Our thoughts on web governance: ACRL TechConnect post

Following last year’s launch of the Libraries’ new Drupal website, we in Discovery & Research Services have continued to clean up migrated site content, provide guidance and support for creation and management of existing content,  and plan for the future. Recently the three of us – Courtney McDonald, Rachael Cohen, and myself – spent some time talking about our website, and academic library websites in general, and discovered we had some thoughts about what those websites should be like and how they should be managed.

Sharing is caring, as they say, so we wrote up our thoughts – collaborative writing can actually work, if you have the right collaborators! – and the resulting paper has been published on the ACRL TechConnect blog. It’s something of a position paper, a bit of a manifesto, somewhere between a scope statement and a strategy. We’d love to hear any responses that you might have! You can read it here – From Consensus to Expertise: Rethinking Library Web Governance.

(By the by, if you find web governance and that sort of thing interesting, you might also enjoy the slides & notes from my recent presentation at Confab Higher Ed – “Cleaning up after a messy website migration: How to start fresh when you can’t start over.” Shameless self-promotion, sure, but I promise it’s relevant! And it will give you a bit of context/background on how “From Consensus to Expertise” came to be. And, you might also like the IU Digital Library Brown Bag presentation that Courtney and I gave earlier this fall – also web governance-related: “Content Strategy as a Model of Web Stewardship.”)

ACRL TechConnect logo

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New databases for October

The following list represents new subscription databases added to the A-Z list of Resources, as well as those for which the vendor or platform has changed, from October 1-30. You may wish to add one or more of these to your subject guides. New databases will be posted to reDUX at the end of each month. You can also find a list of the newest resources, and those for which a trial is underway, at http://libraries.indiana.edu/electronic-resources-trials-and-new-additions.

Brill’s Medieval Reference Library
https://libraries.indiana.edu/brills-medieval-reference-library

Frank Leslie’s Weekly
https://libraries.indiana.edu/frank-leslies-weekly

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New databases for September

The following list represents new subscription databases added to the A-Z list of Resources, as well as those for which the vendor or platform has changed, from September 1-30. You may wish to add one or more of these to your subject guides. New databases will be posted to reDUX at the end of each month. You can also find a list of the newest resources, and those for which a trial is underway, at http://libraries.indiana.edu/electronic-resources-trials-and-new-additions.

Hobbies and Crafts Reference Center
https://libraries.indiana.edu/hobbies-crafts-reference-center

Late Qing Dynasty Periodical Database
https://libraries.indiana.edu/late-qing-dynasty-periodical-database

Music Industry Data
https://libraries.indiana.edu/music-industry-data

NCCS Data Web
https://libraries.indiana.edu/nccs-data-web

Shoah Foundation Visual History Archive
https://libraries.indiana.edu/shoah-foundation-visual-history-archive

Springer Protocols
https://libraries.indiana.edu/springer-protocols

WindowsWear Pro
https://libraries.indiana.edu/windowswear-pro

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Content Strategy as a Model of Web Stewardship

brown bag with Steve Jobs' photo on it

Steve Jobs Ultra-Geek Lunch Bag | Photo Giddy on flickr

Heads up! Two-thirds of DRS – that would be Courtney McDonald and Anne Haines – will be presenting a short talk in the IU Libraries’ Digital Library Brown Bag series, coming up Wednesday, September 9th at noon (Eastern Daylight Time).

Content Strategy as a Model of Web Stewardship: Content strategy is an emerging area of expertise related to user experience design work, defined as “planning for the creation, delivery, and governance of useful, usable content.” This session will provide a brief overview of content strategy concepts and describe how a well-articulated content strategy can enable a better user experience through thinking holistically and strategically about web content — in other words, in stewardship. We’ll also present a brief case study of how, through implementing these tools and processes, our small department was empowered to stop simply chasing web pages around and instead invest our efforts into crafting a user-centric, sustainable web presence for the IUB Libraries (http://libraries.indiana.edu).

So if you’re curious about content strategy, the Libraries’ website, making websites more user-centric, or how many cute kittens and puppies we found a home for in our slide deck, either come to Hazelbaker Hall in the Wells Library (E159, behind the reference desk in the Scholars’ Commons) or tune in online at http://connect.iu.edu/diglib.

The presentation will be archived if you can’t make it next week. If you do attend, either on-site or online, plan to share your thoughts and questions on Twitter using the hashtag #dlbb. We look forward to seeing some of you!

Later this semester the other one-third of DRS, Rachael Cohen, will be speaking about our library catalog and user-centered design approach – watch for that in November, and check out the full fall semester DLBB series schedule.

 

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New databases for August

The following list represents new subscription databases added to the A-Z list of Resources, as well as those for which the vendor or platform has changed, from August 3-31. You may wish to add one or more of these to your subject guides.  New databases will be posted to reDUX at the end of each month.

Films on Demand Master Academic Collection
https://libraries.indiana.edu/films-demand-master-academic-collection

Henry Stewart Talks Biomedical & Life Sciences Collection
http://libraries.iub.edu/henry-stewart-talks-biomedical-and-life-sciences-collection

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New databases for July

The following list represents new subscription databases added to the A-Z list of Resources, as well as those for which the vendor or platform has changed, from July 1-31. You may wish to add one or more of these to your subject guides.  New databases will be posted to reDUX at the end of each month.

Integrum Profi
http://libraries.iub.edu/integrum-profi

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New databases for June

The following list represents new subscription databases added to the A-Z list of Resources, as well as those for which the vendor or platform has changed, from June 1-30. You may wish to add one or more of these to your subject guides.  New databases will be posted to reDUX at the end of each month.

Anthropology Online
http://libraries.iub.edu/anthropology-online

China Economy, Public Policy, and Security Database
http://libraries.iub.edu/china-economy-public-policy-and-security-database

Education in Video
http://libraries.iub.edu/education-video

Japan Times Archives
http://libraries.iub.edu/japan-times-archives

Krokodil Digital Archive (DA-KRO)
http://libraries.iub.edu/krokodil-digital-archive-da-kro

LGBT Studies in Video
http://libraries.iub.edu/lgbt-studies-video

LGBT Thought and Culture
http://libraries.iub.edu/lgbt-thought-and-culture

Nursing Education in Video: Second Edition
http://libraries.iub.edu/nursing-education-video-second-edition

Oxford Handbooks Online. Criminology and Criminal Justice
http://libraries.iub.edu/oxford-handbooks-online-criminology-and-criminal-justice

Oxford Handbooks Online. Economics and Finance
http://libraries.iub.edu/oxford-handbooks-online-economics-and-finance

Oxford Handbooks Online. Political Science
http://libraries.iub.edu/oxford-handbooks-online-political-science

PrivCo
http://libraries.iub.edu/privco

Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (TLL) Online
http://libraries.iub.edu/thesaurus-linguae-latinae-tll-online

Universal Database of Library and Information Sciences (UDB-LIB)
http://libraries.iub.edu/universal-database-library-and-information-sciences-udb-lib

Universal Database of Russian National Bibliography (UDB-BIB)
http://libraries.iub.edu/universal-database-russian-national-bibliography-udb-bib

Universal Database of The Moscow University Press (UDB-MGU) – COMPLETE SERIES
http://libraries.iub.edu/universal-database-moscow-university-press-udb-mgu-complete-series

Western Travellers in the Islamic World Online
http://libraries.iub.edu/western-travellers-islamic-world-online

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New databases for May

The following list represents new subscription databases added to the A-Z list of Resources, as well as those for which the vendor or platform has changed, from May 1  – 29. You may wish to add one or more of these to your subject guides.  New databases will be posted to reDUX at the end of each month.

Criminal Justice Abstracts with Full Text
http://libraries.iub.edu/criminal-justice-abstracts-full-text

GLBT Library Catalog
http://libraries.iub.edu/glbt-library-catalog

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Confab Central 2015: Less Content, Better Managed and other takeaways

Confab Central 2015 is a wrap! I was very pleased to be able to attend this absolutely fantastic conference for the third year running.

I can’t say enough good things about Confab. The organizers are fantastic, attending to every little detail and making sure attendees’ needs are met; the speakers are smart, generous with their knowledge, and entertaining (yes, entertaining – did you know that the brain holds more new knowledge if you clean it out periodically with a good laugh? SCIENTIFIC FACT*) and the attendees are friendly, interesting, and all-around great folks to spend some time with.

I met and hung out with people who came from the east coast, the west coast, and everywhere in between as well as more far-flung places like Belgium, Switzerland, and Facebookistan. (Seriously, I met a bunch of Facebook employees this time around and you know what? Facebook hires some smart, cool people!) One of the really useful things about this conference for me is getting out of the “higher ed bubble” a little bit. I love working in higher ed, but we have a lot to learn from our colleagues out there in the world of brands and industry. I suspect they learn something from us, as well.

Confab program, name badge, and other swag

umm, that name badge says “speaker” … yikes!

This year was a little different for me as it was my first time attending with the word “SPEAKER” on my badge. Presenting a session at Confab was a pretty great experience; the audience is SO ENGAGED, which makes it delightful to share thoughts and ideas with them. (If you’re interested, I’ve included readings & resources – including a link to my slides – in my follow-up blog post.)  I learned a lot from preparing the talk as well as from delivering it, which makes it a success in my book. Since my name and bio were in the conference program, I was tracked down by a handful of IU alumni who were excited to meet a fellow Hoosier content strategist; that was also a delight!

So, some specific takeaways from this year’s Confab:

  1. Over and over, multiple speakers stressed the importance of editing, weeding, reducing, decluttering your web content. At the macro level, in his workshop on “Top Tasks and Self-Service: Creating better customer experiences online,” Gerry McGovern gave some startling examples of websites that reduced their content and saw increased usage and/or higher user success rates (defined as “the users were easily able to complete the tasks that were important to them”). For example, Columbia College launched a new site in 2014 which had 944 pages compared to 36,000 on their old site – a 97% reduction!!! – and they saw a resulting 82% increase in inquiries per month (a highly favorable outcome given that a major goal of their site is to attract prospective students). In his workshop, McGovern outlined a methodology for identifying your users’ “top tasks” and designing so that these tasks can be accomplished more quickly and easily. His closing keynote was a condensed version of the “top tasks” argument, minus the detailed methodology for getting it done; it was very pointed, very funny, and well worth viewing. (Note, the first few minutes of the talk are omitted – most of the best stuff is here though. Also, if the video doesn’t display in your browser, see kb.iu.edu/d/bdny for help.)Other talks with a similar focus included Matthew Grocki’s “Reducing Digital Clutter: How to clean up the back of your house” and Marcia Riefer Johnston’s “Write Tight(er): Get to the point and save millions,” which used the example of web content that requires translation – at a measurable cost per word – to make a case for the importance of editing out every unnecessary word. From top tasks to tiny words, other sessions also touched on this theme and certainly left me with the sense that this is a universal struggle for web content wranglers. Less content, better managed, using better metrics! That’s an excellent goal.
  2. And speaking of metrics, the importance of data in making decisions and taking action was also a theme. Content strategy as a discipline draws heavily from user experience (UX) in its emphasis on testing and design iteration, but many content strategists come from marketing or journalism backgrounds and haven’t necessarily studied UX in any formal way, so learning about how to make good data-driven decisions is new for some of us and important for all of us. Again, Gerry McGovern’s workshop included a lot of this including some specific methodologies for gathering and understanding user data. Deborah Carver and Kate Pennell gave a great presentation, “Humans make search happen: Behavioral data to debunk SEO’s sullied reputation,” which not only talked about how to look at search data to understand users’ behavior but also managed to make it lively and entertaining. Kim Marques shared her ideas for “Delivering Your Content Strategy: Effective Documentation and Deliverables” to help us get that data across to the people who need to see them. And the need for numbers came up in a bunch of other sessions as well. In short, we may think we know what our users want, but unless we see what they are actually doing – in other words, gather data on their behavior, know how to understand it, and do something about it – we’re just whistling in the dark.
  3. And finally, collaboration – working together to identify and solve problems – was a huge, important theme this year. From Jonathon Colman’s stunning opening keynote, which posited that we must solve our big problems together or not at all (seriously, take the time to watch this talk, or at least read the transcript – it was the highlight of the conference for me) to Rebekah Cancino’s great talk on “Next-level collaboration: The future of content and design” to, if I may be so bold, my own talk which offered up good old-fashioned reference interview techniques as a way to collaborate with clients and stakeholders via structured communication – over and over it became clear that we are all in this together and need to figure out how to work together. Our workflows and processes are by necessity (to quote Rebekah Cancino) “overlapping, iterative, messy.” This means we need new ways of working together to get things done. As content strategists, as people who make the web happen, we are engaged in nothing short of changing how people are able to communicate with one another. That’s pretty mind-blowing. Yes, we’re all working in our own domains – brands, non-profits, higher ed, what have you – and we’re all working on our own projects, but unless we break through those silos and work together, we are all struggling alone.

Big stuff, huh? Yeah. But cake helps. And good humor. And the willingness to share knowledge. All of which are available in surplus at Confab Central. Not to mention that the main stage had an actual space rocket and a backdrop of twinkling stars. (For a conference attended primarily by word-nerds, the visual design throughout Confab is – yes, I’m going to go there – out of this world!) Oh, and did I mention that Anne Lamott gave Friday morning’s keynote? She claims not to know what content strategists do, but she said “it sounds like what you people do sort of resembles wrestling drug-addicted cows” and proceeded to talk to us as writers, so I think she pretty much got it.

I closed out my conference by joining up with an international gang of wild and crazy content strategists who set forth to have dinner at Sea Salt, a great seafood shack overlooking Minnehaha Falls – definitely a true Minnesota experience. We made all the nerd jokes and laughed A LOT. Learning, laughter, and great food – what more could you possibly ask of a conference? YAY CONFAB.

group of people standing in front of a waterfall

happy content strategists

______

*note: scientific fact not guaranteed factual

See also my posts about previous Confabs.

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“If She Knew What She Wants”: Resources & follow-up

Many thanks to all who attended my talk, “If She Knew What She Wants: Librarian mind-reading tricks for fun and profit,” at Confab Central! It was a lot of fun (and learning!) putting together the talk, and terrifying but fun actually delivering it. Confab audiences are the BEST.

I’m also grateful to the friends and colleagues who were instrumental in helping me think through issues, track down resources, and put together the talk. I’m lucky to know and work with so many smart, helpful people. You all know who you are, and I owe you cookies.

And a BIG thank you to the amazing folks at Confab Events, for putting on this ridiculously well-managed and delightful conference every year. Without the stuff I’ve learned at Confab, this talk wouldn’t have existed, and I daresay the entire trajectory of my career would look different and much less interesting.

You can find my slides on Slideshare.  (You can also view a version of my slides on Haiku Deck, where the image credits are more legible.)

For Further Reading:

Coates, Ta-Nehisi. “Tolstoy Is the Tolstoy of the Zulus.” The Atlantic, Aug. 20, 2013. http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2013/08/tolstoy-is-the-tolstoy-of-the-zulus/278789/ (This essay is the source of the quote “The best way to placate a difficult man is to ask him to teach you something.”)

Cohen, Georgy. “Content Strategy as Problem Solving.” Meet Content, Dec. 17, 2013. http://meetcontent.com/blog/content-strategy-as-problem-solving/ (Great article about the importance of identifying problems before coming up with solutions.)

Dervin, Brenda and Patricia Dewdney. “Neutral Questioning: A New Approach to the Reference Interview.” RQ, Vol. 25 No. 4, 506-513, Summer 1986. http://www.jstor.org/stable/25827718 (Pioneers the concept of neutral questioning, also called sense-making questions.)

Dewdney, Patricia and Gillian Michell. “Oranges and Peaches: Understanding Communication Accidents in the Reference Interview.” RQ, Vol. 35 No. 4, 520-523, 526-536, Summer 1996. http://www.jstor.org/stable/20862995 (Useful study of listening gone wrong and what we can learn from that.)

Portigal, Steve. Interviewing Users: How to Uncover Compelling Insights. Brooklyn: Rosenfeld Media, 2013. (Mainly about conducting research with end users, but has some fantastic insights – particularly in Chapter 6, “How to Ask Questions.”)

Rach, Melissa. “Stakeholder Interviews: Engage the Octopus.” Brain Traffic blog, July 26, 2012. http://blog.braintraffic.com/2012/07/stakeholder-interviews-engage-the-octopus/ (Brief but good piece about the role of stakeholder interviews in the content strategy discovery process.)

Rasmussen, Claire. “Do It Like a Librarian: Ranganathan for Content Strategists.” Brain Traffic blog, June 7, 2012. http://blog.braintraffic.com/2012/06/do-it-like-a-librarian-ranganathan-for-content-strategists/ (Not about the reference interview, specifically, but some interesting points about the intersection of content strategy & librarianship in general.)

Ross, Catherine Sheldrick, Kirsti Nilsen, and Marie L. Radford. Conducting the Reference Interview: A How-to-Do-It Manual for Librarians. New York: Neal-Schuman, 2009. (A thorough introduction to reference interview techniques and strategies.)

Taylor, Robert S. “Question-Negotiation and Information Seeking in Libraries.” College & Research Libraries, Vol. 29 No. 3, 178-194, May 1968 (Reprinted, Vol. 76 No. 3, 2015). http://crl.acrl.org/content/76/3/251.abstract (Classic analysis of the reference interview.)

Young, Indi. “A New Way to Listen.” A List Apart, No. 414, Feb. 17, 2015. http://alistapart.com/article/a-new-way-to-listen (A great little article about how good listening builds empathy. I tried to get her book, Practical Empathy, but it’s so new that no library would ILL it – it’s high on my reading list!)

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