free access to online learning solutions and educational resources for the remainder of the spring semester. Some researchers have chosen to bypass traditional journals altogether, putting their work on disciplinary pre-print servers.

While the absence of peer review on these platforms has the potential to widely disseminate misinformation, the robust use of pre-print servers by the scientific community has worked to rebut spurious claims, in effect crowd sourcing rapid expert peer-review. (So no, there is no evidence that COVID-19 was manufactured in a lab. ) It is also worth noting that Nature’s Outbreak Science Rapid PREview server, which was established in response to COVID-19, allows scientists with an ORCID ID to submit a review while reading pre-prints pulled in from the medRxiv, bioRxiv and arXiv repositories.

Government officials in the US, Australia, Brazil, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea, and the UK are now calling for even wider access. This would encompass the text of journal articles as well as machine-readable text to enable analysis using artificial intelligence, along with research data made available through sources like PubMed Central and the World Health Organization’s COVID database. Outside of the realm of scientific publication, the Taiwanese response to the outbreak highlights how easy, free public access to reliable information is beneficial to a robust, effective response across a complex system which requires the co-ordination of governance, institutions, individuals and their varying points and levels of interaction. Taiwanese analyst Victor (Lin) Pu argues that “the free flow of information is the best treatment for the coronavirus outbreak.”

At the time this article was written, the current outbreak was expected to subside within a few months, with health authorities using shutdowns, social distancing and quarantines in an effort to ‘flatten the curve’ of contagion.  When the pandemic subsides, where do we go next in academic publishing? Clearly, most stakeholders in this pandemic situation regard knowledge about the disease as an open access common pool resource — a public good that should be freely accessible. Does this change in the absence of a crisis? Is it then acceptable to slow the progress of science? And who has the right to make these decisions?

Read the complete article in College & Research Libraries News.

Welcome Karen Stoll Farrell, Interim Head of Scholarly Communication

The Scholarly Communication department is excited to announce that Headshot of Karen S Farrell, a white woman with straight brown hair, smiling, in a black suit jacket.Karen Stoll Farrell has agreed to serve as our Interim Head of Scholarly Communication. She will provide essential support and advocate for our department, as well as ensure services are maintained for our patrons. Karen is additionally the Librarian for South Asian and Southeast Asian Studies, and the Head of the Area Studies Department at IUB Libraries.

Karen’s current research interests include equity and inclusion in libraries, South Asian film, and web archives. Some recent publications are “Supporting the Changing Research Practices of Scholars across Asian Studies at Indiana University-Bloomington” and (with Jackie M. Dooley, Tammi Kim, and Jessica Venlet) “Developing Web Archiving Metadata Best Practices to Meet User Needs.” With Sumit Ganguly, Karen also co-edited Heading East: Security, Trade, and Environment between the U.S., India, and Southeast Asia (New Delhi: Oxford University Press).

Karen is currently serving  as a member of the South Asia Open Archives Executive Board (2020-2023), and as Digital Initiatives Chair (a committee which will direct a grant funded by the Henry Luce Foundation) for the Committee on Research Materials on Southeast Asia.

As we continue to persevere in the strange times, our department is thankful to have an advocate with excellent leadership experience and dedication to the IU Libraries. We look forward to working with Karen in the times ahead!

Securing Image Rights for your Publication

Scholarly publications often include images. From reproductions of fine art to scientific graphs, images can enhance an author’s work in many ways. Most publishers require images with a resolution of at least 300 ppi, so using clear, high quality images is imperative. However, there are many copyright and intellectual property concerns when using images, and the process of obtaining permission can be complicated and can require a large amount of time and occasionally money from the author. The following blog post provides a walk-through, as well as tips and resources, for obtaining image permissions. We suggest following a four-step procedure to facilitate the process of securing image use permission: 

  1. Identifying permission needs
  2. Identity the rights owner
  3. Identify the rights needed
  4. Contact the owner and negotiate if necessary

As copyright and terms of reuse can vary greatly per image, the permissions attainment process begins with identifying your permission needs.

Identifying Permission Needs

Not all images require written permission for use. An image can be freely used if it is in the public domain, has a Creative Commons (CC) license, or qualifies for fair use. In general, all works first published in the United States before 1925 are part of the public domain. Cornell University’s Public Domain Chart provides a clear and thorough resource for determining if  an image first published in the United States is in the public domain. A list of other countries’ copyright durations is available from Wikipedia. Keep in mind that even if a work is public domain, an image of that work is not necessarily in the public domain. For example, while the works of Shakespeare are in the public domain, a museum’s image of a particular folio may have different rights. Be sure to confirm that your image, and not just the original work, are in the public domain. 

One way to do this is to check for the Public Domain Mark:

The letter "C" inside a circle with a slash-through (Public Domain Mark)

The Creative Commons public domain designation enables them to donate their work to the public domain. If the image you wish to use is marked with a Creative Commons license, you do not need to ask permission to use it in your publication. 

There are also many different types of CC licenses, so be sure to determine the use parameters of your specific CC-licensed image. These include Attribution (BY), ShareAlike (SA), NoDerivs (ND), NonCommercial (NC), and various combinations thereof. The Creative Commons’s webpage provides information about each CC license to clarify and differentiate between the various CC licenses. 

Use of an image for purposes of criticism, commentary, research, or teaching might also qualify as a fair use, an overview and definition of which can be found on the U.S. Copyright Office’s Fair Use Index webpage, is a fact-dependent limitation on the exclusive rights of copyright owners. For additional guidance on whether your use of an image is a potential fair use, refer to the IU Libraries guide on fair use, or contact the Head of the Libraries’ Copyright Program, Naz Pantaloni (nazapant@indiana.edu)

Asking for Permission

The first step in asking for permission is to identify the rights owner. Keep in mind that the creator and the rights owner are not necessarily the same. Sometimes the rights owner will be clearly marked. For example, if the image’s metadata reads “Copyright 2020, Indiana University Press”, then you would contact Indiana University Press to request permission. Others are more difficult, and require some research to determine the rights owner. Tips for researching the rights owner include: looking for contact information, checking for a watermark, checking the image’s metadata, and doing a Google reverse image search. Resources like the the US Copyright office, which provides a database where you can search the copyright of a particular image, can help identity the rights owner. 

After the rights owner is identified, you must determine the rights you need. Be sure to consider medium, duration, language, and territory. Your publisher may have required rights for image use, so be sure to confirm with them before contacting the rights owner. Once you have identified the rights owner, you can contact the rights owner and formally request permission to use the image. While each situation will differ, Oxford Journals’ template permission request letter and Georgetown University’s sample permission request letter provide possible examples of how to structure a request letter. Be prepared for patience after contacting the rights owner; many publishers can take between 4-6 weeks to respond, if at all. Also be prepared for fees, as rights owners may ask you to pay to use the images; you can, however, try to negotiate fees with the rights owner. 

Be sure to have a back-up plan, as even if you have followed all of the steps, the rights owner may either not respond or deny your request. The following section provides resources for finding open images, as well as suggested best practices to follow during the permissions process. 

Conclusion and tips/resources

While securing image use permissions can be complicated, there are several ways to help the process go more smoothly. The first is to focus on finding open images, thus nullifying the need to obtain permission. Wikimedia Commons hosts a repository of free-use images and Georgetown University provides a helpful list of places to find open images. If you do have to ask permission, be sure to plan ahead and keep clear and thorough documentation of all correspondences. It is best to ask for non-exclusive, worldwide rights for the lifetime of the image in both print and electronic formats. This assures that you will not have to re-obtain permissions for any reprints, translations, etc. of your publication. Also be sure to keep all original citation information for each image, to expedite your captioning. While the permissions process will look different for each author, these guidelines facilitate the process. They can also serve as a useful resource for journal managers and editors to provide to authors. 

Additional information on using images is available in this guide to using images from the IU LIbraries Copyright Program. For further questions or concerns regarding using images in scholarly publication, please contact Copyright Program,  Naz Pantaloni, at nazapant@indiana.edu.

Remixing Our Collections Recap

On February 6th, IU Libraries hosted Remixing Our Collections: Selections from Indiana, a two-hour exhibit that featured artist books, ethnographic field recordings and popular music, maps, photographs, books, and films drawn from library and campus special collections. The goal of the exhibit was to highlight contemporary art, culture, and scholarship in Indiana. This exhibit was held as part of Indiana Remixed, a semester long celebration of contemporary arts and ideas that shape Indiana today.

The Scholarly Communication Department highlighted articles from Indiana Magazine of History, one of our open access journals. From articles like Dawn Bakken’s “What is a Hoosier?” to Nancy Gabin’s “Bossy Ladies: Toward a History of Wage-Earning Women in Indiana”, the selections explored Indiana’s rich history and past challenges and used this historical perspective to broach contemporary issues and creative growths occurring in this area. We also showcased items from our institutional repository, IUScholarWorks. Andrew Wylie’s family correspondence and Jon Kay’s “Indiana Folk Arts: 200 Years of Tradition and Innovation” were among the items highlighted from the repository. These works give a comprehensive look into the types of works we are able to preserve in IUScholarWorks. More importantly, they provide a small glimpse of what life was like in Indiana throughout time and highlight Indiana University’s efforts to preserve the creative endeavors of Indiana thinkers, writers, and artists. 

Additional exhibit displays included:

media services display, including fliers, buttons, bookmarks, DVDs
IU Libraries Media Services’ display at Remixing Our Collections

Other library departments involved in Remixing Our Collections included the Scholars’ Commons, the Sciences Library, the Business/SPEA Information Commons, and the IU Archives of African American Music and Culture

With an entire semester of performances, film screenings, guest speakers, and exhibits, Indiana Remixed explores and questions the ways we create art, community, and meaning in our state. From nationally acclaimed authors and artists to celebrated chefs and performers, visiting guests will share a diverse array of perspectives and backgrounds united by their common experience of life as Hoosiers. Visit the Indiana Remixed webpage for more information about the program and a complete list of upcoming events

To view more articles from the Indiana Magazine of History and other open access journals relating to Indiana and Indiana University, visit the Scholarly Communication Department’s open journals page.  

IU System Joins the Open Textbook Network

The IU system has joined the Open Textbook Network (OTN). Representing over 1,000 institutions, OTN is a consortium of campuses and systems aimed at reducing textbook costs using open educational resources (OER). OTN membership will give IU instructors across the state the ability to review open textbooks in the Open Textbook Library, a collection of nearly 700 textbooks in a variety of disciplines that are free to use, modify, and distribute. Over half of these textbooks have been Open Textbook Network Member badge reviewed by participating instructors, and 70% of the reviews have at least four stars. OTN has found that 45% of instructors who review a textbook go on to adopt it because of its high quality and comprehensiveness.

As part of the OTN membership, IUB staff will receive training on how to find, evaluate, and share open educational resources. Staff will then return to Bloomington to lead workshops for instructors, which introduce both OER and the Open Textbook Library. After each workshop, instructors have the opportunity to review one of the available textbooks in the Open Textbook Library. IUB instructors will receive a stipend for attending the workshop and posting a textbook review in the library. The OTN model provides a low-stakes way for faculty to learn more about OER while aggregating high-quality reviews that help others discern the strengths and weaknesses of OER in a specific subject area. Any IUB instructor of record is eligible to attend a workshop and write a review.

OTN membership also gives IU access to the Publishing Cooperative, an online community with resources to support open textbook publishing and modification. Most of the textbooks available through the OTN library are legally licensed to be modified. The Publishing Cooperative offers guidance to assist instructors in adapting an open textbook to suit their needs. If instructors want to develop their own textbook, the Publishing Cooperative also provides online tools, courses, and step-by-step guides on the open textbook publishing process.

Finally, as a member of the OTN, IUB will have an opportunity to shape the strategy and governance of a key organization that has furthered OER across the nation. Instructors and staff will also be able to monitor textbook usage and track student savings.

According to the OTN website, the average student is now spending $1200 annually on textbooks and supplies. Participating in the OTN will save students money on textbooks while helping instructors customize their course materials.

For more info about OER please visit the Open Scholarship website and be on the lookout for open textbook workshop dates in Bloomington in the Fall.

IU systemwide OTN membership was made possible through the Central Indiana Community Foundation. 

5 Tips to Amplify the Impact of Your Scholarly Work

Individuals, departments and institutions are increasingly concerned with understanding and evaluating scholars, their output and productivity, as well as the impact of their scholarly work.  If you are an instructor or researcher, your own personal curiosity may lead you to search for strategies to demonstrate impact, or it may be a requirement for academic promotion, or to get tenure.  Here are 5 ways you can increase the impact of the work you do.

1. Make your work available to as wide an audience as possible

Making your work (or some version of it) open access is a great way to increase impact. Open Access is the free, immediate, online availability of scholarly work, coupled with the rights specified by the scholar to reuse this work. Indiana University provides the IUScholarWorks and IUScholarWorks Open repositories to help scholars disseminate and preserve their work.  Works deposited in these repositories are assigned a permanent identifier that will not change over time, as well as descriptive keywords to make works discoverable to others. 

IUScholarWorks Open hosts articles published after February 2017 that are subject to the Indiana University Bloomington Faculty Open Access PolicyIUScholarWorks is a wider repository that is designed to host, preserve, and make discoverable a variety of scholarly work by any IU affiliate (e.g. white papers, presentations, data, educational materials, research articles,  poster presentations, etc.).

In addition, IU Libraries provides open access journal publishing options.  IUScholarWorks Open Journals is a suite of over 55 journals that offer open access publishing in a variety of disciplines such as education, vascular medicine, optometry history, digital heritage, newborn developmental care, languages, folklore, disability studies, and interdisciplinary undergraduate research.

2. Manage your scholarly identity and promote your work

Managing your online scholarly identity is an important strategy for scholarly impact – research offices and employers increasingly look at online profiles as a surrogate CV, and some services are already tracking and collating the work of scholars and generating impact profiles.  Two easy first steps in taking charge of your online identity are creating an ORCID iD and a Google Scholar profile. 

An ORCID iD is a persistent numeric identifier that is unique to you. Using ORCID connects you with a trusted record of your education and employment affiliation, and work that you have contributed including presentations, publications, or educational materials.  You can use the permanent identifier provided by IUScholarWorks in ORCID, so that others can access your work. Go to www.orcid.org  or consult our ORCID Libguide: guides.libraries.indiana.edu/Orcid-IU.  

Google Scholar is a tool that can be used to keep track of your own publications, and publications that cite your work. It can help you increase search engine optimization (SEO), and make your work more discoverable. Google Scholar indexes material deposited in IUScholarWorks and can send you an alert when it indexes work that should be attributed to you. For more information see https://libraries.indiana.edu/google-scholar.  If you already have a Google Scholar profile, review it to ensure that the record of your work is accurate and up to date.  

Many academics also social media and social sharing platforms to promote their work.  You can write a short plain-language summary of your work and include your IUScholarWorks permanent identifier so that others can review the work for themselves. You can also include your ORCID iD so that potential readers can see the full range of work that you have done.

3. Make an impact plan

The beginning of a semester is a great time for forward planning.  An impact plan should include:

  • The factors you will be evaluated on.
  • One or more achievable goals for your scholarly work over the semester.
  • Strategies and tools to help you increase, track and document the impact of that work.
  • A roadmap detailing steps and timeframes to implement the strategies and tools.

4. Learn what quantitative and qualitative indicators are suitable for evaluating your work and how they might be used

Best practice in scholarly evaluation recommends using multiple indicators to provide a more robust picture of attention, influence, and impact.

A common metric is citation counts, or the number of times that a published work has appeared in the reference list of research articles or books. This metric is best used in evaluating the usefulness of research articles, books, and datasets, but citations take time to accrue, and a work may be cited to critique or disparage it rather than for its usefulness.  Journal Impact factor is a venue-level measure reflecting the annual average number of citations of recent articles published in that journal. It can be useful in comparing the relative influence of journals within a discipline but is not a good indicator of the quality or usefulness of individual articles or authors.

Altmetrics include item views, downloads, media coverage, government policy mentions, and social media mentions.  These track attention, but are not accurate indicators of whether someone has actually read your work. Some social sharing sites (Mendeley, Academia.edu) offer readership statistics – again, this does not track actual reading but rather the number of users who have added an article into their personal library.

Altmetric providers and some repositories also track a user’s geographic location when they access an item.  While this can illustrate the geographic reach of a scholarly work, it can be affected by the use of VPN (virtual private networks) and some ISP (internet service provider) practices that mask users’ true locations

Qualitative indicators are equally important and may include:

  • Invitations e.g. to speak, facilitate, intervene, exhibit or consult
  • Grant funding
  • Patents/Licenses
  • Changes in professional or technical standards
  • Incorporation in workflows or implementation in your field
  • Participant feedback

IU librarians can help you use appropriate indicators to create a narrative around the scholarly contributions that are most valuable to you to make your case for scholarly excellence.

5. Consult with a Librarian

IU librarians will partner with you to:

  • Manage your online scholarly identity
  • Increase the visibility of your work.
  • Incorporate practices within your teaching and scholarship to facilitate gathering data on impact.
  • Understand how metrics and altmetrics are calculated and used, their benefits and limitations, and how to apply them to your work.
  • Identify and use qualitative indicators of impact.
  • Recommend other relevant services such as IU Libraries CV Service openscholarship.indiana.edu/oa-cv-service.   

To learn more about the impact services offered by IU Libraries, review our impact services page, or contact the Scholarly Communication Department at iusw@indiana.edu.

 

ORCID requirement for NIH – 2nd deadline fast approaching

The National Institutes of Health, Centers for Disease Control, and Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality have implemented the 1st phase of the new requirement for ORCID iDs for researchers supported by new training (T), fellowship (F), education, or career development (K) awards in fiscal year (FY) 2020. The requirement for ORCID identifiers was incorporated into the appointment process for trainees, scholars, and participants supported by institutional research training, career development, and research education awards that require new appointments through the xTrain system in October 2019At the time of appointment, the xTrain system will check whether appointees have ORCID iDs and appointments will be not be accepted for agency review unless an ORCID iD is linked to the individual’s eRA Commons Personal Profile.  

An ORCID iD is a single persistent numeric identifier that is unique to you. Researcher names are neither unique nor static. Many researchers may have the same name, and your name may change over time with life events. Using ORCID connects you with a trusted, verifiable record of your education and employment affiliation, grant funding, research, and work that you have contributed such as presentations or publications. This verification along with its data transfer capacity i.e. ORCID’s ability to move information through connected information systems designated by the user (via APIs or  Search & Link functions), makes ORCID a natural partner for integration into the eRA Commons PPF. 

Beginning with receipt dates on or after January 25, 2020, the requirement for ORCID identifiers will be enforced at the time of application for new individual fellowship and career development awards. The requirement does not apply to fellowship and mentored career development non-competing renewals, or to individuals supported via administrative supplements to enhance diversity.

Researchers must create an ORCID iD (Open Researcher and Contributor Identifier) and associate it with their eRA Commons Personal Profile. The eRA Commons is an online interface where grant applicants, grantees and federal staff at NIH and grantor agencies can access and share administrative information relating to research grants. The Personal Profile (PPF) in eRA Commons is the central repository of information on all registered users. It is designed so that individual eRA system users can hold and maintain ownership over the accuracy of their own profile information, and provides a single profile per person, regardless of the various roles they may hold throughout their relationship with the agency (e.g. trainee, graduate student, principal investigator, etc.), assuring data accuracy and integrity. Learn how to create and link your ORCID iD to the eRA Commons here.

At Indiana University, you can connect your ORCID iD with Digital Measures for annual reporting. 

You can also link your ORCID iD to other professional accounts such as PubMed, SciENcv, Web of Science, and ScholarOne.   Learn more about how to register for and use ORCID in our guide – ORCID@IU

New Issue of The Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL) Published

The Journal of the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (JoSoTL) has published a new issue for October, 2019. The IU Libraries host over 60 issues of JoSoTL open access, dating back to 2001.

JoSoTL focuses on publishing rigorous, data-driven research, along with innovative case studies, essays, critiques, and articles that “contribute to deeper understanding of the issues, problems, and research relevant to the community of reflective teacher-scholars.”

Stylized cover of October, 2019 issue

The current issue includes articles exploring various factors that influence student success. “Instructor Response to Uncivil Behaviors in the Classroom: An Application of Politeness Theory,” for example, investigates effective classroom management. When a student is actively disruptive, the instructor must choose, on the spot, between a stern or gentle response to the student’s behavior. In these situations, the instructor risks losing credibility or unnecessarily embarrassing the student based on the firmness of his or her response. This article describes an innovative experimental study of student responses to instructor classroom management strategies. In the experiment, students viewed and responded to videos of classroom management scenes. The authors find that students respond the most positively to stern, direct instructor responses to disruptive behavior.

Another article, “Claiming Their Education: The Impact of a Required Course for Academic Probation Students with a Focus on Purpose and Motivation,” examines the effectiveness of requiring a remedial, credit-bearing course for college students on academic probation. The authors find that requiring a course with “a curriculum centered on helping students identify purpose and motivation” can be a “useful intervention for helping to dramatically increase the retention and graduation of students facing academic difficulty.”

Finally, “‘If They Don’t Care, I Don’t Care’: Millennial and Generation Z Students and the Impact of Faculty Caring” focuses on student reactions to faculty demeanor. Through in-depth interviews with Millennial students, this study investigates student perceptions of instructor “caring” and its impact on motivation. In general, the authors find that students perceive adaptable, empathetic instructors as being the most caring. Student were, for example, more comfortable with instructors who acknowledged the many other responsibilities student have in addition to their classwork.

These articles exemplify JoSoTL’s empirical approach to pedagogical scholarship. The Journal is published four times per year and is available in the Directory of Open Access Journals.